1921-23 Saint Petersburg in ruins: Pavel Alexandrovich Shillingovsky

KorbenDallas

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Pavel Shillingovsky
shillingovsky_pavel.jpg

1881 — 1942
Painter, graphic artist, engraver and educator, representative of neo-classicism and modern styles.

Shillingovsky was born into the family of a scene and set designer. He got art education at the Odessa Art School (1895-1900), where his teachers were K. Kiriak Kostandi, Gennady Ladyzhensky and Andrei Popov. In 1901, he was admitted to the Higher Art School with the Academy of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg where he studied at Dmitry Kardovsky’s studio (1901-1911) and learned the engraving technique under Vasily Mathe (1912-1914).

He worked in etching, xylography, linoleum engraving, and lithography, but it was engraving that became the focus of his artistic interest. He created many landscape series – Bessarabia (etching, 1913), St. Petersburg. Ruins and Revival (woodcut, 1922-1923), “Besieged City” (woodcut, 1941—1942), as well as woodcut portraits of T.T. Zalkaln (1918), Vladimir Lenin (1924), and Karl Marx (1933). He carefully studied the ‘old masters’ who inspired him to emulate their style in his compositions. An outstanding book artist, he collaborated with numerous publishing houses, such as Academia (1929-1936). His design of Homer’s Odyssey in the spirit of Ancient Greek black-figure ceramics (woodcut, 1935) is an unsurpassed book design masterpiece among his works. Shillingovsky did a lot of teaching, worked at the Printing Department with the Academy of Fine Arts (1922-1929), was director of the Leningrad Institute of Painting, Architecture and Sculpture (1935-1937). He nurtured a galaxy of outstanding graphic artists.

Saint Petersburg in ruins
Google translated, "People’s disasters, war, unrest and fires, outbreaks, explosions, revolutions always left especially vividly their own traces and imprints on big cities, giving a grandiose and sometimes small but full of horror and tragedy picture. "Rome, Germany, England, France experienced these terrible, grave moments. Some perished irretrievably, others revived and flourished again.

The world war of 1914 broke out, and behind it our great Russian revolution. A terrible hurricane came up, and the “Northern Palmyra” peacefully resting for two centuries on the banks of the Neva was one of the main arenas of raging elements, and perhaps the terrors of destruction, cold, and hunger were especially reflected in it. All this is vital - alive and at the same time majestic and beautiful, like the glorious singer of ancient Rome Piranesi, whom he inspired - Pavel Shillingovsky, one of our singers and poets of St. Petersburg, managed in a number of talented drawings and prints."

Ruins and Renaissance
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********​
KD: Considering that these sketches are dated between 1921 and 1923, the devastation is rather strange. As far as I understood, the ruins were attributed to the World War I. 1921-1923 Saint Petersburg ruined to the point presented, clearly was not a part of my education. I also have not seen any same date photographs to back up the above presented images. To be honest, these sketches remind me a mix of urban fires with some mud flood.

Where are the photographs matching these Shillingovsky woodcuts?
 

Searching

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I'm confused.
1540950819409.png


1540950869714.png


The above 2 pics are in Lithuania?
Shillingovsky, P.A.

There was a Polish-Lithuanian war that spanned from spring 1919 to November 1920.
Polish–Lithuanian War - Wikipedia

Then, there was a Polish-Lithuanian-Teutonic war that occurred between 1409 and 1411.
Polish–Lithuanian–Teutonic War - Wikipedia

I think these engravings may be from the 1409 war. Whenever that was.

It seems as though history is set on repeat. Lincoln/Kennedy, Napoleon/Hitler. Same characters, same countries, same wars, same circumstances.

Why is there no photo of Shillingovksy is he was so important and, "nurtured a galaxy of outstanding graphic artists." if he really was alive in the 20th century?
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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KorbenDallas

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The date for this catastrophe keeps moving up. Maybe it will reach us soon. lol
Sure does, doesn't it? 1920s does sound insane.

I prefer this Shillingovsky guy in color. Was only able to find one full size image though. You can see vegetation on the column and stuff like that. Wish we could find more colored ones.

If this is really Saint Petersburg in 1920s, something is seriously off.

Saint Petersburg in ruins_10_1.jpg

Saint Petersburg in ruins_20.jpg
Why is there no photo of Shillingovksy is he was so important and, "nurtured a galaxy of outstanding graphic artists." if he really was alive in the 20th century?
Indeed, not a single one. The guy is probably a Russian version of Piranesi.
 

Searching

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Maybe you can see something here I don't:

Also interesting:
Red Planet, 1921
1540962157640.png


The painting New Planet that shows the October Revolution as the result of a cosmic catastrophe.
Konstantin Yuon - Wikipedia

October Revolution is also known as Red October. Makes me think of the Sean Connery movie.

New planet, red planet, Nibiru? Not quite what to make of it, but this red planet keeps showing up at times of destruction. Must be something to it.
 

GroundhogLfe

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I don't see complete devastation, but a destroyed building here and there. My reasoning would lean towards the civil war here due to Bolshevik takeover. Finland was pretty much granted independence because Lenin feared we could've turned the tides of that upcoming conflict especially being close to St. Petersbourgh. For us the whites won the civil war that broke out in 1918. Being independent we would not dare to interfere and it could've been seen just as a political scheming as a temporary move as a huge country could later try to get it back like they tried in WW2.

This is my understanding. But perhaps the thread will give more to question there.
 

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Magnetic

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TH Dialectic

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What in god's name is this thing? It is like a sculpture from Mars.
https://www.stolenhistory.org/attachments/44d9a9620c74fbedf15e44135b67a185-jpg.11200/
Post automatically merged:


View attachment 14854
These seem to be Rostral Columns, not sure on the official explanation from wiki.

Rostral column - Wikipedia

A rostral column is a type of victory column, originating in ancient Greece and Rome where they were erected to commemorate a naval military victory. Traditionally, rostra – the prows or rams of captured ships – were mounted on the columns. Rostral columns of the modern world include the Columbus Memorial at Columbus Circle in New York City,[1] and the paired Saint Petersburg Rostral Columns.[2]

"The Rostral Columns have become an integral part of the ensemble of the Spit of Vasilievsky Island in Saint Petersburg. They were built by the project of Thomas de Thomon simultaneously with the building of the Exchange in 1805-1810. According to tradition, that has come to us from ancient Rome, the triumphal columns adorned with the rostra of the enemy ships — rostral columns — were built up in honor of naval victories. St. Petersburg by Peter the Great’s plan was supposed to be a great port city, which would have the spirit of victory in the naval battles. The Rostral Columns have long been considered the embodiment of strength, power, vigour and might. The height of the Columns is 32 meters. The metal images of rostra are fixed on the trunks of the columns. The Brickwork and stone dresser work were made by the team of architect S. Sukhanov. Ship Rostra, naiads and anchors were struck of copper by craftsmen Shapov, Vasiliev and Korolkov. The four figures at the foot of the Rostral Columns are carved of Pudost stone. The figures are considered to be allegories of Russian rivers: the Volga and Dnieper Rivers at the northern Rostral Column, the Volkhov and Neva Rivers — at the southern one. The figure of the Dnieper River is made by master J. Chamberlain from Antwerp,the other three ones — by French F. Thibault. Initially, the Rostral Columns, were beacons for ships coming into a trading port that used to be here. At the top of the Columns are installed metal tripods with bowls: in the 19th century, oil was poured into them that lighted at dusk, and the Rostral Columns served as a beacon at the approach to the St. Petersburg seaport. Access to the bowls carried out by the spiral staircase inside the columns. Today, a fire also is ignited at the Rostral Columns, but it happens during special festivals or celebrations. Instead of oil, now is used gas, which is supplied to the metal tripod by a special tube. The restoration of the Rostral Columns took place in 1926-1928, 1947-1949 and 1998-1999. Lost metal parts were replaced with their copies. The ensemble of the Spit of Vasilievsky Island is one of the most romantic and spectacular locations of St. Petersburg. Vasilievsky Island is one of those places where lives the spirit of the Petrine era."
St. Petersburg attractions. Rostral Columns.

Again seems to be pushing the ancient Greek / Roman explanation like usual.

Historians explain that it is supposed to replicate The Rostral column of Gaius Duilius, commemorating the Roman naval victory over the Carthaginians at the Battle of Mylae in 260 BC.

Example of Duilius Column:

Screenshot 2019-01-03 at 14.57.34.png

Interesting symbolism with the horns and interwoven snakes for the woman’s bottom half.

Screenshot 2019-01-03 at 15.03.49.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echidna_(mythology) - Echinda

In Greek mythology, Echidna (/ɪˈkɪdnə/; Greek: Ἔχιδνα, "She-Viper")[2] was a monster, half-woman and half-snake, who lived alone in a cave. She was the mate of the fearsome monster Typhon and was the mother of monsters,[3] including many of the most famous monsters of Greek myth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamia - Lamia

Lamia (/ˈleɪmiə/; Greek: Λάμια), in ancient Greek mythology, was a woman who became a child-eating monster after her children were destroyed by Hera, who learned of her husband Zeus' trysts with her. Hera also afflicted Lamia with sleeplessness so she would anguish constantly, but Zeus gave her the ability to remove her own eyes.

We also see the interwoven snakes in modern allopathic medicine

Lets keep digging ...

TH
 

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asatiger1966

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I don't see complete devastation, but a destroyed building here and there. My reasoning would lean towards the civil war here due to Bolshevik takeover. Finland was pretty much granted independence because Lenin feared we could've turned the tides of that upcoming conflict especially being close to St. Petersbourgh. For us the whites won the civil war that broke out in 1918. Being independent we would not dare to interfere and it could've been seen just as a political scheming as a temporary move as a huge country could later try to get it back like they tried in WW2.

This is my understanding. But perhaps the thread will give more to question there.
The Bolsheviks were largely funded by New York City bankers. The America Government did openly support the White Army.



Foreign forces throughout Russia


The positions of the Allied expeditionary forces and of the White Armies in European Russia, 1919

Numbers of Allied soldiers who were present in the indicated regions of Russia:


  • 600 French and British troops landed in Arkhangelsk[17]
  • A number of British troops in Vladivostok
  • A number of Romanian troops in Bessarabia
  • 23,351 Greeks, who withdrew after three months (part of I Army Corps under Maj. Gen. Konstantinos Nider, comprising 2nd and 13th Infantry Divisions, in the Crimea, and around Odessa and Kherson)[18]
  • 13,000 Americans (in the Arkhangelsk and Vladivostok regions)[14][15]
  • 11,500 Estonians in northwestern Russia[12]
  • 2,500 Italians (in the Arkhangelsk region and Siberia)[19]
  • 2,300 Chinese (in the Vladivostok region)[20]
  • 150 Australians (mostly in the Arkhangelsk regions)[21]
  • 15,000 Japanese soldiers in the Eastern region
  • 4,192 Canadians in Vladivostok, 600 Canadians in Arkhangelsk[22]
 

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Paracelsus

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These seem to be Rostral Columns, not sure on the official explanation from wiki.

Rostral column - Wikipedia

A rostral column is a type of victory column, originating in ancient Greece and Rome where they were erected to commemorate a naval military victory. Traditionally, rostra – the prows or rams of captured ships – were mounted on the columns. Rostral columns of the modern world include the Columbus Memorial at Columbus Circle in New York City,[1] and the paired Saint Petersburg Rostral Columns.[2]

"The Rostral Columns have become an integral part of the ensemble of the Spit of Vasilievsky Island in Saint Petersburg. They were built by the project of Thomas de Thomon simultaneously with the building of the Exchange in 1805-1810. According to tradition, that has come to us from ancient Rome, the triumphal columns adorned with the rostra of the enemy ships — rostral columns — were built up in honor of naval victories. St. Petersburg by Peter the Great’s plan was supposed to be a great port city, which would have the spirit of victory in the naval battles. The Rostral Columns have long been considered the embodiment of strength, power, vigour and might. The height of the Columns is 32 meters. The metal images of rostra are fixed on the trunks of the columns. The Brickwork and stone dresser work were made by the team of architect S. Sukhanov. Ship Rostra, naiads and anchors were struck of copper by craftsmen Shapov, Vasiliev and Korolkov. The four figures at the foot of the Rostral Columns are carved of Pudost stone. The figures are considered to be allegories of Russian rivers: the Volga and Dnieper Rivers at the northern Rostral Column, the Volkhov and Neva Rivers — at the southern one. The figure of the Dnieper River is made by master J. Chamberlain from Antwerp,the other three ones — by French F. Thibault. Initially, the Rostral Columns, were beacons for ships coming into a trading port that used to be here. At the top of the Columns are installed metal tripods with bowls: in the 19th century, oil was poured into them that lighted at dusk, and the Rostral Columns served as a beacon at the approach to the St. Petersburg seaport. Access to the bowls carried out by the spiral staircase inside the columns. Today, a fire also is ignited at the Rostral Columns, but it happens during special festivals or celebrations. Instead of oil, now is used gas, which is supplied to the metal tripod by a special tube. The restoration of the Rostral Columns took place in 1926-1928, 1947-1949 and 1998-1999. Lost metal parts were replaced with their copies. The ensemble of the Spit of Vasilievsky Island is one of the most romantic and spectacular locations of St. Petersburg. Vasilievsky Island is one of those places where lives the spirit of the Petrine era."
St. Petersburg attractions. Rostral Columns.

Again seems to be pushing the ancient Greek / Roman explanation like usual.

Historians explain that it is supposed to replicate The Rostral column of Gaius Duilius, commemorating the Roman naval victory over the Carthaginians at the Battle of Mylae in 260 BC.

Example of Duilius Column:

View attachment 14860

Interesting symbolism with the horns and interwoven snakes for the woman’s bottom half.

View attachment 14862

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echidna_(mythology) - Echinda

In Greek mythology, Echidna (/ɪˈkɪdnə/; Greek: Ἔχιδνα, "She-Viper")[2] was a monster, half-woman and half-snake, who lived alone in a cave. She was the mate of the fearsome monster Typhon and was the mother of monsters,[3] including many of the most famous monsters of Greek myth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamia - Lamia

Lamia (/ˈleɪmiə/; Greek: Λάμια), in ancient Greek mythology, was a woman who became a child-eating monster after her children were destroyed by Hera, who learned of her husband Zeus' trysts with her. Hera also afflicted Lamia with sleeplessness so she would anguish constantly, but Zeus gave her the ability to remove her own eyes.

We also see the interwoven snakes in modern allopathic medicine

Lets keep digging ...

TH
All that's old is new again!
Do You Know The History Of The Starbucks Goddess Logo

The Siren sign of Starbucks is the Rostrum for every modern city in the west. Who knows, maybe the presence of a Starbucks is modern version of being conquered!
 

asatiger1966

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Lithuanian Castle was located in the Kolomna district of Saint Petersburg. Ruins were dismantled and replaced with residential housing (1929–30).

Category: Lithuanian prison castle
Литовский замок

I think there could be something we are not being told about 1920s Saint Petersburg. Here is a different artist: Ivan Vaulin.


Check these images out - "Return from nothingness". What the heck happened there in the 1920s?
The statue at the castle apex being repaired, is that Sun Symbology with the all seeing eye in the building gable below? And is there a connection to the Egyptian bridge.

Note: The American Generals that served in Russia might have information in their bios.
 

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GroundhogLfe

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The Bolsheviks were largely funded by New York City bankers. The America Government did openly support the White Army.



Foreign forces throughout Russia


The positions of the Allied expeditionary forces and of the White Armies in European Russia, 1919

Numbers of Allied soldiers who were present in the indicated regions of Russia:


  • 600 French and British troops landed in Arkhangelsk[17]
  • A number of British troops in Vladivostok
  • A number of Romanian troops in Bessarabia
  • 23,351 Greeks, who withdrew after three months (part of I Army Corps under Maj. Gen. Konstantinos Nider, comprising 2nd and 13th Infantry Divisions, in the Crimea, and around Odessa and Kherson)[18]
  • 13,000 Americans (in the Arkhangelsk and Vladivostok regions)[14][15]
  • 11,500 Estonians in northwestern Russia[12]
  • 2,500 Italians (in the Arkhangelsk region and Siberia)[19]
  • 2,300 Chinese (in the Vladivostok region)[20]
  • 150 Australians (mostly in the Arkhangelsk regions)[21]
  • 15,000 Japanese soldiers in the Eastern region
  • 4,192 Canadians in Vladivostok, 600 Canadians in Arkhangelsk[22]
Thanks for this as I've not had the time to go in details on this. This is giving me confirmation on the hypothesis that the gamble the Bolsheviks did paid off for the time being.

From that answer a quick off topic deduction also is that is that at least the "hydra of corruption", namely the bankers influence had not rotten the American government in full at that time.

For me this and events linked to this is one of the corner stones in recent history where all of the past events have ultimately lead forward to and how things have progressed from there. From here we should be able to find out largely the power players and find their true affiliations as it is still close enough to our current time. From there we will be able to gain a proper POV to be applied for the past events as well do they match the narrative.

The Russian revolution and the Bolshevik takeover of that revolution would indeed require an own thread around here. Even though being objective or trying to be as much as you can be, for me, from my limited POV the Bolsheviks represented *"the evil" on this earth from Lenin, Trotsky to Stalin at those times. Yet at the same time they were intriguing times that I wish I could go and experience as an observer or re-live with my current consciousness.

*It's also possible it was self manifested evil, but I'm intrigued to find more continuity for that as it was clearly an agenda long sought for.
 
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VoidTrancer

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Also interesting: Red Planet said:
New Planet[/I] that shows the October Revolution as the result of a cosmic catastrophe.
October Revolution is also known as Red October. Makes me think of the Sean Connery movie.
New planet, red planet, Nibiru? Not quite what to make of it, but this red planet keeps showing up at times of destruction. Must be something to it.
Mars to me is the Red Planet. Mars; it’s totally engrained in our culture; all I ever hear about is how we’re gonna go to mars; we’re gonna terraform mars; we’re gonna colonize Mars. Etc
What if: every time we get to mars they come down and wipers out. We keep inadvertently starting interplanetary wars!
H.G. Wells wrote war of the worlds! What if Martians I’d something to to with the Russian revolution? Didn’t the Tunguska event happen during this time? If so just more proof of nuclear weapons on Tartarian soil.
But yeah Wells wrote the history of the world right? Lots of forward thinking and fantastical ideas; what if there’s more truth there than fiction?
 
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