Electric Machine Guns, Coilguns and Death Ray Guns of Yesteryear

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The first successful machine-gun designs were developed in the mid-19th century. The key characteristic of modern machine guns, their relatively high rate of fire and more importantly mechanical loading, first appeared in the Model 1862 Gatling gun, which was adopted by the United States Navy...

World’s Fair 1939-40 Female Sex Robots

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I cannot find any evidence of who designed and built these robots. It is as if they have just sprung in to our timeline. And searching around the web, the syndicated news articles are all written as if the writer is 'shocked' by their revelation... The article also mentions this guy, who we have...

The Most Beautiful Building in the Midwest is in Iowa?

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Other household name content providers in our space have covered this American Wonder in very fine detail before (e.g. UAP dedicated an entire video to it on YouTube). However, I was not able to find this particular building mentioned in any great detail on SH so thought I’d light up the stage...

Proposed Building for the New York American

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Given this is one of the more egregious falsehoods that big history has crammed down our collective throats, I thought I’d highlight a few more of the anomalies that smacked any remaining taste of reasonableness right out of my mouth. Crooked Roman columns at the base of the structure. Really...

1885 Industrial Exposition Building in Minneapolis

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The exterior walls were masonry and the interior had metal support structures. The building's capacity was estimated at between 11,000 and 15,000. The entire building was completed in just over three months: the cornerstone was laid on April 29, 1886 and the building was finished on August 3. On...

Mexican temple of Santiago, master builder monks and our failed archaeology

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I have this growing notion that our archaeology is meant to conceal our true history versus uncovering the mysteries of the past. Here is another prime example, which shows how lame the official position is. It is rather comical that the Associated Press which earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes...

19th century: Underground City in Turkmenistan and the fake Caspian Sea History

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Some interesting things we can find in the older books. Has anyone ever heard of this huge underground city located in Turkestan (I assume it's today's Turkmenistan) sometime at the end of the 19th century? As far as I understand this town of Karki should have have been spelled Kerki. This is...

18th & 19th centuries: artificial Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tsunamis

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Isn't it interesting that back in 1750 (probably way earlier than that) people knew what needed to be done to cause an artificial earthquake. It definitely appears that they also knew how to cause a tsunami. Google Ngram did not disappoint. I picked a few book excerpts to demonstrate the content...

1726: Jonathan Swift - Gulliver's Travel

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The Citizens of this land are described as 6 inch (15cm) people. The conflict between two small nations shows relations between France and England in 18th century. Describe of their behaves: "At first, the Lilliputians are hospitable to Gulliver, but they are also wary of the threat that his...

Mud from the sky, and water from nowhere

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Now, the Blood Rain, Mud Rain and the Dust of the Regular Winds are not seemingly related to the regular floods. At the same time, there could be a lot more in common than meets the eye. I ran onto this interesting publication dated with 1850. The mere fact that people were concerned with such...

19th Century Noah's Arks: Whaleback Steamer Ships

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A whaleback was a type of cargo steamship of unusual design, with a hull that continuously curved above the waterline from vertical to horizontal. When fully loaded, only the rounded portion of the hull (the "whaleback" proper) could be seen above the waterline. With sides curved in towards the...

Khedive period architecture in Cairo, Egypt

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If I didn't tell you where these buildings are from, would anyone have guessed it would have been Cairo of all places? This stuff looks like it came straight out of Renaissance Rome or Baltimore/St. Louis/Washington DC circa 1900s. What is unique about Cairo is that a lot of this architecture...

Leonids Meteor shower of 1833

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The Leonids are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Tempel–Tuttle, which are also known for their spectacular meteor storms that occur about every 33 years. The Leonids get their name from the location of their radiant in the constellation Leo: the meteors appear to radiate from...

Area 51 a.k.a. Totonteac: the Seventh City of Cibola?

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The United States Air Force facility commonly known as Area 51 is a highly classified remote detachment of Edwards Air Force Base, within the Nevada Test and Training Range. According to the CIA, the correct names for the facility are Homey Airport and Groom Lake, though the name Area 51 was...

Will the real Pontius Pilate please stand up, and show us your toga?

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Once again, it appears that fake "antiquity" is being forced into the World History narrative. It looks like our Pontius Pilate (if he ever existed) was considered to be some sort of a medieval historical figure. This, in turn, pushes all the accompanying events into the time frame which...

Artificial Ancient Granite and Marble

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And having now fully described my said invention and the manner in which the same is to be performed, I declare that what I claim as new and of my invention is the mode or modes hereinbefore described of making an artificial granite-stone, marble, or concrete. And I declare that I do not confine...

Norwich Cathedral, England.

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For myself growing up, I could appreciate the magnificence of the great Pyramids. Sadly though, they weren't anything more than curiosity. What I was missing was context. The great deception these enemies of humanity contrive is to strip stuff of its context. Finding an old tea pot in your grand...

Ancient American Roots by Jon Levi

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Strange as it may appear, America abounds in antiquities, so extensive, so beautiful, and so majestic, as to rival those of Thebes or Nineveh. Ruins of ancient cities, of immense extent; fortifications, mounds, and pyramids; temples, with walls built of hewn stone, showing a refined taste in...

Royal BC Museum: Stone Hammers, Mayan Balls and Metal Pipes

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No pipe touching was allowed, but it sure was no gold, or copper. It appeared to have some light rust about it, and appeared to have the same altar material inside of it. You judge for yourself, but it looked like a piece of an iron pipe. May be iron piping was required for ancient Mayan altars...

Victoria, BC or BS: real history buried in 20 feet of dirt

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If something happened in 1907-1910 and resulted in 20 feet of dirt burying the entire city, wouldn't history reflect that? It probably would, but then again, nothing is surprising any longer. Personally, I think whatever brought the dirt happened way before 1907. I'm thinking along the 1812 time...

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