Willamette Meteorite: why, and what is it?

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
3,407
Reactions
11,717
As normally, when one thing leads to another, I was looking at the images of various expositions and ran into an image related to the 1905 Lewis and Clarke Expo in Portland. Below, Ladies and Gentlemen is a meteorite, or so they say.

Willamette Meteorite
On display, Lewis and Clark Exposition, Portland, Oregon, 1905
17350

The Willamette Meteorite, officially named Willamette, is an iron-nickel meteorite found in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the largest meteorite found in North America and the sixth largest in the world.

Willamette Meteorite being moved
17355

  • There was no impact crater at the discovery site
  • The Willamette Meteorite was originally found in the Willamette Valley of Oregon near the modern city of West Linn.
  • Researchers believe the meteorite landed in what is now Canada or Montana
  • It was transported as a glacial erratic to the Willamette Valley during the Missoula Floods at
  • The transport happened at the end of the last Ice Age (~13,000 years ago)
  • It was long held sacred by indigenous peoples of the Willamette Valley
  • The indigenous peoples referred to this stone with the name Tomanowos (a Chinook word meaning "spiritual power")
  • The meteorite is on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, which acquired it in 1906
  • In 2005, the CTGRC sued to have the meteorite returned to their control but they were unsuccessful
Today
American Museum of Natural History
17358

Larger Image

Meteorite Characteristics
  • The Willamette Meteorite weighs about 32,000 pounds (15,000 kg).
  • Its dimensions are: 10 feet (3 m) tall X 6.5 feet (2 m) wide X 4.25 feet (1.3 m) deep
  • It is composed of
17360

Most iron meteorites like Willamette have originated from the differentiated core of planetesimals or asteroids that collided with another object. Willamette has a recrystallized structure with only traces of a medium Widmanstätten pattern; it is the result of a significant impact-heating event on the parent body. The Willamette Meteorite contains higher concentrations of various metals that are quite rare in Earth's crust. For example, iridium, one of the least abundant elements in Earth's crust, is found in the Willamette Meteorite at a concentration of 4.7 ppm, thousands of times more concentrated than in the crust.

Unobtainium
where is it?
The word unobtainium derives humorously from unobtainable with the suffix -ium, the conventional designation for a chemical element. In fiction, engineering, and thought experiments, unobtainium is any fictional, extremely rare, costly, or impossible material, or (less commonly) device needed to fulfill a given design for a given application. The properties of any particular unobtainium depend on the intended use. For example, a pulley made of unobtainium might be massless and frictionless; however, if used in a nuclear rocket, unobtainium might be light, strong at high temperatures, and resistant to radiation damage. The concept of unobtainium is often applied flippantly or humorously.

17359

KD: We have Iron, Nickel, Cobalt, Phosphorus, Iridium but... WHERE IS UNOBTANIUM. Every single so-called meteorite found on Earth contained only the elements presented in the Mendeleev's Periodic Table. Are we supposed to believe that out of those thousands of meteorites...
  • To date, there have been nearly 1,100 recovered falls (meteorites seen to fall) and nearly 40,000 finds (found, but not seen to fall). It is estimated that probably 500 meteorites reach the surface of the Earth each year, but less than 10 are recovered.
Out of all of them, not a single one contained an element not mentioned in the Periodic table? I do not know what they recover when they see one fall, just like I do not know if they recover anything at all, but... where is UNOBTANIUM? Are we supposed to believe that the group of elements we have here on Earth, is all there is out there (if there were such things as other planets and space)?

In my opinion, there is not enough evidence out there to say that these chunks of solidified molten iron (rock, etc) came from space. How else can contemporary scientists explain a 15 ton chunk of metal located in the middle of the woods? Sure they won't say this:
Naturally, and conveniently, for no real explanation would be required, and no uncomfortable questions would be asked... it fell from the sky.

Well, this is just my (super crazy sounding) opinion on the issue pertaining to Willamette Meteorite, as well as all the other "natural" things to ever fall from above.

Sources:
 

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reactions
405
What happed to it from 1905 onwards, was it subject to a massive polish and buffing, as the present meteor looks nothing like the one in the initial photo...

Im with you KD. These are more likely remnents of a prior civilization than heavy iron falling from the sky.

Sex them up as meteorites, keep the masses looking upwards and outwards instead of looking down and around.
 

Moriarty

Active member
Messages
72
Reactions
218
As normally, when one thing leads to another, I was looking at the images of various expositions and ran into an image related to the 1905 Lewis and Clarke Expo in Portland. Below, Ladies and Gentlemen is a meteorite, or so they say.

Willamette Meteorite
On display, Lewis and Clark Exposition, Portland, Oregon, 1905
View attachment 17350
The Willamette Meteorite, officially named Willamette, is an iron-nickel meteorite found in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the largest meteorite found in North America and the sixth largest in the world.

Willamette Meteorite being moved
View attachment 17355

  • There was no impact crater at the discovery site
  • The Willamette Meteorite was originally found in the Willamette Valley of Oregon near the modern city of West Linn.
  • Researchers believe the meteorite landed in what is now Canada or Montana
  • It was transported as a glacial erratic to the Willamette Valley during the Missoula Floods at
  • The transport happened at the end of the last Ice Age (~13,000 years ago)
  • It was long held sacred by indigenous peoples of the Willamette Valley
  • The indigenous peoples referred to this stone with the name Tomanowos (a Chinook word meaning "spiritual power")
  • The meteorite is on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, which acquired it in 1906
  • In 2005, the CTGRC sued to have the meteorite returned to their control but they were unsuccessful
Today
American Museum of Natural History
View attachment 17358

Larger Image

Meteorite Characteristics

  • The Willamette Meteorite weighs about 32,000 pounds (15,000 kg).
  • Its dimensions are: 10 feet (3 m) tall X 6.5 feet (2 m) wide X 4.25 feet (1.3 m) deep
  • It is composed of

Most iron meteorites like Willamette have originated from the differentiated core of planetesimals or asteroids that collided with another object. Willamette has a recrystallized structure with only traces of a medium Widmanstätten pattern; it is the result of a significant impact-heating event on the parent body. The Willamette Meteorite contains higher concentrations of various metals that are quite rare in Earth's crust. For example, iridium, one of the least abundant elements in Earth's crust, is found in the Willamette Meteorite at a concentration of 4.7 ppm, thousands of times more concentrated than in the crust.

Unobtainium
where is it?
The word unobtainium derives humorously from unobtainable with the suffix -ium, the conventional designation for a chemical element. In fiction, engineering, and thought experiments, unobtainium is any fictional, extremely rare, costly, or impossible material, or (less commonly) device needed to fulfill a given design for a given application. The properties of any particular unobtainium depend on the intended use. For example, a pulley made of unobtainium might be massless and frictionless; however, if used in a nuclear rocket, unobtainium might be light, strong at high temperatures, and resistant to radiation damage. The concept of unobtainium is often applied flippantly or humorously.

KD: We have Iron, Nickel, Cobalt, Phosphorus, Iridium but... WHERE IS UNOBTANIUM. Every single so-called meteorite found on Earth contained only the elements presented in the Mendeleev's Periodic Table. Are we supposed to believe that out of those thousands of meteorites...
  • To date, there have been nearly 1,100 recovered falls (meteorites seen to fall) and nearly 40,000 finds (found, but not seen to fall). It is estimated that probably 500 meteorites reach the surface of the Earth each year, but less than 10 are recovered.
Out of all of them, not a single one contained an element not mentioned in the Periodic table? I do not know what they recover when they see one fall, just like I do not know if they recover anything at all, but... where is UNOBTANIUM? Are we supposed to believe that the group of elements we have here on Earth, is all there is out there (if there were such things as other planets and space)?

In my opinion, there is not enough evidence out there to say that these chunks of solidified molten iron (rock, etc) came from space. How else can contemporary scientists explain a 15 ton chunk of metal located in the middle of the woods? Sure they won't say this:
Naturally, and conveniently, for no real explanation would be required, and no uncomfortable questions would be asked... it fell from the sky.

Well, this is just my (super crazy sounding) opinion on the issue pertaining to Willamette Meteorite, as well as all the other "natural" things to ever fall from above.

Sources:
Its the firmament
 

ScottFreeman

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reactions
311
As normally, when one thing leads to another, I was looking at the images of various expositions and ran into an image related to the 1905 Lewis and Clarke Expo in Portland. Below, Ladies and Gentlemen is a meteorite, or so they say.

Willamette Meteorite
On display, Lewis and Clark Exposition, Portland, Oregon, 1905
View attachment 17350
The Willamette Meteorite, officially named Willamette, is an iron-nickel meteorite found in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the largest meteorite found in North America and the sixth largest in the world.

Willamette Meteorite being moved
View attachment 17355

  • There was no impact crater at the discovery site
  • The Willamette Meteorite was originally found in the Willamette Valley of Oregon near the modern city of West Linn.
  • Researchers believe the meteorite landed in what is now Canada or Montana
  • It was transported as a glacial erratic to the Willamette Valley during the Missoula Floods at
  • The transport happened at the end of the last Ice Age (~13,000 years ago)
  • It was long held sacred by indigenous peoples of the Willamette Valley
  • The indigenous peoples referred to this stone with the name Tomanowos (a Chinook word meaning "spiritual power")
  • The meteorite is on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, which acquired it in 1906
  • In 2005, the CTGRC sued to have the meteorite returned to their control but they were unsuccessful
Today
American Museum of Natural History
View attachment 17358

Larger Image

Meteorite Characteristics

  • The Willamette Meteorite weighs about 32,000 pounds (15,000 kg).
  • Its dimensions are: 10 feet (3 m) tall X 6.5 feet (2 m) wide X 4.25 feet (1.3 m) deep
  • It is composed of

Most iron meteorites like Willamette have originated from the differentiated core of planetesimals or asteroids that collided with another object. Willamette has a recrystallized structure with only traces of a medium Widmanstätten pattern; it is the result of a significant impact-heating event on the parent body. The Willamette Meteorite contains higher concentrations of various metals that are quite rare in Earth's crust. For example, iridium, one of the least abundant elements in Earth's crust, is found in the Willamette Meteorite at a concentration of 4.7 ppm, thousands of times more concentrated than in the crust.

Unobtainium
where is it?
The word unobtainium derives humorously from unobtainable with the suffix -ium, the conventional designation for a chemical element. In fiction, engineering, and thought experiments, unobtainium is any fictional, extremely rare, costly, or impossible material, or (less commonly) device needed to fulfill a given design for a given application. The properties of any particular unobtainium depend on the intended use. For example, a pulley made of unobtainium might be massless and frictionless; however, if used in a nuclear rocket, unobtainium might be light, strong at high temperatures, and resistant to radiation damage. The concept of unobtainium is often applied flippantly or humorously.

KD: We have Iron, Nickel, Cobalt, Phosphorus, Iridium but... WHERE IS UNOBTANIUM. Every single so-called meteorite found on Earth contained only the elements presented in the Mendeleev's Periodic Table. Are we supposed to believe that out of those thousands of meteorites...
  • To date, there have been nearly 1,100 recovered falls (meteorites seen to fall) and nearly 40,000 finds (found, but not seen to fall). It is estimated that probably 500 meteorites reach the surface of the Earth each year, but less than 10 are recovered.
Out of all of them, not a single one contained an element not mentioned in the Periodic table? I do not know what they recover when they see one fall, just like I do not know if they recover anything at all, but... where is UNOBTANIUM? Are we supposed to believe that the group of elements we have here on Earth, is all there is out there (if there were such things as other planets and space)?

In my opinion, there is not enough evidence out there to say that these chunks of solidified molten iron (rock, etc) came from space. How else can contemporary scientists explain a 15 ton chunk of metal located in the middle of the woods? Sure they won't say this:
Naturally, and conveniently, for no real explanation would be required, and no uncomfortable questions would be asked... it fell from the sky.

Well, this is just my (super crazy sounding) opinion on the issue pertaining to Willamette Meteorite, as well as all the other "natural" things to ever fall from above.

Sources:
Earlier version of this? These Air Force 'rods from god' could hit with the force of a nuclear weapon

Oh, that reminds me...wouldn't that thing be a big ball of rust falling apart everywhere or is this more of that super-iron/steel recipe we seem to have "lost"...

17392

Or 100 year old ship "Kommuna" is still in service
 
Last edited:
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
3,407
Reactions
11,717
I’m just wondering at this point, how they conceived this idea of presenting otherwise unexplainable things like this W-chunk of iron, as something which came from space.

What is their actual substantiation of such claims?
 

ScottFreeman

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reactions
311
I’m just wondering at this point, how they conceived this idea of presenting otherwise unexplainable things like this W-chunk of iron, as something which came from space.

What is their actual substantiation of such claims?
Probably that it was found in a hole.

random humans: Hey, where did that come from?
PTB: Wasn't us!
random humans: The gods must hate us!
PTB: <evil laugh>

Oh, that reminds me...wouldn't that thing be a big ball of rust falling apart everywhere or is this more of that super-iron/steel recipe we seem to have "lost"...

View attachment 17392

Or 100 year old ship "Kommuna" is still in service
I’m just wondering at this point, how they conceived this idea of presenting otherwise explainable things like this W-chunk of iron, as something which came from space.

What is their actual substantiation of such claims?
And, I should have given a more serious answer as opposed to one partly in jest. Space is the ultimate unknown. Nothing 'out there' can ever be completely proven or disproved until we actually go ourselves. Anything "from space" is by definition "take our word for it".
 
Last edited:

BrokenAgate

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
685
The 1905 photo is most definitely not the same meteorite in the modern day photo. Surely this American Museum of Natural History gets asked about this all time... right?
No, because people will believe any old thing they are told, especially if a scientist says it. Not even the evidence in front of their own eyes will convince them that a scientist could be lying, or even just mistaken.
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,119
Reactions
3,314
The Museum of Natural History are the gatekeepers of all anomalous finds. They are a Smithsonian run museum and that's who dictates what gets displayed and what gets locked in the basement/warehouse. They also get to decide what narrative goes with what artifact. If an artifact surfaces for which no believable approved narrative can be concocted (giants bones, etc.) then away it goes to the basement (or bottom of the Atlantic ocean).
 

ScottFreeman

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reactions
311
Photo - Willamette Meteorite Is this supposed to be the meteorite, too? It looks nothing like the display piece, not even the same color. I don't understand what is going on here. These have to be two different rocks.
I still think almost all of the old "black and white" photos have been washed or their contrast blown out to remove much detail. After initially thinking the same, that they were different objects, I think now I may have been incorrect. It appears to be an elongated pyramid shape. Perhaps the photos are of 2 of the 3 longer flatter sides. I can't call it a fake until I see all sides and compare with the two we get to look at, which is actually a pretty good allegorical(?) statement of why I'm here. Funny, that.
 

BrokenAgate

Well-known member
Messages
223
Reactions
685
I was trying to do that, too, look for images showing the other sides. Kinda hard to do on my Kindle. If anyone here lives near this thing, maybe they could take some proper photos.
 

ScottFreeman

Well-known member
Messages
103
Reactions
311
Photo - Willamette Meteorite Is this supposed to be the meteorite, too?

View attachment 17483
Larger Image

It looks nothing like the display piece, not even the same color. I don't understand what is going on here. These have to be two different rocks. Hmmmm, it's a "marker replica," whatever that means. A replica is supposed to look like the actual thing, no?
Yea, that one looks COMPLETELY different to my eyes. Not like the original three pictures.
 

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
133
Reactions
405
Came across this other Meteorite just now:

World’s Largest Meteorite


17811

Another fairy story...

'The Hoba meteorite impact is thought to have occurred more recently than 80,000 years ago'

'The Hoba meteorite left no preserved crater and its discovery was a chance event'

😅😅😅


Name: Hoba “This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name”
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: No
Year found: 1920
Country: Namibia
Mass: 60 tons


Fairy Story
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,119
Reactions
3,314
A 60-ton rock drops out of the sky and hits the ground leaving no crater? Nothing short of miraculous.
 
Top