William Shakespeare was a Jewish, mulatto girl who got caught up in Tartarian history

Qmeta

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Aemilia Bassano Lanyer, who was born in the year 1569 in London. She was a Jewish, mulatto woman who was fluent in Italian, Hebrew, Latin, Greek, and English. She is better known as William Shakespeare.

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The song most-mentioned in her work as 'William Shakespeare' is ‘'King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid" (mentioned 4 times in her works), which is a song in which a king falls in love with a young black girl from the streets. The song was about her, and although she grew up in court, she was not as noble as the married man she loved; a cousin of Queen Elizabeth I named Lord Hunsdon.

Lord Hunsdon was the patron of Lord Chamberlain's Men, William Shakespeare's playing company. He was the man in charge of English theatre. Born Henry Carey, he was the illegitimate child of King Henry VIII. She wrote many plays about his family, such as Henry the 6th, Henry the 4th, Henry the 5th, and Henry the 8th, all while she was still a teenager. As Shakespeare, she dedicated many of her sonnets to "Mr. WH", which stands for 'Mr. Willow Hunsdon'. (Willough was her nickname, from the manor she stayed at from the time she was seven, called Willoughby.) He was the person that she could secretly submit her manuscripts through to the theatre without divulging her identity. It also helped that she had 15 relatives involved with music for theatre, including a close relative who was the musical director for her plays.

Aemilia would often pen her pseudonym as 'William Shakes-peare', which is kind of odd but is an obvious play on words. It is an anagram that ultimately means “A. Willow Speaks-Here”. 'William' is the masculine version of her nickname (Willow). Publishing a book under her own name would have been scandalous. As a Jew and a female, publishing the feminist and anti-Christian tones often found in her work would have unquestionably meant her execution..

Her pseudonym would also sometimes be printed as 'Wil. Shakespeare'

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She would often put her own name, in variations, in her work or the names of those that she knew. For example, in Titus Andronicus there are characters called Emillius and Bassianus. In Othello,

Her most famous play, Romeo and Juliet, was a story about her relationship with someone she loved and had to leave when she was a young teenager. She was Juliet (a Jew) and he was Romeo (a non-Jew who lived in Rome). Throughout the 16th century, Jews gradually moved from the south of Italy to the north, with conditions worsening for Jews in Rome after 1556 and Venice in the 1580s. Her family moved to Venice.

In Sonnet 127, she talks about her affair with Lord Hunsdon, the 'bastard' in it:

In the old age black was not counted fair,
Or if it were it bore not beauty's name;
But now is black beauty's successive heir,
And beauty slandered with a bastard shame:

The likeness of 'William Shakespeare' is Lord Hunsdon himself. (The earring that he wears in the drawing was her idea.)

lord_hunsdon.jpg
 

sonoman

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hey Qmeta, thats some pretty serious hearsay you got there! anything verifiable with it? Im more inclined to accept the hearsay that Francis Bacon most often used the pen name " William Shakespeare" but I cant confirm or deny there was more or less than one rose in that garden.

Aemilia would often pen her pseudonym as 'William Shakes-peare', which is kind of odd but is an obvious play on words. It is an anagram that ultimately means “A. Willow Speaks-Here”. 'William' is the masculine version of her nickname (Willow).
my decoder ring came up with "Will (where there is a will, there is a way)

WILL I AM

Shakes Spear,

ever notice while youre writing something how the pen seems to shake? or have you read before somewhere that 'the pen is mightier than the sword'

(S-word). perhaps of a PenDragon? a pen drag on paper, maybe?

also "shaking spears" (@ ignorance) is a fighting gesture, no?

but its always good to add more hearsay to the fires of endless hearsays I imagine. lol
 
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Qmeta

Qmeta

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hey Qmeta, thats some pretty serious hearsay you got there! anything verifiable with it? Im more inclined to accept the hearsay that Francis Bacon most often used the pen name " William Shakespeare" but I cant confirm or deny there was more or less than one rose in that garden.



my decoder ring came up with "Will (where there is a will, there is a way)

WILL I AM

Shakes Spear,

ever notice while youre writing something how the pen seems to shake? or have you read before somewhere that 'the pen is mightier than the sword'

(S-word). perhaps of a PenDragon? a pen drag on paper, maybe?

also "shaking spears" (@ ignorance) is a fighting gesture, no?

but its always good to add more hearsay to the fires of endless hearsays I imagine. lol
Sure. In fact, someone wrote 18 pages on it: http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/wp-content/uploads/Oxfordian2009_Hudson_Bassano.pdf
 

sonoman

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thanks,

from that last page "as the key collaborator in the 'Shakesprearean' works"

much easier to swallow than what your thread title presents us. still, interesting none the less.

in deed, many people have The Will to Shake Spears! Amelia seems to have S-worded with the best of them.

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but where is the 'Tartarian history' part of this?
 
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Qmeta

Qmeta

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I suppose, even after hundreds of years, she still can't get the credit she deserves. It must be someone else! :D
Post automatically merged:

I suppose, even after hundreds of years, she still can't get the credit she deserves. It must be someone else! :D
A woman talking about a man...

In the old age black was not counted fair,
Or if it were, it bore not beauty's name;
But now is black beauty's successive heir,
And beauty slandered with a bastard shame


Bastard = male

She is talking about herself. Now that she is beautiful, she has another problem. (That he is an illegitimate son)

She is the 'dark lady'
Post automatically merged:

thanks,
but where is the 'Tartarian history' part of this?
We have Tartarians on one side, and the anti-Tartarians on the other side.

' Throughout the 16th century, Jews gradually moved from the south of Italy to the north, with conditions worsening for Jews in Rome after 1556 and Venice in the 1580s. '

There's so much that these movements of people around Europe can tell us, I think.
 
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tupperaware

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This idea gets an F at Snopes. However its very interesting she was a closet/crypto Jewish woman.

"Lastly, the claim that Amelia Bassano wrote all of William Shakespeare’s plays is a decidedly fringe notion, even within the world of Shakespearean authorship controversies. While she is listed as a potential candidate by the Shakespearean Authorship Trust (a group seemingly determined to credit Shakespeare’s work to anyone but Shakespeare himself), even among that group she is included as just one of 66 candidates identified so far: "

Read more at:

FACT CHECK: Amelia Bassano: The True Shakespeare?

There apparently is a book related to this topic... The Lives of Girls and Women from the Islamic World in Early Modern British ...
 

tupperaware

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Snopes?

HAHAHAHAHAHAAAAA.....

funny :D

You're joking, right?

Its a joke I agree but their "research" prior to their opinion is sometimes useful. I beg forgiveness as I crave laughter and I shall quote the bard (KD!) forever after.
 
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Mifletz

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Debate still rages whether the character Shylock promoted antisemitism e.g. with his demand for a "pound of flesh", or actually subverted it e.g.. with his famous "Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?" speech.

Shakespeare (1564-1616) is second only to the Bible in popularity: "He was not of an age, but for all time" (Ben Jonson).

No other writer, in English or any other language, has rivaled the appeal, artistic endeavor and deep cultural influence of his plays such as Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Richard II, Richard III, A Comedy of Errors, All's Well that Ends Well, The Taming of the Shrew, Love's Labor's Lost, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Othello, Coriolanus, Titus Andronicus, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest etc. etc.

The depth of his characters, the insight into his personalities, the poetic sensitivity, artistic genius, historical accuracy, and prolific output was so extraordinary, that some claim today that they could not possibly all be the work of one man writing alone with a feather quill on the banks of the River Avon!

Common cliches like "one fell swoop", "not a mouse stirring", "to the manner born", "more honored in the breach than the observance" etc. are all straight from Shakespeare, and his cadences and vocabulary permeate the English we speak.

The Marranos living in England may have had some influence on Shakespeare; see "Kabbalistic Influences in Shakespeare" in "L'Eylah - Journal of the Office of the British Chief Rabbi" issue 39
pacino.jpg
 
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Bear Claw

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hey Qmeta, thats some pretty serious hearsay you got there! anything verifiable with it? Im more inclined to accept the hearsay that Francis Bacon most often used the pen name " William Shakespeare" but I cant confirm or deny there was more or less than one rose in that garden.



my decoder ring came up with "Will (where there is a will, there is a way)

WILL I AM

Shakes Spear,

ever notice while youre writing something how the pen seems to shake? or have you read before somewhere that 'the pen is mightier than the sword'

(S-word). perhaps of a PenDragon? a pen drag on paper, maybe?

also "shaking spears" (@ ignorance) is a fighting gesture, no?

but its always good to add more hearsay to the fires of endless hearsays I imagine. lol
I am always inclined toward the notion that Shakespeare - or the group known as Shakespeare - wrote the King James Bible, or at least Psalm 46.

No source, other than:

The King James bible was published in 1611. In 1611, Shakespeare was 46 years old.

The 46th word of Psalm 46 is Shake. The 46th word from the end of Psalm 46 is spear - disclaimer, I did try counting myself and was a word or so out. Possibly I was using a slightly different version of the bible...
 

whitewave

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That's some out-of-the-box dot connecting. :)
I doubt the bible was written by Shakespeare; not even the 46th Psalm. I'm an avid reader and can detect styles of writing between authors easily. When Frank Herbert died before finishing Chapter House, the final book in his Dune series, I could immediately detect the very sentence where he had left off and his son had picked up the writing.
First time I read Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden, it was immediately apparent that they were not ancient writings at all but more modern writings trying to sound ancient. It's impossible to mask individual style or to match it precisely to the style of someone else.
 

Bear Claw

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That's some out-of-the-box dot connecting. :)
I doubt the bible was written by Shakespeare; not even the 46th Psalm. I'm an avid reader and can detect styles of writing between authors easily. When Frank Herbert died before finishing Chapter House, the final book in his Dune series, I could immediately detect the very sentence where he had left off and his son had picked up the writing.
First time I read Lost Books of the Bible and the Forgotten Books of Eden, it was immediately apparent that they were not ancient writings at all but more modern writings trying to sound ancient. It's impossible to mask individual style or to match it precisely to the style of someone else.
Yeah, it is, and I am inclined to agree with you. I suspect often I let my enjoyment of a good numerological link get in the way of rational thought. Although, I don't think it is beyond the realms of possibility that s/he translated it.

And to be honest I think any King James Version would have been focused on translating / editing rather than actual writing.

I do SOMETIMES SUSPECT (as other people on here do) that reality is scripted and played out (I think this may be the most rational (although not necessarily truest) basis for 'prophecy', and people are actors, either consciously or unconsciously. Some people, like the people on here, notice the plot flaws. Others don't.

If you look around, most people, don't have any significant control over their lives. People that are successful and look to have made a 'difference' are often facilitated in their success. People that start to question things seriously become a little detached from "reality".

I don't believe, but do accept the possibility that the Bible is the closest thing we have to a script. As such it is perhaps tempting to link the "greatest playwright" (no idea why this is not playwrite??) of all time to the greatest play of all time Especially considering the timing. However I think I do fundamentally agree with you ;) I'm just entertaining possibilities.

Here is a quote that says as much (from the only sci-fi book I can honestly say I loved more than Dune!)

"Worse yet, I am at the moment very conscious of a squirrel-in Central Park, just off Sixty-eighth Street, in New York City-that is leaping from one tree to another, and I think that happens on the night of April 23 (or is it the morning of April 24?), but fitting the squirrel together with Fernando Poo is, for the present, beyond my powers. I beg your tolerance. There is nothing I can do to make things any easier for any of us, and you will have to accept being addressed by a disembodied voice just as I accept the compulsion to speak out even though I am painfully aware that I am talking to an invisible, perhaps nonexistent, audience. Wise men have regarded the earth as a tragedy, a farce, even an illusionist's trick; but all, if they are truly wise and not merely intellectual rapists, recognize that it is certainly some kind of stage in which we all play roles, most of us being very poorly coached and totally unrehearsed before the curtain rises. Is it too much if I ask, tentatively, that we agree to look upon it as a circus, a touring carnival wandering about the sun for a record season of four billion years and producing new monsters and miracles, hoaxes and bloody mishaps, wonders and blunders, but never quite entertaining the customers well enough to prevent them from leaving, one by one, and returning to their homes for a long and bored winter's sleep under the dust?"

Robert Anton Wilson / Robert O'Shea, Illuminatus Trilogy, the Eye in the Pyramid
 

Recognition

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Debate still rages whether the character Shylock promoted antisemitism e.g. with his demand for a "pound of flesh", or actually subverted it e.g.. with his famous "Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?" speech.

Shakespeare (1564-1616) is second only to the Bible in popularity: "He was not of an age, but for all time" (Ben Jonson).

No other writer, in English or any other language, has rivaled the appeal, artistic endeavor and deep cultural influence of his plays such as Henry IV, Henry V, Henry VI, Richard II, Richard III, A Comedy of Errors, All's Well that Ends Well, The Taming of the Shrew, Love's Labor's Lost, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Othello, Coriolanus, Titus Andronicus, King Lear, Macbeth, The Tempest etc. etc.

The depth of his characters, the insight into his personalities, the poetic sensitivity, artistic genius, historical accuracy, and prolific output was so extraordinary, that some claim today that they could not possibly all be the work of one man writing alone with a feather quill on the banks of the River Avon!

Common cliches like "one fell swoop", "not a mouse stirring", "to the manner born", "more honored in the breach than the observance" etc. are all straight from Shakespeare, and his cadences and vocabulary permeate the English we speak.

The Marranos living in England may have had some influence on Shakespeare; see "Kabbalistic Influences in Shakespeare" in "L'Eylah - Journal of the Office of the British Chief Rabbi" issue 39View attachment 23257
I def think the merchant of venice was written to subvert old ideas about jews, that probably had an amazing ending that was cut. If you read it, it's building to a moving, dramatic crescendo, that is abruptly cutoff and parsed with an almost 'f you' shallow and comical ending. After reading it, i was convinced that shakespeare had personal experience of that kind of discrimination, and had been told to change the ending of a moving piece of drama to something less caustic to the christians of the day, and so threw in an ending that was utter garbage. The tone of the ending compared to the rest of the play are completely at odds.

I found this article to be very thoughtful/makes convincing points:

Shakespeare's Plays Were Written By A Jewish Woman - Jewcy
 

Obertryn

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I don't really put much stock in this theory, it smells a bit too much like modernist revision, which is to say, a whole lot of conjecture and little fact. I'm especially not convinced by the assumption that because Shakespeare's plays display a familiarity with Judaism, that they must have been written by a Jew. Perusing Jewish religious texts and traditions as ammunition to demonstrate how much, in the author's opinion, the Jews sucked, wasn't exactly unheard of.

"Her most famous play, Romeo and Juliet, was a story about her relationship with someone she loved and had to leave when she was a young teenager. She was Juliet (a Jew) and he was Romeo (a non-Jew who lived in Rome)."

Considering that the story of Romeo & Juliet is based off actual historical figures and existed in at least 3 similar forms before Shakespeare, I heavily doubt this.
 

whitewave

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I don't believe, but do accept the possibility that the Bible is the closest thing we have to a script. As such it is perhaps tempting to link the "greatest playwright" (no idea why this is not playwrite??) of all time to the greatest play of all time Especially considering the timing. However I think I do fundamentally agree with you ;) I'm just entertaining possibilities.
I always appreciate out-of-the-box thinking; opens our minds to new possibilities. I don't require others to agree with me; I was just stating why I didn't ascribe to the idea of Shakespeare being the author of the 46th Psalm. :)

Interesting Wilson passage. Don't think I've read that one. If life is a script then the play is badly written. If we're all actors in life's drama, I wonder if our souls chose our parts before we were born or if they were assigned? Who is entertained by this comedy of errors? Whoever Shakespeare was, I'm sure he/she would be rewriting almost every scene.

btw, Definition of Wright:
wright
(rīt)
n.
One that constructs or repairs something. Often used in combination: a playwright; a shipwright.
 

Recognition

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I def think the merchant of venice was written to subvert old ideas about jews, that probably had an amazing ending that was cut. If you read it, it's building to a moving, dramatic crescendo, that is abruptly cutoff and parsed with an almost 'f you' shallow and comical ending. After reading it, i was convinced that shakespeare had personal experience of that kind of discrimination, and had been told to change the ending of a moving piece of drama to something less caustic to the christians of the day, and so threw in an ending that was utter garbage. The tone of the ending compared to the rest of the play are completely at odds.

I found this article to be very thoughtful/makes convincing points:

Shakespeare's Plays Were Written By A Jewish Woman - Jewcy


Obertryn, I get what you're saying about romeo and juliet, but what do you think about this quote? '2. Spoken Hebrew Although in late sixteenth century England about 30 scholars were studying written Hebrew, none of them actually spoke Hebrew. Spoken Hebrew was used only among European Jews, as a commercial language, to keep their information secure. How, then, was Mr. Shakespeare able to make the Hebrew puns or include examples of Hebrew transliteration identified by Israeli scholar Florence Amit? Or incorporate several quotations from The Talmud along with reference to Maimonides? Or integrate the examples of spoken Hebrew, seen, for instance, in All's Well That Ends Well?'

The fact that spoken language was used as a password of types make it far more likely that the author was of jewish descent, imo:) but i love hearing everyone's viewpoints, disagree or agree:)
 
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