Single photo: 1889 after-fire Spokane, WA

whitewave

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Are you thinking it's a missile casing? I would imagine if it were a missile that it would be sticking nose down in the ground or have a lot more debris from whatever it knocked down lying around it. What do you think it is?
 

RowOfEleven

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I don’t think it’s a missile, but what do I know about missiles?

No clue what it is, but this is 1889, can’t be too many possibilities I think.

I do have a notion that there has to be some tech involved there.

It does look like concrete on the photo, but not conclusively.

Charge igniter of solid propellant gas generator
Around full outer the edge of the rim, there seems to be a line of rivets on top of a ribbon-like piece of metal(?). It could just be one material, like concrete, but shaped in that manner as well. It also looks similar to the ribbing you find on the out edges of coins. Hard to tell from the picture quality.
 
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KorbenDallas

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I honestly think that rocket thing is just a coincidence, but I do not know.

As it stands I like the conventional gas much better. It allows to accomplish one thing with ease.

If gas was centralized, it could be an answer for how they could be blowing up entire cities.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Back to the photo. This is probably not concrete, for the perforated lid is a lid with those prior mentioned by @RowOfEleven "coin edges". A grip assist of some sort. Also on the right we have another cylinder covered by corrugated sheet metal. It appears to be the same diameter as the first one.

spokane_1889_fire_32.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Well, this is not some sort of Chicago,or New York. This is Spokane, WA in 1889. A town in the middle of nowehere

1880 - 350 people
1890 - 20,000 people

Where could they be getting gas from in Spokane in 1889?
 

PrincepAugus

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Energy
Washington is the leading producer of hydroelectric power in the U.S. Hydroelectricity makes up over half of electricity state's electric generation and nearly 35% of its total energy consumption.
Yeah, I don't see any gas there according to Wikipedia. Though they could've imported it.
With the arrival of the Northern Pacific Railroad in the late 19th century, Spokane became a transportation hub for the Inland Northwest region.[10] After the arrival of the Northern Pacific, the Union Pacific, Great Northern, and Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific railroads, Spokane became one of the most important rail centers in the western United States, being the site of four transcontinental railroads.[10][46] Spokane became an important rail and shipping center because of its location between the Rocky Mountains and the Cascade Range and between mining and farming areas (namely the Silver Valley and the Palouse).[11] As a regional shipping center, the city furnished supplies to the miners who passed through on their way to mine in the Coeur d’Alene as well as the Colville and Kootenay districts.[5] Spokane is still a major railway junction for the BNSF Railway and the Union Pacific Railroad and is the western terminus for the Montana Rail Link.[47]
 
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KorbenDallas

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Well, this find helps none. First of all, while the most of the city got annihilated by this great fire, the thing which would be prone to suffering fire damage the most (natural gas plant), survives. Therefore the official story dictates that this perforated lid on the pipe is not supposed to be gas related, though I still think it is.

But what is more interesting, this technology can not be unique to a tiny town of Spokane. Where else can we find such a pipe?

And of course, if it is a pipe, or tube of some sorts... why is it so big?
 

BStankman

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My first thought it is a cast iron drain grate, to drain a large flat roof.
But the pipe is not long enough to reach a roof, and the plate would we welded on backwards. It should indent up.
It also seems to have the same welds on the other end.

Rock sifter / salt shaker?

9ef63921-5624-44b7-aee4-994a8811e92d_400.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Not like any chimney I've ever seen.

Salt shaker was a funny one. For a water drain, it sure appears too big as well. Whatever it is, there have to be other instances somewhere.
 

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