Will the real Pontius Pilate please stand up, and show us your toga?

KorbenDallas

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Below is an example of how our narrative compliant movies form erroneous perceptions and false understanding of our past. In this case we are talking about Pontius Pilate, what he looked like and what clothes he wore.

passionofthechrist-pilate.jpg

This is not a debate of whether he existed or not. Encyclopedia Britannica clearly tells us that he did:
  • Pontius Pilate, Latin in full Marcus Pontius Pilatus, (died after 36 CE), Roman prefect (governor) of Judaea (26–36 CE) under the emperor Tiberius who presided at the trial of Jesus and gave the order for his crucifixion.
  • Pontius Pilate | Biography, Facts, & Death
  • KD: As you can see, it does not say allegedly, or possibly so we have to accept that Mr. Pilate did exist, right?
When you search for Pontius Pilate in Google, you immediately end up with the below image to represent the notorious gentleman. The following bust possesses all "ancient Roman" characteristics we are used to, and generally expect to see. Yet:
  • I miserably failed to figure out where this bust of Pontius Pilate had come from.
  • I can't even figure out where it is located.
  • I found nothing on this bust.
I probably did not search good enough, but I gave it an honest try. So, I'm asking for your help:
  • Where and when was the below bust of Pontius Pilate discovered?
  • How was this bust identified to be representative of Pontius Pilate?
Pontius Pilate
Pontius-Pilate.jpg

Pontius Pilate, known for adjudicating on the trial and crucifixion of Jesus, was the fifth prefect of the Roman province of Judaea, serving under Emperor Tiberius from AD 26/27 to 36/37.
  • This can be confirmed from a block of limestone, the Pilate Stone, was found in 1961 at the Roman theatre at Caesarea Maritima, the capital of the province of Iudaea.
  • It is likely that Pontius Pilate made his base at Caesarea Maritima - the site where the stone was discovered, since that city had replaced Jerusalem as the administrative capital and military headquarters of the province in AD 6, Pilate probably traveled to Jerusalem, the central city of the province's Jewish population, only when necessary.
  • History says little about Pilate before he served as the Roman prefect of Judea between 26 and 36 A.D. It is thought he was born into an equestrian family in Italy, but some legends claim Scotland was the land of his birth.
  • There are ruins of a Roman house in the small village of Bisenti, a region of Central Italy, which is alleged to be the birthplace of Pontius Pilate.
  • Pilate was recalled to Rome in early 37 CE, charged with misgoverning, but Emperor Tiberius died before a trial. Pilate then disappears from the historical record.
Bronze Statue of Pilate
While trying to figure out the above bust origins, I ran into this little piece of information published on August 13, 1983 by The Lethbridge Herald Newspaper.
pontius_pilate-explosion.jpg

Needless to say, but I also failed to find a photograph of this destroyed bronze statue. I simply wanted to know who made it and when. France sure does like to burn, and blow up their historical landmarks.

Pontius Pilate
As far as I understand, our Pontius Pilate acquired his known traditional distinctive "ancient Roman" appearance some time in the 19th century. Well, may be late 18th. This is when depictions like the ones below started to come out.

  • Pontius Pilate, Roman politician, prefect of Judea 26 - 36 AD, half-length, woodcut by Michael Wolgemut or Wilhelm Pleydenwurff to the chronicle of Hartmann Schedel, Nuremberg, 1493​
pontius_Nuremberg.jpg

Jesus before Pontius Pilate.jpg

  • 1491: Christ before Pilate. Creator: Anonymous, possibly Wilhelm Pleydenwurff
christ_pilate.jpg

  • Cristoforo de Predis (1440-1486). Italian miniaturist. Miniature depicting Pilate Questions Jesus. In Stories of Saint Joachim, Saint Anne, Virgin Mary, Jesus, the Baptist and the End of the World, 1476, written by Galeazzo Maria Sforza (1444-1476). Royal Library. Turin, Italy.
Pilate Questions Jesus.jpg

Albrecht_Dürer_-_Christ_before_Pilate.jpg

Christ on Trial by Pilate. Greece, 16th C. Mt. Athos. Dionysiou Monastery..jpg

pilate_2.jpg

  • Christ before Pilate (The Liesborn Altarpiece), c. 1520. Artist: Baegert, Jan (ca 1465-ca 1535)
pilate_3.jpg

  • Christ before Pilate (Vlad III as Pontius Pilate), ca 1463-1464. Artist: Master of Velenje Panels (active 1450-1465)
Vlad III as Pontius Pilate.jpg

  • Christ before Pilate. The Wings of the Wurzach Altar, 1437. Artist: Multscher, Hans (c. 1400-1467)
Christ before Pilate.jpg

  • Jollain Passion Jesus Pontius Pilate Engraving Paris 17th Century
Jollain Passion Jesus Pontius Pilate Engraving Paris 17th Century.jpg

kd_separator.jpg

KD: Once again, it appears that fake "antiquity" is being forced into the World History narrative. It looks like our Pontius Pilate (if he ever existed) was considered to be some sort of a medieval historical figure. This, in turn, pushes all the accompanying events into the time frame which shatters the official historical version.

What's you opinion on this? When did Pontius Pilate put his toga on for the first time?
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Fomenko; New Chronology v.3 posits indeed the 12th century AND not in ME Jerusalem, but Constantinople.
Well, we have this from some Mitchell Potter:
  • Matthew breaks new ground, however, when he claims that the native Jews of Europe were conspiring to assist their exilic brethren, the Tartars, to overthrow their Christian masters. The Jewish-Tartar Plot entry of 1241, already discussed in regard to the TTP in Chapter 1, provides a confession from the Jewish elders that confirmed the biblical ancestry of the Tartars.
  • Page 58 of the PDF
Thank you @jd755, that was a cool looking monument. Judging by its appearance, it was probably made some time in the 19th century.

Unrelated to the monument. On some of the OP images, Mr. Pilate appears to be wearing a Tartarian looking attire.

Additionally it's rather interesting how in 1879 they were managing to discover some real old non-existent documents and publish a book based on those non-existent docs.

acta_pilati.jpg

  • The Acta Pilati: important testimony of Pontius Pilate, recently discovered, being his official report to the Emperor Tiberius, concerning the crucifixion of Christ
They just had to stick this "tartars" in there, whatever it could mean.

tartar_jesus.jpg
 

jd755

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Text from the second linked page translate by google.

Missing statues

Lourdes - Pontius Pilate

The Stations of the Cross of Espelugues in Lourdes has 15 stations, representing 115 characters. The first station, with Pontius Pilate sitting at the top of the stairs, dates from 1899. It was the subject of an attack on Friday, August 12, 1983.


An explosion seriously damaged this first station. The character of Pontius Pilate was destroyed.

The context was that of Pope John Paul II's coming to Lourdes three days later on August 15th.

The other damaged statues have been restored, but Pontius Pilate has not been replaced. The number of characters of the Stations of the Cross is now 114.

The character of Jesus was moved in front of the she-wolf, but one of the projects of the sanctuaries of Lourdes is to resettle Pontius Pilate one day in its place.

The steps of this first station (Scala Sancta) must be mounted on their knees by the pilgrims.

Pontius Pilate's head was preserved and could be seen in the old "Treasury Museum".

Pontius Pilate (born in Lyon around 10 BC) was prefect of the Roman province of Judea at the time of the crucifixion of Jesus. He really existed (died around 39). According to the Gospels, Jesus is led before Pilate by Jewish religious leaders to judge and condemn him. Pontius Pilate sees no reason for condemnation, but before the movement of the crowd, takes water and washes his hands, then condemns him by saying, "I am innocent of the blood of this just; you, you will notice. Note finally that the role of Pontius Pilate was taken to the cinema in 1962 (by Jean Marais).

Here is what we read in the local newspaper "La Dépêche du Midi":

The group Curators-stop

"The attack took place around 3 am on Friday, August 12, 1983. Bronze fragments of several kilograms from the statue of Pontius Pilate are found more than 100 meters from the site of the explosion. The action is claimed by a group called Curts-Arrest and says, by his act, want to "protest against the arrival of the CEO of the Vatican multinational visiting SARL Soubirou." On Saturday, August 13, a young man and two young women from the anarchist movement are arrested in Toulouse. The police discovered in their homes craft materials similar to those used the day before in Lourdes. Immediately indicted for destruction by explosive threatening the safety of the people and imprisoned, they are released three weeks later and then sentenced to prison sentences combining firm and reprieve.
 

CyborgNinja

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It is believed the Scottish kilt in Scotland originates from the 16th century. Back then, it was named the Feileadh Mor, rather than a kilt. It basically existed as an extended length of fabric, which was quite thick and was worn over the shoulder of the person, as well as being worn around the waist.
Why did this Feileadh Mor come about? Well, it is thought it was worn to protect the wearer from the harsh climate. For around 300 years, it wasn’t considered a symbolic garment of clothing for a Scottish person to wear

So essentially the kilt was a thicker, hardier version of a toga. Eventually morphing into just the waist down skirt.
 

Worsaae

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" Feileadh Mor "

In danish which is very much like scottish we have these words that resemble Feileadh:
Fælde: trap or cut down a tree (related to the english verb to fall/falling)
Fældning: falling - could be like wrapped around / falling onto something
Fælle: Fellow (friend / ally)
Fælled: shared area belonging to a village/community
Fælles: adjective "shared by a group"
 

CyborgNinja

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" Feileadh Mor "

In danish which is very much like scottish we have these words that resemble Feileadh:
Fælde: trap or cut down a tree (related to the english verb to fall/falling)
Fældning: falling - could be like wrapped around / falling onto something
Fælle: Fellow (friend / ally)
Fælled: shared area belonging to a village/community
Fælles: adjective "shared by a group"
Thanks. I was gonna Google the word but was like "Nah, can't be bothered. I'm sure if the universe wants me to know the meaning then it'll happen organically." You know the thread is good when the info starts snow balling like this.

I like the definition "Fældning: falling - could be like wrapped around / falling onto something."
An English translation might be "To drape. As in how cloth is draped over something in this case a person."
 

codis

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I vividly remember history and art lessons in school.
The fact that medieval art, especially painings, showed supposed ancient Greek or Roman events in a medieval setting (clothing, buildings) did not go without notice. The teacher's excuse was that medieval artists either preferred it, or the rich customer ordered it that way.
Circular reasoning, again.
Another interesting fact I picked up - artists tend to give depicted figures the features of (more or less) famous people of their environment. Often, the customer itself is shown as the protagonist.
Pretty sure this applies to the bust in the first post.
 

ripvanwillie

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Well, we have this from some Mitchell Potter:
  • Matthew breaks new ground, however, when he claims that the native Jews of Europe were conspiring to assist their exilic brethren, the Tartars, to overthrow their Christian masters. The Jewish-Tartar Plot entry of 1241, already discussed in regard to the TTP in Chapter 1, provides a confession from the Jewish elders that confirmed the biblical ancestry of the Tartars.
  • Page 58 of the PDF
Thank you @jd755, that was a cool looking monument. Judging by its appearance, it was probably made some time in the 19th century.

Unrelated to the monument. On some of the OP images, Mr. Pilate appears to be wearing a Tartarian looking attire.

Additionally it's rather interesting how in 1879 they were managing to discover some real old non-existent documents and publish a book based on those non-existent docs.


  • The Acta Pilati: important testimony of Pontius Pilate, recently discovered, being his official report to the Emperor Tiberius, concerning the crucifixion of Christ
They just had to stick this "tartars" in there, whatever it could mean.

This book reads like a 19th century novel, which it clearly is. The writing style, grammar and language are all 18th century. One thing of note, apparently jesus was a believer in the flat or hollow earth based on this quote on pp 56-57:

Capture 1.JPG

Capture 2.JPG
 
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