Continent of Australia does not exist... as we know it

flameto

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Because longitude lines, unlike latitude, are not parallel.

Not sure what conclusions you can draw from that, if any. But it is interesting.
That is kinda weird. One moment it makes sense to me and another it doesn't. Maybe if I knew more about the development of navigation it would explain it.

Couldn't longitude prove/disprove flat/globe earth? In the southern hemisphere, if longitudinal lines come back together at a single southern point, we're on a globe. On the other hand, if they're found to keep expanding, it means we're on a flat surface. Does that make sense?

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crystalcat

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I watched a series of captivating videos of the two Egyptian guides of the Khemit school (Yuosef and Muhamed) translating the Gosford glyphs. They said they are authentic. There was use of certain style of glyphs that only a person of the time period would know.
This is part one.

 

JustWow

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This reply is in reference to the map you posted from 1607, by Joseph Hall. Here is what I found: Terra Australis.

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With little or no evidence to confirm its existence, a vast southern continent (Terra Australis, “land of the south”) still figured prominently on European maps from the fifteenth to eighteenth centuries. The Greek philosopher Aristotle introduced (deduced) the idea that the earth had to be balanced: the northern mass (Arctic) must have a southern counterpart. Moreover, such a continent must extend into the temperate zone. The Greek cartographer Ptolemy began to codify the concept on his influential maps by showing the Indian Ocean enclosed by Africa, India, and a southern land. Bartolomeu Dias’s rounding of Africa’s Cape of Good Hope in 1488 only pushed the continent further south in the eastern hemisphere. After Ferdinand Magellan passed through the Strait of Magellan in 1520, mapmakers considered its southern side, often called Magellanica, to be part of the landmass that they had conjectured. Willem Corneliszoon Schouten and Jacques Le Maire’s 1616 expedition around South America’s Cape Horn had a “Dias” effect on subsequent western hemisphere maps: the southern land fell further south. Before Abel Tasman sailed “under” it in 1642, Australia held promise as the temperate part of such land.

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Untitled copperplate map, 20.7 × 24.5 cm. From Joseph Hall’s Mvndvs alter et idem siue Terra Australis ante hac semper incognita longis itineribus peregrini academici nuperrime lustrata (Frankfurt, 1607?). [Rare Books Division]

Bishop Joseph Hall of Norwich, England, mocked the idea of the southern continent in his book about the discovery of a new world. His satire included this world map, in which he divided Terra Australis into areas called Tenter-belly, Shee-landt (Womandecoia), Fooliana, and Theevingen, with provinces like Eat-allia, Drink-allia, Double-sex, Asse-sex, Cocks-combaya, and Shrewes-bourg.

The hypothetical continent, named Terra Australis Incognita on many maps, continued to change shape and size—often having no distinct shorelines—as European exploration of the Pacific Ocean advanced through the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The systematic search by Captain James Cook on his second voyage in the 1770s finally proved that such land, by then greatly diminished, would only be found in the cold, uninhabitable, polar regions. That set the stage for the nineteenth- and twentieth-century European pursuit of Antarctica and the South Pole.

This is me talking now- I have tried to translate some of the words on the Hall Map- some words are Latin and some are Spanish- maybe Italian as well. I was unable to confirm that there are in fact satirical names- maybe someone else who is more familiar with these languages could help out here.
But the point I am trying to make is that main stream history is telling us that the reason these older maps have Australia and Antartica sort of mushed into one giant landmass is because "they" knew something must be there to balance the North Pole - which implies that there is/ was quite a bit of land at the North Pole, which they don't show us today. So they just drew something??
 

Flame

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That said, if @CyborgNinja, @The Kraken, @The Wack, or any other Australian forum member would like to assist with this little investigation, that would be awesome.
Glad to.

Will probably break this up into a couple of posts. Fair bit to cover. Will start with the fences.
2. Australian fences

  • The Dingo Fence of South-East Australia, 5,614 km (3,488 mi) finished in 1885
  • The Rabbit Fence of Western Australia, 3,253 km (2,021 mi), finished in 1907

While the significance of these fences will become obvious later on, I wanted to point out how comical the situation with rabbits is. The australian rabbit population today is estimated at approximately 300 million. During various times prior it allegedly reached as many as 600 millions of rabbits. And all this trouble was supposedly started in 1788 with 24 rabbits.


Rabbit moment: Rabbits were introduced to Australia by the First Fleet in 1788 and they became a problem when Thomas Austin released 24 wild rabbits for hunting purposes in October 1859, saying that "the introduction of a few rabbits could do little harm and might provide a touch of home, in addition to a spot of hunting."

KD: Australian rabbits are the most inept rabbits in the world. They do not dig rabbit holes going under the rabbit-proof fence. And if they do, fence patrol quickly fills up those holes preventing the rabbits from getting on the other side to have sex.

Wild and Dingo dog moment: These two sub-species of dog were introduced to Australia at different times in Australian history. The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) was thought to have first come to Australia around 4000 years ago from Asia. Domestic dogs arrived with European settlers in 1788.

KD: Not so much about the dogs, but how stupid and inept our ancestors had to be. Clearly, the official position states that first humans arrived to Australia 48,000-70,000 years ago. The dogs arrived 4,000 years ago. Unless the dogs arrived by themselves, humans had to discover Australia 3 separate times, if you count 1606. I don't even want to go there... our ancestors could not possibly be that retarded, and neither are we today.

Fence price: both fences allegedly cost $10,000,000 a year.

Feral Camels
Apparently rabbits and dogs was not enough. Here come the camels. More than 1 million feral camels roam the Australian outback.
Camel moment: There are about 750,000 (wiki version) roaming wild in the outback and they cause a host of problems. Though various sources report number camel numbers being between 1 and 1.2 million. Camels were imported to Australia in the 19th century from Arabia, India and Afghanistan for transport and heavy work in the outback.

Welcome Signs: If camels, rabbits and dingoes don't get you, these beasts will.

KD: Everything screams - don't go on the other side of the fence.
Will start by admitting I can't really say I've ever really thought too heavily about those rabbit or dingo fences before. We did cover them briefly during History class back in high school.

I know the rabbit one was straight up 100% useless. Either the Rabbits or any of the various other local Australian marsupials capable of burrowing were more than capable of getting under it if they really wanted to.

And as you've probably already guessed, the WA rabbit fence utterly failed in it's intended duty. The rabbits had already crossed over to the Western side of the fence before they'd even finished building it in 1907, making the whole thing utterly pointless.

About the only success those fences have seen over the years is stopping the Emus and Kangaroos.

As for peak Rabbit numbers it might amuse you that back in 2009 our local ABC network made quite the ludicrous claim that by the 1920's there were estimated to be over 10 billion wild rabbits in Australia. In typical fashion they provided no links to any sources or methods used to determine how they came up with that estimate.

And as for the other beasties, yes, Australia does have some pretty dangerous wildlife. The signs are there for a reason. People often ignore the warnings and end up getting seriously injured or killed. More often than not, the dangerous creatures commonly featured on the warning signs tend to be actively aggressive, so people should stay well clear of them.
Many are poisonous, and whilst fatalities are low, you still really don't want to get bitten or stung by some of these critters as their venom causes extreme pain and a whole host of other nasty symptoms.
I'm interested to find out how easy it is to travel beyond those fences: east to west, and north to south.

While I did find a few claims of people crossing Australia North to South using a regular car (trains and planes do not count), they mean as much as Fyodor Konyukhov's claim of crossing the Pacific Ocean.

It's a far reach, but if anybody goes on vacation and wants to do some extreme driving, please consider crossing Australia by car. Below is the general route idea.

It would be very easy to get around those fences. Whilst some sections of the rabbit and dingo fences have had their heights increased over the years, I'd say that's simply to keep the Kangaroos out of the more 'at risk' farmlands. The sections of fences in the more remote regions are still just simple basic fence lines using standard dog/chicken mesh wire, pretty much the same as you'd see on the typical farm. It would be very easy to jump/climb over for an able bodied human.

On top of that, a brief search on fence patrols and maintenance came up a description saying the patrol teams apparently only monitor their assigned sections twice a week. Each patrol team is assigned to a section of around 250 kilometers of fence line. If one was to work out their patrol timetable you could easily bypass them and get across the fence. Most of these fences back on to desert or cut through some of the larger inland cattle stations so it's unlikely anyone is going to have much of a reason to go out there in the first place.

And for what it's worth, despite all the pictures of "no trespassing" signs, I have never heard of any case of anyone being arrested or fined for trespassing over either fence.

When it comes to driving, as far as East - West goes there is nothing going straight through central Australia on the level of the horizontal line in the image you've posted. Both the main routes coming out of Perth/WA into the Northern Territory or South Australia go along the Northern or Southern coastlines respectively.
When my Dad moved from Perth to Sydney back in the early 1970's, he drove the whole way along the southern route. It took him just over a week to make the trip, with a couple of stops along the way.

As far as crossing over the North-South goes, I've had several extended family members take the trip up the Stuart Highway from Adelaide to Darwin. The Stuart Highway does cut right through the central part of Australia, almost directly in line with the vertical line from your image. As an Uncle of mine has proven, the Adelaide-Darwin trip can be done in 2 days if you have multiple drivers and don't bother stopping to rest or see any sights along the way.

Lastly, I have personally made a large number of "East Coast" trips travelling along all the various highways hugging the coastline from Melbourne to Cairns, and as far as I've experienced, the East coast as it appears on the modern day maps seems to be a pretty accurate match to real life.


To wrap this post up, given the fact this site has drastically reshaped my worldview over the past few days, I'm not going to rule out any potential shenanigans by the government attempting to hide something with the Rabbit and Dingo fences, but in this case I'd say it's unlikely these fences have anything sinister behind them. They're too easy for people to cross them if they really want to.

It's more than likely these fences are just another badly thought out idea from our government - ever since Australia was first settled by Europeans those in charge of the government have had a long running track record of coming up with terrible and costly ideas to try and solve the various problems of their day. If we were lucky their efforts were simply useless, more often than not their efforts managed to cause even more problems (See "Cane toads" for a prime example).

Rather than those fences, if there really was anything sinister going on in central Australia I'd be inclined to think it would be more along the lines of secret military bases or labs or something else along those lines, hidden out in the wilderness where no-one is ever likely to go looking. Someone could easily hide away out there for many many years without anyone being the wiser.
 

WarningGuy

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Hi all im new here today and lived most of my life just outside of Melbourne. I have driven from Melbourne to Perth and back and also driven from Melbourne to Cape York North Queensland and back. What i want to say is if you look at the map of Australia they are about the same in distance from Melbourne. It was a few years ago and now wish i had of kept records of both trips but i didnt. Anyway It took easy twice as long to get to Cape York than it did to get over to Perth so work that one out.
 

Moriarty

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Hi all im new here today and lived most of my life just outside of Melbourne. I have driven from Melbourne to Perth and back and also driven from Melbourne to Cape York North Queensland and back. What i want to say is if you look at the map of Australia they are about the same in distance from Melbourne. It was a few years ago and now wish i had of kept records of both trips but i didnt. Anyway It took easy twice as long to get to Cape York than it did to get over to Perth so work that one out.
Is that equal distance as the crow flies or taking into account the roads?
 

WildFire2000

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My question about those continued border lines - why do they meet at all?
Because, on a globe, by following them north and/or south, the curvature of the roundness .. of it all. You follow them to the convergence of the ball's top and bottom.
 

Safranek

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Interesting thread. I won't comment on the maps as many have already expressed my own dilemma regarding the timelines.

Instead I am posting a couple of links to videos I found to be enlightening, once again leading back to research backing the concept of one world language in ancient times. I've watched a few documentaries on Aboriginal history in the past but I found these to be the most informative. Although it is mostly about New Zealand it's not too far from home.

Skeletons in the Cupboard Part 1; The Redheads



Skeletons in the Cupboard. Episode 2. Under The Carpet



It seems that history has been systematically altered everywhere to fit a narrative leading to confusion and ignorance. It is as if we're racing against time to put the pieces of the puzzle together and awaken a critical mass before the TPTB manage to completely close all avenues of independent research.
 

Ronan

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The road to Cape York is slower than to Perth because you aren't just on a freeway heading mostly-straight the whole time. Especially as you get near Queensland and need to detour around the mountain range. I could be wrong. Source: am from Melbourne
 

WarningGuy

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The road to Cape York is slower than to Perth because you aren't just on a freeway heading mostly-straight the whole time. Especially as you get near Queensland and need to detour around the mountain range. I could be wrong. Source: am from Melbourne
Gday Ronan i used to live in Melbourne and did the road trip 3 time to Perth and back and to twice up the Cairns. The roads are pretty good driving up north now to what they used to be and yes it is a bit more driving involved but why is it then it takes twice as long to get to Cairns as it does to get to Perth ? I also use the inland roads as its a lot quicker. It should not take twice as long and that it does. The only thing i think it might be is the Peters World Atlas is closer to the mark than the one we are shown.
 

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