What's up with Victorian staircases?

BrokenAgate

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This video discusses the dangers of Victorian-era staircases, particularly the steep, narrow staircases that led to the servants' quarters, which were generally on the upper floors. The main staircase, the one visitors would see when they came into the house, would be wide and grandly designed, with plenty of space for the feet, often costing thousands of pounds; while those for the servants were haphazardly designed, tall, steep, narrow, with unevenly spaced risers and often lacking handrails. The servants' health and safety didn't matter, since they were easily replaceable and nobody cares about poor people.

The thing I'm wondering is this: were the grand, beautiful, and safe staircases installed by the Victorians at all? They seem similar to the style we are calling Tartarian, although it could be a style of some other empire/kingdom/territory existing simultaneously, we don't really know. So let's just say, the Old Earth style, wherein everything was made to be not merely functional, but beautiful, as well, and it was simply a matter of course to embellish everything with cupids, gold leaf, and frou-frou scrolly bits. I'm thinking that the terrible, no-good, very bad servants' staircases, crammed into tiny spaces for the sake of convenience and saving money, came after the mud flood and restoration era. The narrator is just lumping everything into the same time frame because that's all he knows based on the history he's been taught.

I did a bit of looking about and came across an entire blog dedicated to the dangers of Victorian homes. It must have sucked to live in those times. That link goes to the first of a 4-part series on staircases. I just can't imagine trying to get up and down such stairs while wearing voluminous skirts and carrying a child or linens or trays of food. Could these really have been designed by the same people who made this?

staircase.jpg

We've seen the photos of Tartarian buildings with the bigger entrances and windows on the bottom floors and smaller windows at the top, and speculated that perhaps there were different sized levels for different sized people. There could also have been a division of rich and poor, masters and servants, with the servants living in the smaller quarters on the top floor. Perhaps it was both; big people in charge, smaller people serving them.

st-peterburg-9.jpg

This is St. Petersburg, where you can clearly see the smaller and larger windows. I cannot imagine this building having steep, rickety, dangerous staircases anywhere. If the smaller floors were for the servants (and assuming this was originally a place for people to live in), then they didn't have to suffer the constant fear of dying on a staircase.

I dunno, I watched the video and some things just don't seem to add up. I think we are seeing two different construction styles--one breathtakingly beautiful, the other cheap, dirty, and hazardous--from two different periods of human history that were separated probably by a short period of time...however long it took to clean up the muddy mess and begin moving cheap, expendable labor into the cities.
 

asatiger1966

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This video discusses the dangers of Victorian-era staircases, particularly the steep, narrow staircases that led to the servants' quarters, which were generally on the upper floors. The main staircase, the one visitors would see when they came into the house, would be wide and grandly designed, with plenty of space for the feet, often costing thousands of pounds; while those for the servants were haphazardly designed, tall, steep, narrow, with unevenly spaced risers and often lacking handrails. The servants' health and safety didn't matter, since they were easily replaceable and nobody cares about poor people.

The thing I'm wondering is this: were the grand, beautiful, and safe staircases installed by the Victorians at all? They seem similar to the style we are calling Tartarian, although it could be a style of some other empire/kingdom/territory existing simultaneously, we don't really know. So let's just say, the Old Earth style, wherein everything was made to be not merely functional, but beautiful, as well, and it was simply a matter of course to embellish everything with cupids, gold leaf, and frou-frou scrolly bits. I'm thinking that the terrible, no-good, very bad servants' staircases, crammed into tiny spaces for the sake of convenience and saving money, came after the mud flood and restoration era. The narrator is just lumping everything into the same time frame because that's all he knows based on the history he's been taught.

I did a bit of looking about and came across an entire blog dedicated to the dangers of Victorian homes. It must have sucked to live in those times. That link goes to the first of a 4-part series on staircases. I just can't imagine trying to get up and down such stairs while wearing voluminous skirts and carrying a child or linens or trays of food. Could these really have been designed by the same people who made this?


We've seen the photos of Tartarian buildings with the bigger entrances and windows on the bottom floors and smaller windows at the top, and speculated that perhaps there were different sized levels for different sized people. There could also have been a division of rich and poor, masters and servants, with the servants living in the smaller quarters on the top floor. Perhaps it was both; big people in charge, smaller people serving them.


This is St. Petersburg, where you can clearly see the smaller and larger windows. I cannot imagine this building having steep, rickety, dangerous staircases anywhere. If the smaller floors were for the servants (and assuming this was originally a place for people to live in), then they didn't have to suffer the constant fear of dying on a staircase.

I dunno, I watched the video and some things just don't seem to add up. I think we are seeing two different construction styles--one breathtakingly beautiful, the other cheap, dirty, and hazardous--from two different periods of human history that were separated probably by a short period of time...however long it took to clean up the muddy mess and begin moving cheap, expendable labor into the cities.
That was a great observation , Thank you
 

jd755

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Interesting. I've been up and down both types of staircases in a fair few 'stately homes and other buildings' over here which predate Victoria's reign, or so we are told, and some which are Victorian in age and to be honest other than the width of the ornate stairs being much more airy and open above, so to take in the 'meet the ancestors' paintings on the walls there is no difference in safety.
Now going up and down well worn stone spiral staircases in castles and lighthouses is another experience entirely.
Not sure what the above has to do with your two stage construction supposition but I have to say both types do seem to me to be part of the same construction, even in the ruined and part ruined ones.
 

Starmonkey

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I've experienced as well. Hard to tell about buildings except individually.
And, like the mud flooders, copying happened (basement windows became a thing AFTER the fact).
We watched Netflix Hill House show before I knew about any of this. And my wife grew up in NC and lived in Ashville where the Biltmore is...
I'd be curious to tear some of those old staircases out and see if there are others beneath, or you can see a different "foot print" on the wall...
Otherwise, I don't think danger and discomfort were intentional. Sometimes it was because they lived on upper floors above family or guests and had to cover more vertical distances with less space. Yes. Keep them tucked away in the back where nobody has to see them coming and going about their business like happy little house elves.

Plus, who knows how old some of those houses really are. Because they took such good care of stuff. Polishing, dusting, sweeping over and over...
And I'm noticing a difference in style or function of architecture. The houses like this one and the gothic "churches" have similar attributes and design. The buildings and some other dwellings used for politics or business of state are more the "Greco-Roman" or neo-classical. So, different time periods? Or just different functions?
Same with the whole beginning of this business via our tireless media.
When I first saw Sylvie's stuff on YouTube, the buildings she was showing looked like the designs of Vikings or stuff you'd find in the Alps, not Rome. Same sort of flair and detail as gothic. More curves and intricate absurdities. Like in that video of the building with the energy halo on top.
So there's at least two distinct styles in these old buildings were finding...

Also thinking the giants faded away over some time. Plagues or whatever was used to initially decimate their numbers, then like the few pictures we've seen in the 1800s. Just a handful left. But, if you had an old house or wanted to host them, you'd have to have the space.
I think later peeps got help with some building projects or still had a handle on techniques we no longer know. Hell, EL did it with his Coral Castle...
Some of the state and office and fair buildings had different sized doors specifically suited to the visitors. Ancient Egypt and Mayans also. Or stairs that were the same. Bigger ones for bigger people, alongside those for the little folk like us. Or littler. People used to be even shorter before we got this admixture of giant stock.

Maybe there used to not be the kind of SLAVERY attention to detail and jumping around. Still would've been servants. That's an OLD tradition, but maybe they just made meals and did laundry, but had dumb waiter elevators and laundry chutes and the class distinction wasn't so hideously absurd.
Could use the regular front staircase at certain hours...
Also used to have their own quarters not in the main house. When the days work was done, they went back to their own homes.
I think maybe those back staircases, lodging in the house, etc came with the reset. Amped up the slaves to royals division. More demands, less respect and appreciation. The creation of a false currency to widen the gap even further... And still the inability of that false monetary system to EVER give them any recompense or hope of a better life. Centered on themselves and their families instead of catering to others'.
Can't WAIT for the death of money and taxes. And the end of TIME. And DEATH...
;)
 
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WarningGuy

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I watched that vid last weekend. It does bring some interesting tidbits to light.
My staircase has a 12” rise. I don’t bother to go up there anymore.
Wow i don't think ive ever seen a 12" rise. I know here in Australia its a max of 180mm (7") in the old days here it was 8" or 9" but 12" that would not be easy to get up and down.
 

SuperTrouper

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These are the outdoor steps in Saint Petersburg. Some consider them to be made for normal, and abnormal individuals.
Those larger steps could just be there for people to be able to sit down and have lunch, coffee, chat or a smoke. I see them all the time here in Australia, next to small (normal) steps, near very recently constructed buildings.
 

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