What is the real history of Modern Sports?

Timeshifter

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Couldn't find a suitable forum KD, please move if needs be.

This will be a quick post, I am busy at work so doing this on the fly.

Thinking lately about sport, and how it appears that all modern sports (ok, ball sports in particular) appear to have popped up right at the time of our considered reset (early – mid 1900s.)

I do not have any specific proof, this is just my wondering mind.

We have discussed at length here how we believe much or our tech has been re - discovered, not ‘invented’ what if is the same for sport?

The mainstream would have us believe that sport dates back to ‘ancient’ times with the ‘ancient’ Olympics etc. There are ‘beliefs’ such as the Panathenaic Stadium in Greece was built for and hosted the Ancient Olympics Games from 330bc until 300’s Ad. Apparently, rebuilt entirely in marble from 144 AD…..

What if, these stadia weren’t so ancient at all? But actually were in use for what we call modern sports as recently as just prior the latest reset?

If we trace the history of many, if not all ‘modern’ popular sports, they take us back to the 1800s, with ‘variation’ of them being around for hundreds of years in various guises. But generally speaking, these modern sports all come in to being in the 1800s.

Football (Soccer) 1863

‘Football, in the contemporary sense of the term, can be traced back no further than the mid-19th century, after it became, in 1863 to be precise, a game of clear structure’

Source

Baseball: 1846

‘Cartwright’s changes made the burgeoning pastime faster-paced and more challenging while clearly differentiating it from older games like cricket. In 1846, the Knickerbockers played the first official game of baseball against a team of cricket players, beginning a new, uniquely American tradition’

Source

Cricket: 1839. Although thought have been around since 1500s in some guise

‘The sport of cricket has a known history beginning in the late 16th century. Having originated in south-east England, it became the country's national sport in the 18th century and has developed globally in the 19th and 20th centuries’

‘All the modern county clubs, starting with Sussex in 1839, were founded during the 19th century’

Waki Source

Rugby: 1845

‘Rugby football started about 1845 at Rugby School in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, although forms of football in which the ball was carried and tossed date to medieval times’

Waki source

You see the pattern. I do realise we can argue the finer points of exact dates of origin, but you get the gist.
Within a short period of time, we all suddenly decide to formalise sports that have been around for centuries?

Why could this have been, surely it can’t be coincidental?

This got me further thinking, why have these sports developed stadia? Why do football, baseball, soccer, cricket etc all take place in a stadium? Obviously I understand the need for somewhere to house the crowd, but why the size and shape of these stadia?

We are told by the mainstream that Roman/ Greeks etc had the Colosseum, amphitheatres and the like ‘stadia’ for their gladiator battles etc:

‘It is thought that over 500,000 people lost their lives and over a million wild animals were killed throughout the duration of the Colosseum hosted people vs. beast games'

‘The Ancient Romans would sometimes flood the Colosseum and have miniature ship naval battles inside as a way of entertainment’

This sounds to me exactly how we use modern stadia, for all manner of events.

Ref

If we look at the Colosseum, it is the same layout as a modern sports stadium, and was easily large enough to house any modern sport.

colosseum_hero.jpg

The Colosseum, AD 80
Kappa-KTFC-WEMFAT-MC-13052000-001.jpg

The original Wembley Stadium, 1923​

What if, these stadium for actually simply used for sport? And post reset in the 1800's, when we normal folk began to recover, we simply picked up where we had left off, progressing with wooden stand style stadia, and using re discovered tech until we got the concrete stadium of the 1900's?

According to one mainstream source, the oldest ‘modern’ sports stadium in the world is the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Australia, 1854. This makes little sense to me, as if we are to believe the mainstream, Sydney was not established until 1788, with Melbourne following in 1835. And according to waki, British cricket did not appear in its modern guise until 1839…

Source

However, here is a suggestion the England had its own Cricket ground by 1814

‘Stadium construction moved from Italy and Greece to England, where Lord’s Cricket Ground in London started taking shape in 1787. By 1812, Lord’s had found a new location and started creating what is now likely the oldest in-use stadium in the world, with its first structure built in 1814. A grandstand 30 feet high and 175 feet long took shape in 1867, complete with a private box for the Prince of Wales’

Source

As usual, the history we are presented with has more plot holes than a Marvel movie.

So why stadia? Are we simply copying what came before, or is it more than that? Were the original stadia designed simply to seat spectators, or for something else? Members of this forum are not strangers to conversations about sound and energy. My own personal experience of Sports Stadia is the atmosphere. As a lifelong supported of Liverpool Football Club, and being present when the now 54,000 strong crown sing in unison, the vibe and the energy that is generated from the crowd, in my mind at least is key to the design of the closed in stadium, perhaps originally not so much to inspire the team, but to generate whatever ‘vibe’ is required, through audio. If the game is not going well, you can sense the low, when it is going well, you can sense the high. It is wholly mesmerising.

In summary:

So what do we have?

Main stream history claims that all modern sports sprang up into their almost present day form, after being around in various guises for x amount of years, in the 1800's along with the idea to build Colosseum style stadia to house the crowd. Although as ever, there are no ‘concrete’ facts pertaining to the actual invention, creation, start dates for any of these sports, simply a whole bunch of possible dates. These are less than 200 years ago, yet we know the exact dates of stadia built 2000 years ago and the games played in them?

My own personal belief is that these modern sports have been around much longer, and what we have is a continuation of sports played prior to an 1800's reset.

I would love to hear the forums thoughts on this.

Cheers.
 
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Timeshifter

Timeshifter

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Great topic and congrats on winning the UCL.

Just a couple of days ago, I was wondering where there is any truth to this page: Calcio Fiorentino - Wikipedia. Is it true that Calcio Fiorentino was a precursor to modern day football/soccer and rugby?

I believe so, played in stadiums just the same! What is the date in the bottom right corner? J or i 6000? 6sss?

And thanks, yeh, we had to win something this season!

Calcio_fiorentino_1688.jpg
 

anotherlayer

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I became a master at Takraw (sepak takraw, dtagra, etc). One night, I was invited by a Thai friend to come to this Cambodian workforce camp around the corner and watch the locals play "their game". I was immediately addicted (having been an old deadhead who just loved some hackysack) and soon enough, I was the #1 falang (foreigner)!

I eventually spotted and photographed this mural (mentioned on wiki) at Wat Phra Kaeo in Bangkok:

3369938509_78c1d45efa_z.jpg

This sport became my life. Every night before dinner all the guys would meet up and we'd drink until our wives yelled at us. Notice how sloppy they get as the sun goes down. Lao Kao is way too cheap to drink.


I don't have much to add other than just my celebration for this sport. But, I do wonder why the mural depicts monkeys playing this sport. This mural is given the year of 1785.

Murals at Bangkok's Wat Phra Kaeo which was built in 1785, depict the Hindu god Hanuman playing sepak takraw in a ring with a troop of monkeys. The game was played in its circle form for hundreds of years, and the modern version of sepak takraw began taking shape in Thailand sometime during the early 1740s. In 1929 the Siam Sports Association drafted the first rules for takraw competition.[11]
I still have no idea which one is supposed to be the Hindu god Hanuman. But, I did have a mural artist paint me up a scene that I specifically requested these monkeys be put in. This artist had a yellow soi dog that looked very close to my yellow dog, we enjoyed that. So, I asked him to put my dog in the painting and somewhere lost in transation, he drew his dog in. Lol. Always a story...

IMG_20120216_203529.jpg

Southeast Asia is a total mystery prior to the 1700s. I think it was underwater until this time, but that is a completely different rabbit hole.

3438062021_151be5b60e_z.jpg
 
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SuperTrouper

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To add information about other/similar ball sports. GAA sports certainly have clear origins way before the 19th century.

While Gaelic football as it is known today dates back to the late 19th century (of course, LOL), various kinds of football were played in Ireland before this time. The first legal reference to football in Ireland was in 1308, when John McCrocan, a spectator at a football game at Novum Castrum de Leuan (the New Castle of the Lyons or Newcastle) was charged with accidentally stabbing a player named William Bernard. A field near Newcastle, South Dublin, is still known as the football field. The Statute of Galway of 1527 allowed the playing of "foot balle" and archery but banned "'hokie'—the hurling of a little ball with sticks or staves" as well as other sports.

Hurling is older than the recorded history of Ireland. It is thought to predate Christianity, having come to Ireland with the Celts. It has been a distinct Irish pastime for at least 2000 years. The earliest written references to the sport in Brehon law date from the fifth century. The 13th century Statute of Kilkenny forbids hurling due to excessive violence, stating further that the English settlers of the Pale would be better served to practice archery and fencing in order to repel the attacks of the Gaelic Clans. 1527: Statute recorded in Galway City: "At no time to use ne occupy ye hurling of ye litill balle with the hookie sticks or staves, nor use no hand balle to play without the walls, but only the great foot balle."

Basque pelota (pilota in the original Basque language also pelota vasca in Spanish, pelote basque in French) is the name for a variety of court sports played with a ball using one's hand, a racket, a wooden bat or a basket, against a wall or, more traditionally, with two teams face to face separated by a line on the ground or a net. The roots of this class of games can be traced to the Greek and other ancient cultures. The origin of this sport is tied to the decline of the ancient jeu de paume (jeu de paume au gant), ca. 1700. While the game evolved to the modern jeu de paume (with racquet, called real tennis in England) and eventually to tennis, rural Alpine and Pyrenean communities kept the tradition. At the 1900 Summer Olympics, a Basque pelota tournament was contested.

There is evidence of Australian rules football being played sporadically in the Australian colonies in the first half of the 19th century. Compared to cricket, football was viewed as a minor "amusement" at the time, and while little is known about these early one-off games, it is clear they share no causal link with Australian football. On 10 July 1858, the Melbourne-based Bell's Life in Victoria and Sporting Chronicle published a letter by Tom Wills, captain of the Victoria cricket team, calling for the formation of a "foot-ball club" with a "code of laws" to keep cricketers fit during winter.

To relate to an earlier post, Waki mentions that Calcio Fiorentino (also known as calcio storico "historic football"), which originated in 16th-century Italy, may have started as a revival of the Roman sport of harpastum. This game was apparently a romanised version of a Greek game called phaininda, or of another Greek game called episkyros.
 
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Timeshifter

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So the questions remains, what was so special about the 19th century which allowed working class people begin to put these sports together on a professional level? Sports that had their origins going back suposed 'centuries'...
 

HulkSmash

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The Mayan played a ball game in courts where teams tried to get the ball through a vertical 'hoop' on the side walls. Many of the ancient sites have these ball courts and it was a great honor to play. If I remember correctly, supposedly you could not use your hands to throw the ball throught the hoop, but had to kick it or hit it with your arms, legs, or hips to score. I seem to remember they wore pads of some sort for this because the ball was somewhat hard and heavy. I think it was a blend of basketball and soccer but the ball was smaller.
 

studytruth

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The Mayan played a ball game in courts where teams tried to get the ball through a vertical 'hoop' on the side walls. Many of the ancient sites have these ball courts and it was a great honor to play. If I remember correctly, supposedly you could not use your hands to throw the ball throught the hoop, but had to kick it or hit it with your arms, legs, or hips to score. I seem to remember they wore pads of some sort for this because the ball was somewhat hard and heavy. I think it was a blend of basketball and soccer but the ball was smaller.
Oh it was way more than that. You should read Peter Tomkins Secrets of the Mexican Pyramids (very hard book to find now). But the game also was able to layout the life of all the players (ie their good and bad deeds somehow set up thier starting points on the field) and at times their I dont want to say personality, but their life interactions would have an impact on the game (getting sort of bonus oportunities as the game went on). one of the most fascinating reads I had...but been about 15 years ago now I read it, so all I have is the general memory of what he presented.
 

KorbenDallas

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Currently in Victoria, BC. Visited (among other things) this Mayan Exposition at the local Royal BC Museum.

I will have a few things to say when I get back to Seattle, and while the Mayan ball game will only be a small part, it could still be interesting for some :)
 
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Timeshifter

Timeshifter

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Currently in Victoria, BC. Visited (among other things) this Mayan Exposition at the local Royal BC Museum.

I will have a few things to say when I get back to Seattle, and while the Mayan ball game will only be a small part, it could still be interesting for some :)
Will look forward to that :)
 

SuperTrouper

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Below is taken from here. It's quite an interesting analysis...

Sport & Televised Sport
Firstly I’m not saying sport is bad! Indeed it’s very beneficial to health and I recognise that entirely, but again it pays to step back and view it from a different perspective. A hundred or so years ago sports culture, the notion of adults playing competitive sports in arenas would have been greeted with laughter and derision. Playing was something that children did, whilst adults focused upon ... well adult things! Yes, before I’m shouted down I realise that is a simple analogy but without getting into the whole history of sport I’m going to leave it there. Although, I will just say that in ancient history the Olympics etc were very different from the team system we have today and much of what is now termed sport was associated with military prowess/combat. Team sports predominantly originated from the British Empire during the 19th century. It was at this time that the writer, futurist and indeed eugenicist H.G Wells began to envisage the sports arenas and sport culture of the future. The manufactured sports culture would again utilise a tribal system of allegiances. With this idea as a template as institutions gradually and insidiously began to take over all the masculine roles; sport was considered an outlet for an aggression that may have otherwise been channelled into matters of consequence. By manipulating the tribal basis of our heritage they slowly channelled the definition of masculinity away from the role of societal protector and into support of their team/tribe and indeed sports arena. Slowly greasing the skids to ease the male's gradual slide into disenfranchisement and allowing the social engineers an ever increasing free reign to construct the social order.
 

KorbenDallas

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The Mayan played a ball game in courts where teams tried to get the ball through a vertical 'hoop' on the side walls. Many of the ancient sites have these ball courts and it was a great honor to play. If I remember correctly, supposedly you could not use your hands to throw the ball throught the hoop, but had to kick it or hit it with your arms, legs, or hips to score. I seem to remember they wore pads of some sort for this because the ball was somewhat hard and heavy. I think it was a blend of basketball and soccer but the ball was smaller.
As promised:
 

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