Circular lakes: evidence of the War of Gods?

Circular lakes sure do look cool, and are normally considered to be admirable creations of nature. Along with circular lakes there are smaller lakes with imperfect round shape. We are provided with multiple reasons for the existence of the said lakes. Those normally are: meteorite craters, sinkholes, gas explosion lakes, etc. The official narrative wants us to think that these "natural" lakes are hundreds of thousands, and sometimes millions of years old. But are those lakes really natural, and are they really as old as we are being told?

Explosion Caused Lakes
and craters
Here are a few examples of the lakes which were created due to war time bombings, military testings and industrial explosions.

2015 Tianjin explosions, China
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On 12 August 2015, a series of explosions killed 173 people and injured hundreds of others at a container storage station at the Port of Tianjin. The first two explosions occurred within 30 seconds of each other at the facility, which is located in the Binhai New Area of Tianjin, China. The second explosion was far larger and involved the detonation of about 800 tonnes of ammonium nitrate. Fires caused by the initial explosions continued to burn uncontrolled throughout the weekend, resulting in eight additional explosions on August 15.

WW2 Peenemünde Bomb Craters, Germany
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Source

Bombing of Laos, Vietnam
Bombs_Vietnam_Laos.jpg

Source

WW2 Westerwald, Germany
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A4/V2 Sites in Westerwald

Lake Chagan, Kazakhstan
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Lake Chagan in Kazakhstan, is a lake created by the Chagan nuclear test fired on January 15, 1965, part of the Nuclear Explosions for the National Economy. A 140 kiloton device was placed in a 178-metre (584 ft) deep hole in the dry bed of the Chagan River. The blast created a crater 400 m (1,300 ft) across and 100 m (330 ft) deep with a lip height of 20 to 38 m (66 to 125 ft).; it is often referred to as "Atomic Lake".

Yucca Flat, NV, USA
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Yucca Flat is a closed desert drainage basin, one of four major nuclear test regions within the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and is divided into nine test sections: Areas 1 through 4 and 6 through 10. Yucca Flat is located at the eastern edge of NTS, about ten miles (16 km) north of Frenchman Flat, and 65 miles (105 km) from Las Vegas, Nevada. Yucca Flat was the site for 739 nuclear tests – nearly four of every five tests carried out at the NTS.

Sedan Crater, NV, USA
nevada_sedan_crater.jpg

Sedan Crater is the result of the Sedan nuclear test and is located within the Nevada Test Site, 12 miles (19 km) southwest of Groom Lake, Nevada (Area 51). The crater was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on March 21, 1994. The crater is the result of the displacement of 12,000,000 short tons (11,000,000 t) of earth. The 1,280 by 320 ft (390 by 100 m) crater was created on July 6, 1962 by a 104-kiloton-of-TNT (440 TJ) thermonuclear explosion. The device was buried 635 feet (194 m) below the desert floor in Area 10. The explosion created fallout that affected more US residents than any other nuclear test, exposing more than 13 million people to radiation. Within 7 months of the excavation, the bottom of the crater could be safely walked upon with no protective clothing and photographs were taken.
  • Diameter: 1,280 feet (390 m)
  • Depth: 320 feet (98 m)
Natural Lakes
and craters
All but one of the below lakes, and craters were supposed to be created by nature. Please take a look and compare to the above man made lakes and craters.

Meteor Crater, AZ, USA
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The crater was created about 50,000 years ago during the Pleistocene epoch, when the local climate on the Colorado Plateau was much cooler and damper. The area was an open grassland dotted with woodlands inhabited by mammoths and giant ground sloths. The object that excavated the crater was a nickel-iron meteorite about 160 feet (50 meters) across. The speed of the impact has been a subject of some debate. Modeling initially suggested that the meteorite struck at up to 45,000 mph (20 km/s) but more recent research suggests the impact was substantially slower, at 29,000 mph (12.8 km/s). It is believed that about half of the impactor's bulk was vaporized during its descent through the atmosphere. Impact energy has been estimated at about 10 megatons. The meteorite was mostly vaporized upon impact, leaving few remains in the crater.
  • Diameter: 0.737 miles (1.186 km)
  • Depth: 560 feet (170 m)
Clearwater Lakes, Canada
Clearwater_Lakes.jpg

The Clearwater Lakes occupy the near-circular depressions of two eroded impact craters (astroblemes). The eastern and western craters are 26 km (16 mi) and 36 km (22 mi) in diameter, respectively. Both craters were previously believed to have the same age, 290 ± 20 million years (Permian period), promoting the long-held idea that they formed simultaneously.

Kingsley Lake, Fl, USA
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Kingsley Lake is an almost circular lake of about 2,000 acres (810 ha) in North Central Florida, about six miles (9.7 km) east of Starke, Florida. According to some sources, it is the oldest and highest lake in Florida, located on the edge of the Trail Ridge formation. The lake is a very stable lake with a sandy bottom. Its deepest part is about 90 feet (27.4 m). Kingsley lake is so nearly circular that pilots call it the Silver Dollar lake.
  • The lake is thought to have formed as a sinkhole.
Lake Yeak Loam, Cambodia
Lake-yeak-loam.jpg

Yeak Loam, is a lake and a popular tourist destination in the Ratanakiri province of north-eastern Cambodia. Located approximately 3 mi (4.8 km) from the provincial capital, Banlung, the beautiful lake occupies a 4,000-year-old volcanic crater. Due to the lake’s tremendous depth 48 m (157 ft), its water is exceptionally clean and clear. The lake is almost perfectly round and measures 0.72 km (0.45 mi) in diameter. Large trees and rich, lush rain forest, the home of many exotic birds and parrots, surround the lake.
  • Occupies a 4,000-year-old volcanic crater
Cañada del Hoyo Lakes, Spain
Cañada del Hoyo lakes.jpg

This protected area is composed of 7 permanent lakes and 4 torcas, each receives a different names: Cruz o de la Gitana Lagoon, Tejo Lagoon, el Lagunillo del Tejo, de la Parra Lagoon, de la Llana Lagoon, de las Tortugas Lagoon & de las Cadenillas Lagoon. The depth of the lakes ranges from 4 m to 32 m. Torcas and sinkholes have been formed as a result of very complex processes of dissolving sedimentary rocks rich in carbonates (dolomite), which caused the collapse of land and conforming these circular structures. The fact that some are filled with water is due to the high groundwater level aquifer associated Guadazaón river and meteoric waters.
  • Lagunas de Cañada del Hoyo are located at the southeast of the Palancares Molar, in the area known as Los Oteros, dolomitic and limestone area developed on Upper Cretaceous. The Cretaceous period lasted from 145 to 66 million years ago. It was divided into two parts, upper and lower. The Upper Cretaceous lasted from 98 to 66 million years.
Lake DeFuniak, Fl, USA
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Lake DeFuniak, said to be one of only two perfectly round natural lakes in the world. Folklore has it that the lake was formed by a large meteor crashing to earth centuries ago. The circumference of the lake is 5,280 feet, which makes a pleasant mile.
  • Unknown origins. Legends point to a large meteor.
Crater Lake, OR, USA
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Crater Lake is a crater lake in south-central Oregon in the western United States. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot (655 m)-deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 (± 150) years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. With a depth of 1,949 feet (594 m), the lake is the deepest in the United States. In the world, it ranks ninth for maximum depth, and third for mean (average) depth.
Kankaria Lake, India
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Kankaria Lake is the second largest lake in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. It is located in the south-eastern part of the city, in the Maninagar area. It was completed in 1451 during the reign of Sultan Qutb-ud-Din Ahmad Shah IIthough its origin is placed in the Chaulukya period sometimes. The lake is 560 m (1,840 ft) wide and 6-7 meters (20-23 feet) deep.
  • Was allegedly created in 1451 artificially. Being 1,840 ft wide and 20 deep... how many horse carriages is that and where did the dirt go to?
  • In my opinion, the shape of the lake was artificially improved which resulted in the perfect circle.
Lonar Crater Lake, India
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The Lonar Lake in Maharashtra, was formed about 50,000 years ago when a meteorite hit the surface. The saltwater lake that evolved in the resulting basaltic rock formation has a mean diameter of 1.2 kilometers (3,900 feet) and is about 137 meters (449 feet) below the crater rim. Numerous temples surround the lake, most of which are in ruins, except for a temple of Daityasudan, at the center of the Lonar town, which was built in honor of Vishnu’s victory over the giant Lonasur. The crater itself is a fun trek and the surrounding vegetation is a treat for birdwatchers.

Pingualuit Crater, Canada
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The Pingualuit Crater was created about 1.4 million years ago by a meteorite impact that had the force of 8500 Hiroshima-sized atomic bombs. The 3.44 km (2.14 miles) diameter crater rises 160 meters (520 feet) above the surrounding tundra and is 400 meter (1,300 feet) deep. The lake at the bottom of the crater has a depth of 270 meter (890 feet) and contains some of the purest water in the world. The lake has no inlets or apparent outlets, so the water accumulates from rain and snow and is only lost through evaporation. The crater was discovered in 1943, by a US Air Force plane on a meteorological flight. Pingualuit means “where the land rises” in the local Inuit language.

Kaali Craters, Estonia
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Kaali is a group of nine meteorite craters in the village of Kaali on the Estonian island of Saaremaa. Most recent estimates put its formation shortly after 1530–1450 BC (3237+/-10 14C yr BP). It was created by an impact event and is one of the few impact events that has occurred in a populated area (other ones are: Henbury craters and Carancas crater). Before the 1930s there were several hypotheses about the origin of the crater, including theories involving vulcanism and karst processes. Its meteoritic origins were first conclusively demonstrated by Ivan Reinvald in 1928, 1933 and 1937.

Tswaing Crater, South Africa
Tswaing_crater.jpg

Tswaing is an impact crater in South Africa that is accompanied by a museum. It is situated 40 km to the north-west of Pretoria. This astrobleme is 1.13 km in diameter and 100 m deep and the age is estimated to be 220,000 ± 52,000 years (Pleistocene). The impactor is believed to have been a chondrite or stony meteorite some 30 to 50 m in diameter that was vaporized during the impact event.

Group of Lakes #1, Russia
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Location Link

Group of Lakes #2, FL, USA
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Location Link

Group of lakes #3, Uganda
Katwe Craters

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katwe-_Crater_Lake.JPG

The Katwe craters are a group of volcanic craters within Queen Elizabeth National Park in Toro, Uganda. The volcanic field is roughly 210 km2 (81 sq mi) in size. The individual craters vary widely in size, but the largest are up to 3 km (1.9 mi) in diameter and 100 m (330 ft) deep. The unusual formations were formed individually by a series of violent volcanic explosions over the last 1 million years. The explosions were a result of superheated gas and steam, and despite the volcanic activity, there was no lava flow.
  • Volcanic explosions 1 million years ago. There was no lava flow.
Bigger and Larger
Hudson bay is only one of the bigger bodies of water which was MIA on the older maps. Great Lakes were not on the older maps either. There are plenty of theories out there suggesting that millions of years ago a few rogue asteroids contributed to their creation.

Hudson Bay Arc – Crater Explorer
Did A Comet Hit Great Lakes Region, Fragment Human Populations, 12,900 Years Ago?
Meet Lake Superior’s Meteor Crater
These Tranquil Lakes Are Actually Ancient Impact Craters
The Great Hudson Arc: A 250-mile-wide mystery | Jonathan Birge

north_america_1.jpg

Below are a few additional maps:


KD: There are thousands of these craters covering Earth. Could some of them be natural? Sure could. I am not that positive about all of them though. As a matter of fact I hypothesize that the majority of these craters have anything but natural origins. The official impact map below is not representative of the true state of things. I believe it only displays a portion of the problem. It does not account for all the Karst Lakes, groups of smaller lakes and other suspicious bodies of water/craters. Some are not even discovered yet.

I personally find it interesting how most, if not all of the impact craters appear to reflect a trajectory which was perpendicular to the surface.
crater_map.jpg
I think we could be witnessing a lot of physical evidence of the Mahabharata level conflict where the Grand War was raged on the Earth population. The only problem we have is the date. 16th and 17th century maps suggest that this war could have taken place about 400 years ago, which appears to be supported by some of the other articles on this blog.
  • The Brahmastra is mentioned in the epics and Vedas as a weapon of last resort and was never to be used in combat. The Brahmastra, as described in the Mahabharata, is a weapon which is said to be a single projectile charged with all the power of the universe.
Brahmastra.jpg

Obviously the size of some of these craters is well beyond our known capabilities. May be this is why that war was called the War of Gods. And may be this is why the Ruins Landscape art was so popular in the 17th century...

ruin_1_1.jpg
 
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  • Verity

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    There was an interesting article in RT the other day. It gives a fairly good overview for a natural answer to at least one form of circular lakes.
    Mysterious giant craters in Siberia: Sinkholes or underground explosions? RT’s special report explores the phenomenon
    Also, in Thunderbolts of the Gods they did various modelling on the round strike marks of electrical bolts hitting the planet. Nice big round circular holes.
    And finally, regarding the War of the Gods, the planets are the gods. The Titans were moved out of place by the Olympiads, our current planetary system.
     

    Aiahavezred

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    Well thought out. The Canadian ones are part of a series of meteors. Al in a tidy row

    Screenshot_20210412-183917_Maps.jpg
     

    Banta

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    I like that "natural causes" can include rocks and assorted debris traveling from regions unknown in "outer space" and hitting Earth, even though no one has ever seen the full event (from traveling across the cosmos to entering the atmosphere and then smashing into the ground). I thought saying "the sky is falling" was the sign of an overactive, paranoid imagination. I guess it's "science."

    How is appealing to space origins any different than saying a god did it? (Spoiler: it's not.) Until I can hop on a spaceship to the moon (or at least a very, very high orbit where I can see the totality of the "planet"), I'm skeptical.

    I think the most likely explanation for the almost perfectly circular lakes is human being related, but there are still many unanswered questions: When? How? Why? And who exactly?
     

    Aiahavezred

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    I like that "natural causes" can include rocks and assorted debris traveling from regions unknown in "outer space" and hitting Earth, even though no one has ever seen the full event (from traveling across the cosmos to entering the atmosphere and then smashing into the ground). I thought saying "the sky is falling" was the sign of an overactive, paranoid imagination. I guess it's "science."

    How is appealing to space origins any different than saying a god did it? (Spoiler: it's not.) Until I can hop on a spaceship to the moon (or at least a very, very high orbit where I can see the totality of the "planet"), I'm skeptical.

    I think the most likely explanation for the almost perfectly circular lakes is human being related, but there are still many unanswered questions: When? How? Why? And who exactly?
    Mostly, geologists and astrophysicists agree that its meteors because they find iridium in every crater and also in the rock layers that date to the theorized large impacts and nowhere else. So, either aliens use iridium bombs, "God's" power is based on iridium(which makes him just an alien),or it came from asteroids.

    We know that asteroids exist. So, that is the answer until a better, more provable, one comes along.

    This is how science works.
     

    Banta

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    Mostly, geologists and astrophysicists agree that its meteors because they find iridium in every crater and also in the rock layers that date to the theorized large impacts and nowhere else. So, either aliens use iridium bombs, "God's" power is based on iridium(which makes him just an alien),or it came from asteroids.
    I disagree on almost every part of your post (except I concede "experts" agree, which is worth absolutely nothing to me). First of all, how would you know that the iridium came from the object that collided with the Earth and not a part of whatever was destroyed at the impact crater?
    Resistance to heat and corrosion makes iridium an important alloying agent. Certain long-life aircraft engine parts are made of an iridium alloy, and an iridium–titanium alloy is used for deep-water pipes because of its corrosion resistance. Iridium is also used as a hardening agent in platinum alloys. The Vickers hardness of pure platinum is 56 HV, whereas platinum with 50% of iridium can reach over 500 HV.

    Devices that must withstand extremely high temperatures are often made from iridium...

    ...An iridium–platinum alloy was used for the touch holes or vent pieces of cannon. According to a report of the Paris Exhibition of 1867, one of the pieces being exhibited by Johnson and Matthey "has been used in a Withworth gun for more than 3000 rounds, and scarcely shows signs of wear yet. Those who know the constant trouble and expense which are occasioned by the wearing of the vent-pieces of cannon when in active service, will appreciate this important adaptation"
    So iridium could be used to make super durable weapons? Seems like that could be a high profile target in a potential war in antiquity.

    Of course, "science" won't explore that possibility because iridium wasn't "discovered" until the 19th century. So I do not agree that I have to select from your three options listed.
    We know that asteroids exist. So, that is the answer until a better, more provable, one comes along.
    What is the proof for asteroids? Examples of anomalous elements (but not truly "alien", see the thread discussing unobtainium near presumed impact craters)? And then correlating that with lights in the sky? I very carefully worded my post to state "no one has ever seen the full event (from traveling across the cosmos to entering the atmosphere and then smashing into the ground)" and I fully stand by that. Unless you have some real interesting film lying around...
    This is how science works.
    I might agree with that, if you mean that "science" as the bastardized version of the original philosophical discipline. The scientific method doesn't address "what is" questions, like identifying supposed sky rocks, but rather seeks to validate cause and effect through systematic experimentation, not suppositional correlation. What you're describing sounds more like this:
    pseudoscience: a collection of beliefs or practices mistakenly regarded as being based on scientific method.
     
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    I'm with @Banta on this one. We appear to be accepting certain things based on unverifiable "scientific" claims. Comets and asteroids could be bodies coming from above, but their origin is unverifiable.
     

    Aiahavezred

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    Is God? Are aliens? Is anything on this site verifiable?

    We have pictures of asteroids. They fall to earth every day Just not big enough objects to destroy anything. You can track them and if you have a telescope, watch them fly by.

    Are meteor showers now aliens dumping debris into our atmosphere? In yearly cycles, for weeks at a time?

    I like this site. Some of the ideas are fun, interesting, well laid out. But this garbage is exactly why I left the reddit forums that deal with the same subjects.

    KD: Per Aiahavezred's request, his account was disabled.
     

    Banta

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    Eh, probably for the best that Aiahavezred opted out, but it's a bit of a shame, as I'm not trying to be difficult, or promote the existence of God/aliens/whatever. I try to be truly skeptical, but that sword cuts both ways... to fringe topics and mainstream "facts."

    I would like to address the points they made while walking out the door though:
    Is anything on this site verifiable?
    Largely, no. But I also think very little pertaining to events long past is verifiable either. I believe academia has largely deceived the average person into thinking that our world can be solved. I personally think it's the greatest mystery of all time and I am far more interested in pursuing new questions than settling for easy answers, that are largely based on the scientific paradigm and culture of the time.
    We have pictures of asteroids. They fall to earth every day Just not big enough objects to destroy anything. You can track them and if you have a telescope, watch them fly by.

    Are meteor showers now aliens dumping debris into our atmosphere? In yearly cycles, for weeks at a time?
    I am willing to concede the possibility that rocks fall from the sky. I have never personally seen it happen and I imagine capturing video of such an event would be difficult. Do we actually track the streaking light across the sky to its eventual landing spot and then have complete certainty that whatever remains we find in that spot was a physical rock (and not some sort of energetic reaction)? I guess it depends on the level of evidence one is willing to accept. Personally, I need to go on a case by case basis. I will say though that I am far less accepting of believing that asteroids travel millions of miles in a sky vacuum to eventually crash into Earth.

    Meteor showers are lights in the sky with little to no physical evidence. i feel like our departed friend thinks that meteor showers leave all sorts of "debris." They do not.
    A meteor shower is a celestial event in which a number of meteors are observed to radiate from one point in the night sky. These meteors are caused by streams of cosmic debris called meteoroids entering Earth’s atmosphere at extremely high speeds on parallel trajectories. Most meteors are smaller than a grain of sand, so almost all of them disintegrate and never hit the Earth’s surface.
    So, no aliens necessary using earth as their dumping ground!

    It do find it sort of funny that the rebuttals to my skepticism involved implying that I think "aliens" did it, when I put very little stock in the existence of physical aliens as generally described and find the whole "ancient aliens" subculture incredibly reductive and lazy. So to be put into that box is amusing.

    I offer no explanations for celestial phenomenon. It seems to be "natural" though I could also be mistaken about that. However, I am highly dubious when anyone tries to correlate the lights above to physical changes on the earth. It seems to be largely based on the current cosmological model, which allows for and expects such things rather than any sort of direct validation.

    And that brings me to my concluding point... if anyone is open to our understanding of history being false, they need to also consider that our understanding of science is as well. The two do not work in isolation, they use foundational elements of each other to build more elaborate models. If those foundations are faulty, then the conclusions are dubious at best. Again, we do not consider that the iridium anomaly could ever be the result of man-made objects because iridium was not credited with discovery until 1803 by Smithson Tennant. Combine that with dating methods that send our impacts into the distant past, it's easy to see why scientists would not consider an artificially produced possibility. But if any of these assumptions are wrong (that we can accurately date impact craters, that iridium wasn't unknown to man until 200 years ago), then the entire premise falls apart. Eventually, if enough of these premises are proven false, the paradigm that spawned them dies. It seems like that has happened before and I would bet it happens again. Human beings are not good at realizing that we don't know what we don't know and what we do know is incredibly limited when compared to the grandeur of the world.

    Update: I guess I'm "debunked" ... (pretty amazing this article came out yesterday):
    For the first time, scientists have been able to precisely map the flight path of an asteroid that landed on Earth and trace it back to its point of origin. The boulder-size fragment's journey to our planet began 22 million years ago, according to new research.

    The asteroid, known as 2018 LA, appeared like a fireball in the skies over Botswana on June 2, 2018, before breaking apart and landing in the Central Kalahari Game Reserve.
    210427154836-02-2018-la-asteroid-meteorites-super-169.jpg
    Prior to breaking up in Earth's atmosphere, scientists determined that the asteroid was about 5 feet (1.7 meters) in diameter, weighed 12,566 pounds and had been traveling at 37,282 miles per hour.
    These "scientists" are determined all right...
    This is only the second time scientists have been able to observe an asteroid in space before it impacted Earth.The first was asteroid 2008 TC3 in Sudan 10 years earlier, according to Peter Jenniskens, lead study author and meteor astronomer at the SETI Institute and NASA's Ames Research Center.
    Only the second time? I had been led to believe this is common place!
    The Botswana Department of Wildlife and National Parks and the country's Department of National Museum and Monuments helped the researchers search and stay safe in their quest to locate the fragments.

    On the last day of the search, Lesedi Seitshiro from the Botswana International University of Science and Technology found the first one. It weighed 0.6 ounces (18 grams) and was only about 1.2 inches (3 centimeters) in size.
    210427154858-03-2018-la-asteroid-meteorites-super-169.jpg

    Talk about a needle in a haystack. Good thing they found it on the last day. Or else skeptics like me could still go around flapping their ignorant jaws.

    This is my favorite image:

    maps13653-fig-0002-m.jpg

    No mini impact crater? Or buried in the ground? What would happen if you shot a bullet straight into the ground (this was allegedly far faster than that)?
    "The meteorite is named 'Motopi Pan' after a local watering hole," said Mohutsiwa Gabadirwe, study coauthor and geoscientist at the Botswana Geoscience Institute, in a statement. "This meteorite is a national treasure of Botswana."

    Gabadirwe is now the curator of the Motopi Pan meteorite.

    The researchers uncovered a total of 23 fragments within a few months of the event.
    Well, they ended up recovering many fragments, so I guess that'll really shut me up. I don't know what a multi-month expedition looking for pebbles costs, but in my opinion, it's money well spent!

    Now, with stones in hand, tell me a bedtime story please:
    Some of the oldest known materials from Vesta and the meteorites include Zircon mineral grains that date to more than 4.5 billion years ago, back to the birth of our solar system.

    "Combining the observations of the small asteroid in space with information gleaned from the meteorites shows it likely came from Vesta, second largest asteroid in our Solar System and target of NASA's DAWN mission," Jenniskens said. "Billions of years ago, two giant impacts on Vesta created a family of larger, more dangerous asteroids. The newly recovered meteorites gave us a clue on when those impacts might have happened."
    All sarcasm aside, this clearly doesn't fulfill my original "no one has ever seen the full event (from traveling across the cosmos to entering the atmosphere and then smashing into the ground)" and it sounds like this is the best to date. So I guess I'll continue to spread my nonsense beliefs, maybe I should become a Reddit (is that how that works?)

    By the way, in case you're wondering, per wiki, zircon is commonly found in the earth's crust. I would suspect that the more common the composition of these presumed sky rocks plays a role in determining that the origin point was closer, in this case within our solar system.

    If you want to know more, here's the CNN article and a link to the study:
     

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