White Sands National Monument: who covered 143,733 acres with gypsum?

KorbenDallas

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White Sands National Monument is a United States national monument located in the state of New Mexico. The monument comprises the southern part of a 275 sq mi (710 km2) field of white sand dunes composed of gypsum crystals. The gypsum dune field is the largest of its kind on Earth.
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It is interesting, that when you zoom in, Google Maps appears to be hiding something in the southwestern part of the formation. If I was to guess, there could be some outlines they do not want us to see. The place is properly protected by every single agency guaranteeing that no digging will ever take place.

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History
The first Euro-American exploration was led by a party of US Army officers in 1849. The idea of creating a national park to protect the white sands formation dates to 1898 when a group from El Paso, Texas, proposed the creation of Mescalero National Park.
  • The plan failed as it included a game hunting preserve that conflicted with the idea of preservation held by the Department of the Interior.
  • In 1921–22, Albert B. Fall, Secretary of the Interior and owner of a large ranch in Three Rivers northeast of the dune field, promoted the idea of an "all-year national park" that, unlike more northerly parks, would be open even in the winter. This idea ran into a number of difficulties and did not succeed.
  • Tom Charles, an Alamogordo insurance agent and civic booster, was influenced by Fall's ideas. By emphasizing the economic benefits, Charles was able to mobilize enough support to have the national monument created.
  • On January 18, 1933, President Herbert Hoover designated White Sands National Monument, acting under the authority of the Antiquities Act of 1906. The dedication and grand opening was on April 29, 1934.
Geology
Long ago, an ancient sea covered most of the southwestern United States. It was during this time that layers of gypsum were deposited on the seafloor. The rise and fall of the sea level millions of years ago started the process of making the gypsum sand that covers the monument today. Many factors, including the latest ice age, had an effect on the formation of this magnificent landscape. The following journey through time shows the gradual transformation from sea to sand, and the amazing factors that allow this dune-field to exist.
Rebecca Burghart, program manager of visitor services of White Sands, said the gypsum remained at the bottom of the lake because it at times was created more quickly than it could be dissolved.
The "Monument"
We have this pile of gypsum sand in the middle of "nowhere" New Mexico. The pile of gypsum is considered to be super important, and somehow can be considered a monument.

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KD: Courtesy of TPTB, I think this is one of those "in our face" lies. First of all, regular scientists do not have a slightest idea of where this weird "sand" came from. In their act of cowardice, they hide behind their usual "millions of years ago" fairy tale.

Those who do know where the gypsum came from, are the same ones who dig-protected the site. In other words we are talking about TPTB here.

In my opinion, a huge pile of this white junk was dumped in the area at about the same time we acquired the Grand Canyon. Whether we are dealing with some quarrying spoils being randomly dumped in the area, I am not sure. At the same time, judging by how protective of the area TPTB is, it most likely was not a random act.

And how many Military Bases do we have down there? Those in power have everything covered, LOL.

No matter where you look from, this National Monument smells. Today, and back in the day the preferred method of obtaining gypsum was/is quarrying. They could simply shovel it here, but they chose not to.

As a basis for this hypothesis I will say the following:
  • All this gypsum sand was dumped here on purpose in order to bury some objects. So they literally covered something up.
    • Makes you wonder how this "cover-up" term got originated, right?
 

Apollyon

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“The aim is to protect all historic and prehistoric sites on United States federal lands and to prohibit excavation or destruction of these antiquities.”
Pretty blatant if you ask me. Why are people so apposed to excavation? Why does it have more value underground where no one can see it?
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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And what may I ask is the ancient significance of this in the middle of the ocean ? Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument - Wikipedia
Ok, could we please avoid derailing the thread. Start a new one for something not directly related to this pile of dumped gypsum.

By the way, I think Google Earth timeline revealed one of the things they could be hiding in the vicinity of our National Monument. What do you think those lines could be?
  • I doubt this is the only thing they do not want us to see in this specific area.
  • Could there be an older city there underneath?
white_sands_lines.jpg

As far as the current map goes, we get this blurry shadowed area.

white_sands_shadow.jpg
 

Feralimal

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It has some odd 'markers', for sure and it would be interesting to investigate.

On a practical level the thing looks immense. How could anyone move that much material? Maybe they ground it up to create it in situ? If so, it would be interesting to look at the sand close up to see if there are any tells..

Also, you'd think that a big storm would be capable of blowing bits of sand away, and that over time this mound would disperse over the nearby terrain (and expose whatever is underneath). Do they have some sort of clean up crew to 'preserve' the 'monument' that go around brushing it back into place after a windy day?
 

Feralimal

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Absolutely - experience can be a limit to what we can conceive of. I wasn't closing the topic down though - to move, extract or in some other way to create that amount of material is a worthwhile question.

Maybe this was a thing that was controlled, using technology as you say elsewhere. Maybe it is a natural weather phenomenon - we sometimes have sand raining down further away. I myself have experienced sand covering cars and houses (it was a very light covering) in the UK. We were told this was sand picked up in a storm from the Sahara desert.
 

Huaqero

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Look at this grid on the south and the polygon around it ...

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And the grid around it is even more visible on Bing maps...
(Bing maps is so much better than Google on contrast and details, on most of the occasions...)

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WTF?

(and what is that 'Space Harbor' in there? LOL)

(And, btw, what is that black spill on the north of White Sands?)

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Recognition

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I'm no scientist, but is this study saying gypsum is impervious to magnetism? (Won't let me link the study-abstract below.)

The Effects of Magnetic Fields on the Nucleation and Growth of Gypsum Crystals
Karadeniz Technical University Chemical Engineering Department Trabzon Turkey
Aqueous supersaturated solutions of Calcium Sulphate Dihydrate (Gypsum) have been magnetically treated by passing the former at high velocities through fields of permanent magnets and also using the “Polar Water Conditioner”. No effects have been observed on either the nucleation or the growth process, at least up to magnetic field intensities of 16 KOe and solution velocities of about 170 cm/sec. Possible reasons have been given for this behaviour and for observations of other authors who have claimed positive results.
  • Given the edging KD and Huaquero show, it looks to me like maybe they covered up a starfort; perhaps its imperviousness to magnetism is desirable because other minerals might ultimately organize themselves to reveal what is underneath?
 

0harris0

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what is that 'Space Harbor' in there? LOL
i like how it's part of the "White Sands Missile Range"... a missile range in a protected national monument... what?!
what is that black spill on the north of White Sands?
looks like miles and miles of black rocks, not even bedrock, just loose stone!

so we have a giant unexplainable white sand dunes just a couple of miles from a giant area of pretty much nothing but black rocks littering the ground!!
 

EmmanuelZorg

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(And, btw, what is that black spill on the north of White Sands?)

I have seen black rocks similar to those in SW Utah. I was told it was an old lava flow by a local resident, although there was no way for me to verify that. I did get out of the car and look at some of it, and it did look like black pumice. This image looks like what I saw in Utah.
 

Banta

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Seems to show more mastery of manipulating rock and as usual, the scale seems incredible. We've forgotten much.

Wiki on gypsum:

The word gypsum is derived from the Greek word γύψος (gypsos), "plaster".[4] Because the quarries of the Montmartre district of Paris have long furnished burnt gypsum (calcined gypsum) used for various purposes, this dehydrated gypsum became known as plaster of Paris. Upon addition of water, after a few tens of minutes plaster of Paris becomes regular gypsum (dihydrate) again, causing the material to harden or "set" in ways that are useful for casting and construction.

Gypsum was known in Old English as spærstān, "spear stone", referring to its crystalline projections. (Thus, the word spar in mineralogy is by way of comparison to gypsum, referring to any non-ore mineral or crystal that forms in spearlike projections). In the mid-18th century, the German clergyman and agriculturalist Johann Friderich Mayer investigated and publicized gypsum's use as a fertilizer.[5] Gypsum may act as a source of sulfur for plant growth, and in the early 19th century, it was regarded as an almost miraculous fertilizer. American farmers were so anxious to acquire it that a lively smuggling trade with Nova Scotia evolved, resulting in the so-called "Plaster War" of 1820.[6] In the 19th century, it was also known as lime sulfate or sulfate of lime.
 

Huaqero

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I have seen black rocks similar to those in SW Utah. I was told it was an old lava flow by a local resident, although there was no way for me to verify that. I did get out of the car and look at some of it, and it did look like black pumice. This image looks like what I saw in Utah.
My first thought was that this is a natural oil spill (ok, who knows what is 'natural' anymore?...) that moistened the ground there and solidified, there are these oil fields around, aren't they?
 

Starmonkey

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We have the Great Sand Dunes in CO here, and they can't explain it either.
Closest composition to glass.
Giant ant people.
 

Spigy855

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I've been to White Sands. The sand is coarser than what you find on a typical beach. It was cool to the touch and didn't stick to you. You can only drive in to a small part of the dunes in the south. You can get a backpacking permit to hike in and stay over night. I don't remember seeing anything unusual like long straight lines. There is a spot on the north side where they set off the first nuclear bomb, the trinity site. They only let you visit it once a year on the anniversary.

I was going to mention the Great Sand Dune in CO also. There are the Coral Pink sand dunes in southern Utah, in Christmas Valley OR, Bruneau Dunes in ID south-east of Boise, Sand Lake OR by Tillamook and the dunes by Florence OR.
 

0harris0

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I was going to mention the Great Sand Dune in CO also. There are the Coral Pink sand dunes in southern Utah, in Christmas Valley OR, Bruneau Dunes in ID south-east of Boise, Sand Lake OR by Tillamook and the dunes by Florence OR.
lots of sand! would be interesting to see where the large dunes in the US are all located in comparison with one another, and the geography.. somethng to look at this afternoon :D
 

Casimir

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Recently there was a lot of hubub about White Sands because of the Sunspot Observatory Closure in NM. Observatory was cleared out a few days, FBI was on the scene etc. Official story is a janitor was downloading child porn on a laptop in the network. The go-to narrative explanation for "You'll never get the actual reason out of us." Of course none of the actions of LE and their refusal to provide local authorities with any information at all support the official narrative. One of the theories I saw floated around was the Observatory was mighty close to White Sands- perhaps they are related in some way, like bad agents from another country were setup and monitoring White Sands or something. If that were the case, it would make sense to not let the gen pop know about the mystery under the sand, or of the sand and go with child porn instead

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