Continent of Australia does not exist... as we know it

flameto

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Because longitude lines, unlike latitude, are not parallel.

Not sure what conclusions you can draw from that, if any. But it is interesting.
That is kinda weird. One moment it makes sense to me and another it doesn't. Maybe if I knew more about the development of navigation it would explain it.

Couldn't longitude prove/disprove flat/globe earth? In the southern hemisphere, if longitudinal lines come back together at a single southern point, we're on a globe. On the other hand, if they're found to keep expanding, it means we're on a flat surface. Does that make sense?

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crystalcat

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I watched a series of captivating videos of the two Egyptian guides of the Khemit school (Yuosef and Muhamed) translating the Gosford glyphs. They said they are authentic. There was use of certain style of glyphs that only a person of the time period would know.
This is part one.

 

JustWow

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This reply is in reference to the map you posted from 1607, by Joseph Hall. Here is what I found: Terra Australis.

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With little or no evidence to confirm its existence, a vast southern continent (Terra Australis, “land of the south”) still figured prominently on European maps from the fifteenth to eighteenth centuries. The Greek philosopher Aristotle introduced (deduced) the idea that the earth had to be balanced: the northern mass (Arctic) must have a southern counterpart. Moreover, such a continent must extend into the temperate zone. The Greek cartographer Ptolemy began to codify the concept on his influential maps by showing the Indian Ocean enclosed by Africa, India, and a southern land. Bartolomeu Dias’s rounding of Africa’s Cape of Good Hope in 1488 only pushed the continent further south in the eastern hemisphere. After Ferdinand Magellan passed through the Strait of Magellan in 1520, mapmakers considered its southern side, often called Magellanica, to be part of the landmass that they had conjectured. Willem Corneliszoon Schouten and Jacques Le Maire’s 1616 expedition around South America’s Cape Horn had a “Dias” effect on subsequent western hemisphere maps: the southern land fell further south. Before Abel Tasman sailed “under” it in 1642, Australia held promise as the temperate part of such land.

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Untitled copperplate map, 20.7 × 24.5 cm. From Joseph Hall’s Mvndvs alter et idem siue Terra Australis ante hac semper incognita longis itineribus peregrini academici nuperrime lustrata (Frankfurt, 1607?). [Rare Books Division]

Bishop Joseph Hall of Norwich, England, mocked the idea of the southern continent in his book about the discovery of a new world. His satire included this world map, in which he divided Terra Australis into areas called Tenter-belly, Shee-landt (Womandecoia), Fooliana, and Theevingen, with provinces like Eat-allia, Drink-allia, Double-sex, Asse-sex, Cocks-combaya, and Shrewes-bourg.

The hypothetical continent, named Terra Australis Incognita on many maps, continued to change shape and size—often having no distinct shorelines—as European exploration of the Pacific Ocean advanced through the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The systematic search by Captain James Cook on his second voyage in the 1770s finally proved that such land, by then greatly diminished, would only be found in the cold, uninhabitable, polar regions. That set the stage for the nineteenth- and twentieth-century European pursuit of Antarctica and the South Pole.

This is me talking now- I have tried to translate some of the words on the Hall Map- some words are Latin and some are Spanish- maybe Italian as well. I was unable to confirm that there are in fact satirical names- maybe someone else who is more familiar with these languages could help out here.
But the point I am trying to make is that main stream history is telling us that the reason these older maps have Australia and Antartica sort of mushed into one giant landmass is because "they" knew something must be there to balance the North Pole - which implies that there is/ was quite a bit of land at the North Pole, which they don't show us today. So they just drew something??
 

Flame

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That said, if @CyborgNinja, @The Kraken, @The Wack, or any other Australian forum member would like to assist with this little investigation, that would be awesome.
Glad to.

Will probably break this up into a couple of posts. Fair bit to cover. Will start with the fences.
2. Australian fences

  • The Dingo Fence of South-East Australia, 5,614 km (3,488 mi) finished in 1885
  • The Rabbit Fence of Western Australia, 3,253 km (2,021 mi), finished in 1907

While the significance of these fences will become obvious later on, I wanted to point out how comical the situation with rabbits is. The australian rabbit population today is estimated at approximately 300 million. During various times prior it allegedly reached as many as 600 millions of rabbits. And all this trouble was supposedly started in 1788 with 24 rabbits.


Rabbit moment: Rabbits were introduced to Australia by the First Fleet in 1788 and they became a problem when Thomas Austin released 24 wild rabbits for hunting purposes in October 1859, saying that "the introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting."

KD: Australian rabbits are the most inept rabbits in the world. They do not dig rabbit holes going under the rabbit-proof fence. And if they do, fence patrol quickly fills up those holes preventing the rabbits from getting on the other side to have sex.

Wild and Dingo dog moment: These two sub-species of dog were introduced to Australia at different times in Australian history. The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) was thought to have first come to Australia around 4000 years ago from Asia. Domestic dogs arrived with European settlers in 1788.

KD: Not so much about the dogs, but how stupid and inept our ancestors had to be. Clearly, the official position states that first humans arrived to Australia 48,000-70,000 years ago. The dogs arrived 4,000 years ago. Unless the dogs arrived by themselves, humans had to discover Australia 3 separate times, if you count 1606. I don't even want to go there... our ancestors could not possibly be that retarded, and neither are we today.

Fence price: both fences allegedly cost $10,000,000 a year.

Feral Camels
Apparently rabbits and dogs was not enough. Here come the camels. More than 1 million feral camels roam the Australian outback.
Camel moment: There are about 750,000 (wiki version) roaming wild in the outback and they cause a host of problems. Though various sources report number camel numbers being between 1 and 1.2 million. Camels were imported to Australia in the 19th century from Arabia, India and Afghanistan for transport and heavy work in the outback.

Welcome Signs: If camels, rabbits and dingoes don't get you, these beasts will.

KD: Everything screams - don't go on the other side of the fence.
Will start by admitting I can't really say I've ever really thought too heavily about those rabbit or dingo fences before. We did cover them briefly during History class back in high school.

I know the rabbit one was straight up 100% useless. Either the Rabbits or any of the various other local Australian marsupials capable of burrowing were more than capable of getting under it if they really wanted to.

And as you've probably already guessed, the WA rabbit fence utterly failed in it's intended duty. The rabbits had already crossed over to the Western side of the fence before they'd even finished building it in 1907, making the whole thing utterly pointless.

About the only success those fences have seen over the years is stopping the Emus and Kangaroos.

As for peak Rabbit numbers it might amuse you that back in 2009 our local ABC network made quite the ludicrous claim that by the 1920's there were estimated to be over 10 billion wild rabbits in Australia. In typical fashion they provided no links to any sources or methods used to determine how they came up with that estimate.

And as for the other beasties, yes, Australia does have some pretty dangerous wildlife. The signs are there for a reason. People often ignore the warnings and end up getting seriously injured or killed. More often than not, the dangerous creatures commonly featured on the warning signs tend to be actively aggressive, so people should stay well clear of them.
Many are poisonous, and whilst fatalities are low, you still really don't want to get bitten or stung by some of these critters as their venom causes extreme pain and a whole host of other nasty symptoms.
I'm interested to find out how easy it is to travel beyond those fences: east to west, and north to south.

While I did find a few claims of people crossing Australia North to South using a regular car (trains and planes do not count), they mean as much as Fyodor Konyukhov's claim of crossing the Pacific Ocean.

It's a far reach, but if anybody goes on vacation and wants to do some extreme driving, please consider crossing Australia by car. Below is the general route idea.

It would be very easy to get around those fences. Whilst some sections of the rabbit and dingo fences have had their heights increased over the years, I'd say that's simply to keep the Kangaroos out of the more 'at risk' farmlands. The sections of fences in the more remote regions are still just simple basic fence lines using standard dog/chicken mesh wire, pretty much the same as you'd see on the typical farm. It would be very easy to jump/climb over for an able bodied human.

On top of that, a brief search on fence patrols and maintenance came up a description saying the patrol teams apparently only monitor their assigned sections twice a week. Each patrol team is assigned to a section of around 250 kilometers of fence line. If one was to work out their patrol timetable you could easily bypass them and get across the fence. Most of these fences back on to desert or cut through some of the larger inland cattle stations so it's unlikely anyone is going to have much of a reason to go out there in the first place.

And for what it's worth, despite all the pictures of "no trespassing" signs, I have never heard of any case of anyone being arrested or fined for trespassing over either fence.

When it comes to driving, as far as East - West goes there is nothing going straight through central Australia on the level of the horizontal line in the image you've posted. Both the main routes coming out of Perth/WA into the Northern Territory or South Australia go along the Northern or Southern coastlines respectively.
When my Dad moved from Perth to Sydney back in the early 1970's, he drove the whole way along the southern route. It took him just over a week to make the trip, with a couple of stops along the way.

As far as crossing over the North-South goes, I've had several extended family members take the trip up the Stuart Highway from Adelaide to Darwin. The Stuart Highway does cut right through the central part of Australia, almost directly in line with the vertical line from your image. As an Uncle of mine has proven, the Adelaide-Darwin trip can be done in 2 days if you have multiple drivers and don't bother stopping to rest or see any sights along the way.

Lastly, I have personally made a large number of "East Coast" trips travelling along all the various highways hugging the coastline from Melbourne to Cairns, and as far as I've experienced, the East coast as it appears on the modern day maps seems to be a pretty accurate match to real life.


To wrap this post up, given the fact this site has drastically reshaped my worldview over the past few days, I'm not going to rule out any potential shenanigans by the government attempting to hide something with the Rabbit and Dingo fences, but in this case I'd say it's unlikely these fences have anything sinister behind them. They're too easy for people to cross them if they really want to.

It's more than likely these fences are just another badly thought out idea from our government - ever since Australia was first settled by Europeans those in charge of the government have had a long running track record of coming up with terrible and costly ideas to try and solve the various problems of their day. If we were lucky their efforts were simply useless, more often than not their efforts managed to cause even more problems (See "Cane toads" for a prime example).

Rather than those fences, if there really was anything sinister going on in central Australia I'd be inclined to think it would be more along the lines of secret military bases or labs or something else along those lines, hidden out in the wilderness where no-one is ever likely to go looking. Someone could easily hide away out there for many many years without anyone being the wiser.
 

WarningGuy

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Hi all im new here today and lived most of my life just outside of Melbourne. I have driven from Melbourne to Perth and back and also driven from Melbourne to Cape York North Queensland and back. What i want to say is if you look at the map of Australia they are about the same in distance from Melbourne. It was a few years ago and now wish i had of kept records of both trips but i didnt. Anyway It took easy twice as long to get to Cape York than it did to get over to Perth so work that one out.
 

Moriarty

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Hi all im new here today and lived most of my life just outside of Melbourne. I have driven from Melbourne to Perth and back and also driven from Melbourne to Cape York North Queensland and back. What i want to say is if you look at the map of Australia they are about the same in distance from Melbourne. It was a few years ago and now wish i had of kept records of both trips but i didnt. Anyway It took easy twice as long to get to Cape York than it did to get over to Perth so work that one out.
Is that equal distance as the crow flies or taking into account the roads?
 

WildFire2000

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My question about those continued border lines - why do they meet at all?
Because, on a globe, by following them north and/or south, the curvature of the roundness .. of it all. You follow them to the convergence of the ball's top and bottom.
 

Safranek

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Interesting thread. I won't comment on the maps as many have already expressed my own dilemma regarding the timelines.

Instead I am posting a couple of links to videos I found to be enlightening, once again leading back to research backing the concept of one world language in ancient times. I've watched a few documentaries on Aboriginal history in the past but I found these to be the most informative. Although it is mostly about New Zealand it's not too far from home.

Skeletons in the Cupboard Part 1; The Redheads



Skeletons in the Cupboard. Episode 2. Under The Carpet



It seems that history has been systematically altered everywhere to fit a narrative leading to confusion and ignorance. It is as if we're racing against time to put the pieces of the puzzle together and awaken a critical mass before the TPTB manage to completely close all avenues of independent research.
 

Ronan

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The road to Cape York is slower than to Perth because you aren't just on a freeway heading mostly-straight the whole time. Especially as you get near Queensland and need to detour around the mountain range. I could be wrong. Source: am from Melbourne
 

WarningGuy

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The road to Cape York is slower than to Perth because you aren't just on a freeway heading mostly-straight the whole time. Especially as you get near Queensland and need to detour around the mountain range. I could be wrong. Source: am from Melbourne
Gday Ronan i used to live in Melbourne and did the road trip 3 time to Perth and back and to twice up the Cairns. The roads are pretty good driving up north now to what they used to be and yes it is a bit more driving involved but why is it then it takes twice as long to get to Cairns as it does to get to Perth ? I also use the inland roads as its a lot quicker. It should not take twice as long and that it does. The only thing i think it might be is the Peters World Atlas is closer to the mark than the one we are shown.
 

Jim Duyer

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This is officially the most coo coo jumbo-crazy thing I have written to date. If anything, it is going to be an entertaining piece of reading for you. I am planning to question the geographical accuracy of the layout of the continent of Australia. I do understand how bananas it sounds, for I plan on exposing some inconsistencies, and bizarre circumstances surrounding the continent you can see below. As a result, I will present Australia as a part of a much bigger piece of land, known today as Antarctica.

It is going to be a rather convoluted hypothesis for right now. Hopefully, with time things will become less murky.


To make it clear: of course Australia exists as far as people living there, and cities/towns go. Which means we do have Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, etc. But the layout of the continent of Australia is misrepresented.

KD version of Australia
(preliminary)

1587 Urbano Monte's World Map
View attachment 5002

Some of the known facts about Australia

  • Initial settlement: 48,000 and 70,000 years ago
  • European discovery: 1606 by the Dutch. Initially mapped and named New Holland
  • Land Size: 2,969,907 sq mi, or 7,692,024 sq km
  • 2018 population: 25,010,300
Australia vs. USA
25,010,300 ppl vs. 326,766,748 ppl

This is how big Australia is

View attachment 5018

Population Map

View attachment 4953

Emphasis Points
1. Endemic Enimals
2. Animal Fences
3. Egyptian Hieroglyphs
4. Maps
5. Time Zones
6. Malaysia Flight 370 path
7. North-South Flights
8. Antarctica restrictions
9. Admiral Richard E. Byrd interview


1. Endemic animals
The fauna of Australia consists of a huge variety of animals; some 83% of mammals, 89% of reptiles, 24% of fish and insects and 93% of amphibians that inhabit the continent are endemic to Australia. Australia probably has between 200,000 and 300,000 species, about 100,000 of which have been described.

KD: That is a lot of unique animals native to Australia only. This is only possible if you believe in the theory of evolution. Any other way requires an unpleasant explanation.


  • The Dingo Fence of South-East Australia, 5,614 km (3,488 mi) finished in 1885
  • The Rabbit Fence of Western Australia, 3,253 km (2,021 mi), finished in 1907

While the significance of these fences will become obvious later on, I wanted to point out how comical the situation with rabbits is. The australian rabbit population today is estimated at approximately 300 million. During various times prior it allegedly reached as many as 600 millions of rabbits. And all this trouble was supposedly started in 1788 with 24 rabbits.


Rabbit moment: Rabbits were introduced to Australia by the First Fleet in 1788 and they became a problem when Thomas Austin released 24 wild rabbits for hunting purposes in October 1859, saying that "the introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting."

KD: Australian rabbits are the most inept rabbits in the world. They do not dig rabbit holes going under the rabbit-proof fence. And if they do, fence patrol quickly fills up those holes preventing the rabbits from getting on the other side to have sex.

Wild and Dingo dog moment: These two sub-species of dog were introduced to Australia at different times in Australian history. The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) was thought to have first come to Australia around 4000 years ago from Asia. Domestic dogs arrived with European settlers in 1788.

KD: Not so much about the dogs, but how stupid and inept our ancestors had to be. Clearly, the official position states that first humans arrived to Australia 48,000-70,000 years ago. The dogs arrived 4,000 years ago. Unless the dogs arrived by themselves, humans had to discover Australia 3 separate times, if you count 1606. I don't even want to go there... our ancestors could not possibly be that retarded, and neither are we today.

Fence price: both fences allegedly cost $10,000,000 a year.

Feral Camels
Apparently rabbits and dogs was not enough. Here come the camels. More than 1 million feral camels roam the Australian outback.
Camel moment: There are about 750,000 (wiki version) roaming wild in the outback and they cause a host of problems. Though various sources report number camel numbers being between 1 and 1.2 million. Camels were imported to Australia in the 19th century from Arabia, India and Afghanistan for transport and heavy work in the outback.

Welcome Signs: If camels, rabbits and dingoes don't get you, these beasts will.

KD: Everything screams - don't go on the other side of the fence.

3. Egyptian Hieroglyphs
According to local residents that have had the opportunity to see and study these hieroglyphs, they seem to be extremely ancient, written in the archaic style of the early dynasties, a style that has been studied very little and is untranslatable by most Egyptologists who have learned to read Middle Egyptian upward. According to the information provided to us, there is only a handful of people on Earth who can actually read and translate this early writing system, making them seem even more valuable to history.
- 5.000 year old Egyptian hieroglyphs found in Australia?
- This is what the 5,000-year-old ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs in Australia say
- There has been a controversial discovery of hieroglyphs in Australia

KD: For me it signifies the presence of the Global Civilization, rather then Ancient Egyptians traveling to Australia.

4. Older maps
The below maps are dated between 1507 and 1787. Australia was allegedly discovered by Europeans in 1606.

Apart from accusing individuals, who were able to map the entire known World, in being incompetent... what is the reason for today's Australia to be absent on these maps (especially on the ones made well after 1606)? Looking at the above maps with proper attention, one will notice, that the southern continent "Terra Australis" is not some place holder, but rather has a very specific land line and various locations.

5. Time Zones
This is the weakest part of all. Australia uses three main time zones: Australian Western Standard Time, Australian Central Standard Time, and Australian Eastern Standard Time.

Though the image below,
and on Wiki, shows that we have 8pm, 9pm, 10pm, and 11pm at the same time. The time zone break down below suggests to me that the continent could be a bit wider, meaning East to West.

China is an interesting country, for it entirely fits within one time zone. Wonder what the true reason is.

While the Time Zone issue is the weakest point of the entire topic, primarily due to some other countries having a somewhat similar situation (for example the United States) it does raise a few questions.

As you can see below (Australia), even official sources do not agree with each other.
View attachment 5019

How accurate is the entire world map layout?... being one of those. Apart from the official gibberish, what prevents us from simply using Longitude to assign time zones? What is the true reason for this complexity? This is a topic for some other thread.

6. Malaysia Flight 370 path

View attachment 5003
While the official version states, "Cause unknown, some debris found", it was highly disputed, and there was never any conclusive concrete evidence of the aircraft located. The disappearance of MH370 produced multiple conspiracy theories pertaining to its fate.

KD: The Flight MH370 headed South, and landed safely on one of the continents not included on the traditional globe model.

7. North-South Flights over the Antarctica
The lack of flights over the Antarctica is explained with its remoteness, no emergency landing opportunities and a multitude of other reasons. Whether there could be alternate reasons for not flying North-South is up to the reader of this article. Google has plenty of those.

View attachment 5005

8. Antarctic Treaty System - ATS
ATS expires in 2048

Antarctica is the Earth’s only continent without a native human population, and no one country can claim to own it. Unique in the world, it is a land dedicated to science and all nations. The treaty sets aside Antarctica as a scientific preserve, establishes freedom of scientific investigation and bans military activity on the continent. The treaty entered into force in 1961 and currently has 53 parties.


The treaty sets aside Antarctica as a scientific preserve, establishes freedom of scientific investigation and bans military activity on the continent.

Oxymoronic: Because the Antarctic Treaty, which came into effect on June 23, 1961, bans military activity in Antarctica, military personnel and equipment may only be used for scientific research or any other peaceful purpose on the continent.

Can you explore on your own? Appears so but... No planes. No boats. No motorized vehicles. No dogs! Carry your own poop – with a permit! Listen to the related podcast.

KD: the only place on Earth they do not drill for Crude Oil.
KD 2: Bogus cruise trips are available for $10k a pop.

9. Admiral Richard E. Byrd interview
Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd (1888 – 1957) was an American naval officer and explorer. He was a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the highest honor for valor given by the United States, and was a pioneering American aviator, polar explorer, and organizer of polar logistics. Aircraft flights in which he served as a navigator and expedition leader crossed the Atlantic Ocean, a segment of the Arctic Ocean, and a segment of the Antarctic Plateau. Byrd claimed that his expeditions had been the first to reach both the North Pole and the South Pole by air. However, his claim to have reached the North Pole is disputed.


He is not being taken seriously these days because... why would he be taken seriously? He stated some outlandishly crazy things, when considered from the dogmatic point of view. Some of those things could be considered sensational. Why these esteemed gentleman would lie to us, is beyond me. Please listen to his short interview below, and make your own opinion of what he means.

Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd Jr., USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was an American naval officer who specialized in feats of exploration. He was a recipient of the Medal of Honor, the highest honor for valor given by the United States, and was a pioneering American aviator, polar explorer, and organizer of polar logistics. Additional information on Richard Byrd can be obtained on Wikipedia or Britannica.




* * * * *
KD Summary: This hypothesis is pretty weak so far. Though I did not mention Nazi Ahnenerbe, and their Neuschwabenland; the World dignitaries visiting Antarctica were not mentioned either. Both are an integral part of the Antarctic mystery.

First humans arrived to Australia 48,000-70,000 years ago. The dingoes first came to Australia around 4000 years ago from Asia (either by themselves or humans kept on arriving?). Europeans discovered Australia in 1606. What's wrong with this picture?

In my little map allegedly re-copied in 1587 by Urbano Monte we can see Camels, Rabbits, Dogs, Crocodiles and other creatures. Same mentioned animals are in abundance on the Australian continent today. The continent of Australia was discovered in 1606 according to the official scientific version. This looks like an interesting coincidence at the very least. I did not find any kangaroos, but those are not the only Australian animals not depicted on the Monte's map.


Also, the uniqueness of the animal species suggests that there was either a major genetic modification conducted there, or the species belong to an outside land mass to which we are only partially privy to. The other option would be the traditional evolution.

At the same time I do not 100% agree with my own map here. Just like I said, my concept is pretty weak so far. I do think that Australia is a part of the Antarctic land circle.


This is not a Flat Earth discussion. Please, do not turn this topic into a Flat Earth thing. I will say that the Earth does not have to be flat for us to live on a flat surface. I do think that we are limited by our dogmatic spherical constraints allowing for no additional land masses. The World we live in just might end up being MUCH BIGGER than what we were allowed to enjoy.

That said, if @CyborgNinja, @The Kraken, @The Wack, or any other Australian forum member would like to assist with this little investigation, that would be awesome.

Sad humor: This rabbit fence sounds way too ridiculous. If rabbits are such sex monsters, it is hardly believable that a couple of them maniacs did not sneak out for some hanky-panky action on the western side of the fence.


I'm interested to find out how easy it is to travel beyond those fences: east to west, and north to south.

While I did find a few claims of people crossing Australia North to South using a regular car (trains and planes do not count), they mean as much as Fyodor Konyukhov's claim of crossing the Pacific Ocean.

It's a far reach, but if anybody goes on vacation and wants to do some extreme driving, please consider crossing Australia by car. Below is the general route idea.

View attachment 5015

The shape of the Earth is unknown

There were some Russian classified 1948 documents available to the US intelligence which directly stated that the shape of the Earth is unknown. I do not know what the source of the docs is. I just cut out a couple screens from this video. This video has tons of government docs in it which make you wonder.

Actually I have done quite a bit of research on the discovery of Australia. I believe that I can prove that it was originally discovered by Celts, in about 285 - 275 BC. They were part of the bodyguard group for the Greek Pharoah, and when discovered rifling through his famous library collection, they were sentenced to banishment on an island in the north of Egypt. I have translated markings from caves in the area, and they are most definitely from that time and people.
 

Eternity13

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I have driven all around Australia - literally. I have done East to West three times , up the middle twice, around the outside on the East Coast several times, North to South on the west coast once. You can do West to East in around 4 days (3,900km / 2,500 miles approx) and North to South in about the same time (4,440km / 2748 miles). To cover that much distance in four days means some hard core driving. Not that it is much fun doing it that way. I did most of my traveling by myself with several children so took me a bit longer but we would still do about 10 hours driving a day and cover some serious distances. By myself I could do 2,800km in a day and a half.
I know husbands and wives (with kids) who do West to East in less than three days by driving in shifts almost non stop = fun factor zero in my opinion but they are pretty chill like it is no big deal and reckon it is the only way to do it.
I have a friend who did several hundred km of the Rabbit Fence - it is in the middle of nowhere basically so unless you have a hard core 4 wheel drive, several spare tyres and lots of water but for the average person it is pretty much a no go zone with temps 40 - 50 degrees.

Some borders are marked. Some borders are patrolled and you have to stop and throw away fruit/honey/veges due to bringing in bugs / bacteria / fungus (which is nonsensical to me). There are different road rules so if you cross the border where the speed limit changes for towing vehicles there will be a sign up pertaining to that letting you know you. Mostly it is pretty much a non event when you 'cross the borders'. I drove Darwin to Albany - North to South, and would not see one single other car for 10 hours of driving. There were road 'trains' - trucks with up to 4 huge trailers - they are not allowed in suburban areas only in the Outback (the name of remote deserted areas of Australia).

Just cause I have driven it doesn't really prove anything other than it IS truly huge. I think the whole seven continents story is just that - a story. As a side note, there are stories around that New Zealand has shifted position but it would have to have taken place before 1950's as my family (my parents) and I have been traveling between the two since then and the distances/times remain the same. I am skeptical of the Mandela affect. I have driven from the tip of the North Island of New Zealand to bottom of the South Island. My sister recently walked from the tip of the North Island to the bottom of the South Island of New Zealand.

The red lines depict (roughly) the routes I have driven.

Inkedmap_of_australia_LI smaller size.jpg
 

Jim Duyer

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Right off the bat I can say without a doubt that these Hieroglyphs are fake. They appeared one day and had since had many additions made. I studied Hieroglyphs while I was investigating this particular site a few years ago and I can tell you there grammar and format are wrong. At least for known Hieroglyphic uses from Egypt. Its just random symbols arrange haphazardly.

As for the shape of Australia I would not rule out a distortion. Terra Australis incognita was the idea that there was an equal sized landmass in the southern hemisphere. This theory would answer that. Great article.
Some of them seem to represent something more than random symbols, but I agree 100% that they were faked. They look like phrases from books stitched together to give the appearance of a message, but they do not.
Post automatically merged:

I have driven all around Australia - literally. I have done East to West three times , up the middle twice, around the outside on the East Coast several times, North to South on the west coast once. You can do West to East in around 4 days (3,900km / 2,500 miles approx) and North to South in about the same time (4,440km / 2748 miles). To cover that much distance in four days means some hard core driving. Not that it is much fun doing it that way. I did most of my traveling by myself with several children so took me a bit longer but we would still do about 10 hours driving a day and cover some serious distances. By myself I could do 2,800km in a day and a half.
I know husbands and wives (with kids) who do West to East in less than three days by driving in shifts almost non stop = fun factor zero in my opinion but they are pretty chill like it is no big deal and reckon it is the only way to do it.
I have a friend who did several hundred km of the Rabbit Fence - it is in the middle of nowhere basically so unless you have a hard core 4 wheel drive, several spare tyres and lots of water but for the average person it is pretty much a no go zone with temps 40 - 50 degrees.

Some borders are marked. Some borders are patrolled and you have to stop and throw away fruit/honey/veges due to bringing in bugs / bacteria / fungus (which is nonsensical to me). There are different road rules so if you cross the border where the speed limit changes for towing vehicles there will be a sign up pertaining to that letting you know you. Mostly it is pretty much a non event when you 'cross the borders'. I drove Darwin to Albany - North to South, and would not see one single other car for 10 hours of driving. There were road 'trains' - trucks with up to 4 huge trailers - they are not allowed in suburban areas only in the Outback (the name of remote deserted areas of Australia).

Just cause I have driven it doesn't really prove anything other than it IS truly huge. I think the whole seven continents story is just that - a story. As a side note, there are stories around that New Zealand has shifted position but it would have to have taken place before 1950's as my family (my parents) and I have been traveling between the two since then and the distances/times remain the same. I am skeptical of the Mandela affect. I have driven from the tip of the North Island of New Zealand to bottom of the South Island. My sister recently walked from the tip of the North Island to the bottom of the South Island of New Zealand.

The red lines depict (roughly) the routes I have driven.

View attachment 25193
I also drove from Sydney to Cairns, in 1984. Big country, but not too many people actually drive the east to west portion, as you have, unless they live there and have a need to.
 

Samson4prez

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Lol. Those solar panels are curved. It’s a fake CGI in my opinion.
Definitely a fish eye lens like everything seen in space... It makes the horizon look curved... If you stare out over the ocean it looks curved but thats because of are eyes... Pictures tell a different story.
 

Tool18

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I really would like to understand the reasoning behind this because I have literally travelled all round Australia. I go to a lot doof festivals and they take me everywhere. I also have done Brisbane to Adelaide and back a countless number of times. The place is HUGE! I moved here from england snd it truly is massive. I still get surprised at how big it is. and when you go inland past the mountain ranges its unbelievable how flat it is out there, feel like you can see forever (I am not a flat earther).

I have driven to west before from Brisbane but Ill never do that again. hit a kangaroo on the way and fucked my front end up. It is just such a long drive its brutal. I can do some long drives but that is a brutal one.
 

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