Single photo: 1901 Detroit - Woodward Avenue at the Campus Martius showing Bagley Fountain.

anotherlayer

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How the rise of electricity transformed urban life in Detroit
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this seems odd to run this tower so high up (and with lights on the top???). i guess they wanted to go high so that they could run the wires down to the buildings? hmpf.

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City Lights: Austin’s Historic Moonlight Towers

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Austin’s moonlight towers have long been a distinctive part of the city’s landscape, their lights casting a gentle glow on the streets 150 feet below. Though Austin’s fifteen surviving towers are now the last of their kind, this form of street lighting was once common across the United States. Many cities erected tower lights in the 1880s and 1890s, and Austin’s system was modeled closely on Detroit’s, then the most extensive in the world.

The first practical source of electric light was essentially a sustained spark, or arc, between two carbon rods. Though highly efficient, such arc lights had a serious drawback: their glare was too intense to be endured at close range, yet there was no way to make the arc smaller without extinguishing it altogether. The carbon rods also burned down quickly; those in the first arc lights lasted just an hour or two before they had to be replaced, though later models could last through the night.

The Flag...

Different flag, same corner, photo undated, but it's the US flag.

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Is it just some weird proprietary/business flag?

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asatiger1966

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How the rise of electricity transformed urban life in Detroit
View attachment 8160

this seems odd to run this tower so high up (and with lights on the top???). i guess they wanted to go high so that they could run the wires down to the buildings? hmpf.

View attachment 8159

City Lights: Austin’s Historic Moonlight Towers

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Austin’s moonlight towers have long been a distinctive part of the city’s landscape, their lights casting a gentle glow on the streets 150 feet below. Though Austin’s fifteen surviving towers are now the last of their kind, this form of street lighting was once common across the United States. Many cities erected tower lights in the 1880s and 1890s, and Austin’s system was modeled closely on Detroit’s, then the most extensive in the world.

The first practical source of electric light was essentially a sustained spark, or arc, between two carbon rods. Though highly efficient, such arc lights had a serious drawback: their glare was too intense to be endured at close range, yet there was no way to make the arc smaller without extinguishing it altogether. The carbon rods also burned down quickly; those in the first arc lights lasted just an hour or two before they had to be replaced, though later models could last through the night.

The Flag...

Different flag, same corner, photo undated, but it's the US flag.

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Is it just some weird proprietary/business flag?

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In the street center to the right of the "Blackstone Cigar" ad sits a round kibosh with a ball on top. could it be Mercury and electricity?
What do you think that flag is, as well as what'son top of this weird tower? What else?

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The flag issue is somewhat muddled as of now. Company, charity, school, city, state, country, military? We will get to the bottom of that sooner rather later.

What is clear, Detroit sits on an unusual combination of rock, salt and water formations. This creates a type of magnet field that helps mask certain types of signals and radiation.

The people that built the Star Fort knew this. So yes energy has been generated for a long time in Detroit.

The city has many 3000 feet deep Salt mines under about 30% of Detroit.

My first trip to Detroit , 1967 ,was testing security on an underground missile base located in the city unbeknown to any civilians.

The 1880-1930 Detroit had quit interesting towers and balls.
I am presently looking for a local source of mercury.

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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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And these Roman statues all over the place. There could be only one possible explanation for those people etecting these statues. They reflected on their own lives. But imagining togas being worn in the 18th, 19th centuries is tremendously hard.
 

jd755

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There is a second moonlight tower in front and to the right of the distant steeple visible through the nearest towers framing.
There is what must be a 'bulb' hanging to the right of the wheel at the base of the tower.
There is a crane outside the 'lake' something awning in the detroit opera house with large white objects inside the fenced area which appears to be connected to the 'works' going on inside that trio of arches which look to have had their windows removed and yet the fence is arranged to allow pedestrians free passage right in front of them.

At the base of a support tower holding wires which run up to and past to the moonlight tower (the three wires are attached to the left leg of the tripod with an insulator but they go on without seemingly making a connection with the tower itself) right next to the horses standing at the taxi rank looks to me to be a transformer as its dimensions are the same or very similar to the ones the welders used in that shipyard i once worked in.
There is a man leaning against another transformer at the base of the moonlight tower itself at the end of the row of horse taxis.

As for the flag it shares letters with the sign (weirdly obscured) at the first floor level.

What i find interesting is the state of the road its immaculate. no idea what it is made of though although there are bricks of some description between the tram tracks.
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Interesting pictures and info here
Detroit as a shining example

In most American cities the lighting tower infrastructure was combined with arc lamps placed on poles or hung at intersections, and complemented with gas or and oil lamps, or incandescents. Detroit was the only large city in the US (and in the world) lighted wholly and exclusively by the tower system.

Detroit placed 122 towers (see illustration at left and at right) with a height of 100 to 180 feet, lighting 21 square miles of the city. All towers were installed in the 1880s and remained in use up to the end of the 1910s.

The lighting infrastructure in Detroit was regarded as the future of street lighting, and stood as an example for the rest of the US. The following excerpts are taken from “Municipal lighting”, a practical guide for city lighting that was published in 1888:

The press of the country has uniformly conceded Detroit to be the best-lighted city in the world. All its streets, yards, backyards and grounds are illuminated as effectually as by the full moon at the zenith. The blending of light from the mass of towers serves to prevent dense shadows.”

“There are 122 towers of 153 feet each. Detroit has about 230,000 inhabitants, and has a dense business section of about one square mile. This section has about 20 towers, which average 1,000 to 1,200 feet apart. The belt immediately contiguous, embracing the closely-built and densely shaded residence section has its towers about 2,000 feet apart. Beyond this the spaces widen to 2,500 feet apart, and in the suburbs they are spaced about 2,500 to 3,000 feet apart.”

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