Russian Rulers of old

Came across a few images of the Russian tsars, czars, rulers or whatever you wanna call these individuals. I am not sure I understand at what point they were counted like that, for we appear to know certain individuals as:
Why do we have Alexander Nevsky (1221-1263) as Alexander I, and I think Alexander of Tver (1301-1339) as Alexander II?
  • Per wikipedia, Alexander of Tver was #I of Tver, and #II of Vladimir-Suzdal.
If these #'s were local, town specific enumerations, why mention them hundreds of years after the fact. Why mention these #'s for some, while not enumerating others?

ALEXANDER I NEV YAROSLAVICH.jpg

Alexander II Russian.jpg
Dmitri I Of Russia.jpg
  • Michael I - Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov (1596-1645) - Michael of Russia - enumeration is not an issue here, for he is mentioned as Michail I
    • But what's up with his looks? Was he some Tartarian khan?
Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov 2-2.jpg


Below we have a few additional images. They do not necessarily pertain to the enumeration issue, but still appear to be rather interesting.



KD: I was unable to locate the original source of these depictions. As you can see, all of them came from Alamy. The images had to come from some book, methinks, but I have no idea what that book could be.
  • If at some point Alexander Nevsky and Alexander of Tver were considered to be Alexander I and Alexander II, why were they stripped of the enumeration in favor of Alexander I and Alexander II.
  • Why did they draw Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov wearing a turban?
  • What book did these images come from?
  • What year were these images made?
  • Who produced these depictions?
May be @Cemen could clear some of these things up.
 

Silveryou

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  • Michael I - Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov (1596-1645) - Michael of Russia - enumeration is not an issue here, for he is mentioned as Michail I
    • But what's up with his looks? Was he some Tartarian khan?
Mikhail Fyodorovich Romanov 2-2.jpg
This is interesting. Michael I is labeled "Groes Schiematique", which is a reference to the Great Schism of 1054 (East–West Schism - Wikipedia). Who was the Oriental protagonist of this event? Michael I Cerularius (Michael I Cerularius - Wikipedia).
Fomenko has shown that during the 17th century the Muscovites had a "Persian look" with Arabic language and Quran elements mixed with Christian ones. A shoking example was (to me) the name of the "house of women", which was terem, strangely similar to the Muslim harem. They obviously try to hide this aspect: "The word terem is in no way linguistically related to the Arabic word harem, as was mistakenly assumed by foreign travelers to Russia during the Muscovite period, as well as nineteenth-century Russian historians who thought it to be directly derived from the Islamic practice of enclosing the female members of a household" (Terem (Russia) - Wikipedia).
 
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