1893: the destruction of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago

Ishtar

Well-known member
Messages
41
Reactions
120
I wonder what is this? Found it on google but looks interesting. This looks like it's from the time when this was still a city before the civilization who occupied it destruction, with functioning steampunk robots and e.t.c.
View attachment 23779
I wonder if that’s why it is often so hard to see the faces of the “bowler hat men” in these photos? Android workers?
 

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,250
Reactions
17,005

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,250
Reactions
17,005
Have you seen this Bird's Eye View of the 1893 Columbian Exposition before? Just curious, for I don't think I have. May be I simply did not pay attention, but I had a slightly different layout in my head.

birds-eye-view-chicago-columbian-exposition-1892.jpg

I did not realize how big their dedication ceremony was. How many people do you think were present in there?
  • Dedication ceremonies for the fair were held on October 21, 1892, but the fairgrounds were not actually opened to the public until May 1, 1893
One hundred and twenty five years ago today, on October 21, 1892, marked Dedication Day of the World’s Columbian Exposition. “A surging sea of people,” reportedly “the largest assemblage that was ever brought together under one roof,” crowded into the Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building for the official ceremony. The lengthy program included several musical selections interspersed between the numerous addresses:
  1. “Columbian March” (known as “Columbus March and Hymn”) by John Knowles Paine, written by special invitation for the dedication of the fair.
  2. “The Columbus Ode” written especially for the fair by Harriet Monroe, set to music by George W. Chadwick
  3. “The Heavens Are Telling” chorus by Haydn
  4. “Hallelujah Chorus” from The Messiah by Handel
  5. “The Star Spangled Banner”
  6. “Hail Columbia”
  7. “In Praise of God” chorus by Beethoven
Performing these pieces were 5000 voices of the Columbian Chorus, under the direction of William Lawrence Tomlins, and the 190-piece Columbian Orchestra, under the direction of Theodore Thomas.
Elsewhere in the massive hall, John Philip Sousa conducted his famous band in a hopeless attempt to support the chorus and orchestra. Few of the hundred thousand or so spectators in attendance heard much of anything, as the sounds of these voices and instruments were lost in the cavernous space.

Males only?
Dedication-Shepps-Worlds-Fair-Photos-800.jpg

Source

The_World's_Columbian_exposition,_Chicago,_1893_(1893).jpg

Larger Image

On the Outside
dedicationparade.jpg

Source

Unrealized Proposals
They actually could build something like that back in 1893, so that they could turn around and get it destroyed 6 months later. Bizarre...
  • 1. Unrealized Proposal for a Massive Monument to Christopher Columbus for the Columbus Exposition of 1893, Spanning Grant Park at Congress, 1892, Chicago - artist unknown.​
Unrealized Proposal 1893.jpg

Source

  • 2. Palacio’s Plan for Colossal Monument to Columbus
    • Appearing in the October 1890 issue of Scientific American magazine, the engraving above is an artist’s rendering of the truly gigantic monument planned by the Spanish architect Alberto Palacio in honour of Christopher Columbus. The structure was designed for the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, an event to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ arrival in the New World in 1492. The globe of Palacio’s design was envisaged to be nearly 1000ft in diameter and to house a spiralling stairway circumambulating its surface – internal until the equator and then external for the northern hemisphere portion, reaching finally the north-pole where sits an enormous copy of one of Columbus’ caravel ships (whose hull would house a meteorological observatory). At night the shapes of the continents would be illuminated by a huge number of lights casting beams from below. In the base would be a statue-littered institutional complex dedicated to the natural sciences and geographical exploration, as well as a network of promenades, cafes and restaurants for the public. Not unsurprisingly Palacio’s ambitious vision was never realised as physical reality, but if it had it would have cost an estimated $6 million plus – probably something close to $7 billion in today’s money.
momumentstats1.jpg

Palacios-Sphere-Scientific-American-Oct-1890.jpg

Source
8/20/19 edit to add YT UAP video

 

Top