When was the first tower crane with operator cabin invented?

KorbenDallas

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Help me out here please, if you can. I'm trying to figure out when the below type of crane was officially invented, and used. My findings do not match the official version. I am probably looking in the wrong places, so I need some assistance figuring this out

The photograph pertains to 1894-1897.

crane_derrick_1894-1897_1.png
Source: American Hoist and Derrick Co., St. Paul, Minn - I'd save this PDF before it disappears. There is a whole bunch of stuff in the catalogue.
In general it appears we have something weird going on with these tower cranes. The official date of the invention of this type of crane is listed as 1910-1913. May be the crane above is not considered to be a tower crane, I don't know. It sure does look like one.

Dates is what I'm trying to figure out.

lifting crane.png

Some sources:
From humble beginnings as an iron foundry in 1854, the pioneers at WOLFFKRAN introduced the first tower crane ever in 1913.
 

humanoidlord

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it looks big enough to be a tower crane and it looks surprisingly modern too
 

ISeenItFirst

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It looks beyond modern. A modern boom is much larger, usually a triangle truss shape. That looks like a solid boom. Either it couldn't lift much or there is some fancy material in use. Could be wrong, can't zoom too close.

And holy crap those top lines must go way out into a field. There is no ballast on these, they just use the cable, tied to the other crane and the cables that run to the ground. So they have a boom that isn't flexing with that large crate hanging, and cables that aren't stretching. Not to mention that narrow main shaft.

Interesting picture for sure.

The second one, well nothing crazy there.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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The second one from 1911 was presented for contrast as compared to 1897.

1897’s capacity is stated as 3 tons.
 

ISeenItFirst

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Still tough to do any kind of engineering on it without making a lot of assumptions. 3 tons not very much for a crane, so would likely be inconclusive anyways.
Who knows how they rated it anyhow. At full boom that might be a lot, it has a long boom.

And I haven't become an engineer since my last post.
 

ISeenItFirst

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underachiever.
LOL

I could probably pass myself off as one better than most laypersons, and probably a couple degreed individuals as well, but won't do that here. The pay isn't good enough.

Wish I was better at history. I'm more of a right now and how do it work kinda guy.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Interesting info in there. What makes you think 265 tons pertains to 1897? Though even for 1911 it sounds interesting.

Fun fact. Tower of Babel by Bruegel in 1563. A double treadwheel crane.

79E627A2-52F4-4FCD-B6D9-AAA922134B9C.jpeg
 

whitewave

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If your question is directed to me, I did look to see if there earlier mentions of the 1897 crane (but didn't look for very long). There is an International Encyclopedia that was published in 1906 that might contain such info. When I posted it was late and I had to get up in about 4 hours. Sorry.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Nah, I was just wondering in general. These early 20th and late 19th century equipment things, popping up left and right become very interesting.
 

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