What is hiding in Greenland?

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
477
Reactions
1,564
So old Donald is looking to buy Greenland from Denmark for 'Strategic' reasons'

Oh really?

'Greenland, and more specifically its purchase by the US, is being actively discussed in Donald Trump’s Oval Office. But what exactly is it that makes one of the world’s most desolate places such an attractive proposition?

For the president, it is the real estate deal of a lifetime, one that would secure a land mass a quarter the size of the US and cement his place in US history alongside President Andrew Johnson, who bought Alaska from Russia in 1867, and Thomas Jefferson, who secured Louisiana from the French in 1803'

So why now?

'Greenland harbours some of the largest deposits of rare-earth metals, including neodymium, praseodymium, dysprosium and terbium, along with uranium and the byproducts of zinc'

Source

Getting warmer?

Or could it be that its close to the Arctic?
Perhaps under its ice lies the remnents of something other than mineral deposits?

Map_of_Greenland_in_1791_by_Reilly_077.jpg


map-of-greenland.jpg


Whatever the real reason, my guess is that if it is strategic, its nothing to do with any mainstream narrative!

This Doc believes Greenland was once quite warm...

Mmmm

Also...

'The DNA is proof that sometime between 450,000 and 800,000 years ago, much of Greenland was especially green and covered in a boreal forest that was home to alder, spruce and pine trees, as well as insects such as butterflies and beetles'

Ridiculous dates again however.

Source

Love to hear your thoughts?
 
Last edited:
OP
Timeshifter

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
477
Reactions
1,564
No one had ever... dont you love statements like that :)

No one in this current timeline/ newsfeed/ text books...

Brain fart, that story could be part of the narrative to have us believe Greenland is an icy island?
 
Last edited:

Rhayader

Member
Messages
36
Reactions
80
Doesn't northern Canada and Greenland look like it's had a few impacts and the land mass has been broken up? I suspect there's a lot more up there than we are led to believe, but if there was huge damage there may be little human evidence left to trace.
 

Banta

Well-known member
Messages
69
Reactions
261
Exploring the cold recesses of our universe, NASA is naturally all over this.

Are the land-based ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica continuing to lose mass (ice)? – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

The argumented reality rocket fireworks and green screen educational clips aren't where their actual research takes place... If you accept that they even perform research.

Maybe Trump just wants to buy it so they have someplace to send people to Mars. Knock them out (it's a long trip!), plop them in a remote area of Greenland, and tell 'em you can't leave the terraformed zone. The Martian meets The Village.

Searching for Life on Mars through the Lens of Greenland

Edit: This one is fun too:

An international team of researchers, including a NASA glaciologist, has discovered a large meteorite impact crater hiding beneath more than a half-mile of ice in northwest Greenland. The crater — the first of any size found under the Greenland ice sheet — is one of the 25 largest impact craters on Earth, measuring roughly 1,000 feet deep and more than 19 miles in diameter, an area slightly larger than that inside Washington’s Capital Beltway....

...The crater formed less than 3 million years ago, according to the study, when an iron meteorite more than half a mile wide smashed into northwest Greenland. The resulting depression was subsequently covered by ice.

"The crater is exceptionally well-preserved and that is surprising because glacier ice is an incredibly efficient erosive agent that would have quickly removed traces of the impact," said Kurt Kjær, a professor at the Center for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and lead author of the study.
The date has to be correct though, I'm sure.

International team, NASA make unexpected discovery under Greenland ice – Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet

This is also quite interesting, not NASA, but US military:

Thule Site J - Wikipedia

Screenshot_20190819-180920~2.png

Citation needed!!

Edit edit: Greenland has a lot going on. The whole arctic does. This book raises a lot of questions:

Manual of the Natural History, Geology, and Physics of Greenland, and the Neighboring Regions

A lot in there but the parts on magnetic declination are very interesting. As are the discussions of atmospheric electricity. It also illustrates how difficult finding an objective direction the further north you go.

The entire Thule area needs more investigation:

In 1818, Sir John Ross's expedition made first contact with nomadic Inuktun in the area. James Saunders's expedition aboard HMS North Star was marooned in North Star Bay 1849–50 and named landmarks.[3] Robert Peary built a support station by a protected harbor at the foot of iconic Mount Dundas in 1892. It served as a base camp for his expeditions and attracted a permanent population. In 1910 explorer Knud Rasmussen established a missionary and trading post there. He called the site "Thule" after classical ultima Thule; the Inuit called it Umanaq ("heart-shaped"), and the site is commonly called "Dundas" today. The United States abandoned its territorial claims in the area in 1917 in connection with the purchase of the Virgin Islands. Denmark assumed control of the village in 1937.

A cluster of huts known as Pituffik ("the place the dogs are tied") stood on the wide plain where the base was built in 1951. (A main base street was named Pituffik Boulevard.) The affected locals moved to Thule. However, in 1953 the USAF planned to construct an air defense site near that village, and in order to limit contact with soldiers, the Danish government relocated "Old Thule" with about 130 inhabitants to a newly constructed, modern village 60 miles (97 km) north, known as Qaanaaq, or "New Thule".
Thule Air Base - Wikipedia

 
Last edited:

SuperTrouper

Well-known member
Messages
147
Reactions
429
Do we have any members from Greenland? That would be great!
I am highly doubtful given that Greenland's population stands at just over 55,000. Do we even have anyone who's visited? Anyone from Denmark?

I feel like there's so much hidden in the Arctic, that the TPTB are sweating by the thought of melting ice. That whole polar circle is a huge mystery, from Novaya Zemlya (Russia) pyramid, to Baffin Island (Canada), an island 1/4 the size of Greenland (with proportionate population of approximately 13,000), which contains some of the finest and purest iron ore deposits on the planet.
 
Last edited:

Banta

Well-known member
Messages
69
Reactions
261
I am highly doubtful given that Greenland's population stands at just over 55,000. Do we even have anyone who's visited?

I feel like there's so much hidden in the Arctic, that the TPTB are sweating by the thought of melting ice. That whole polar circle is a huge mystery, from Novaya Zemlya (Russia) pyramid, to Baffin Island (Canada), an island 1/4 the size of Greenland (with proportionate population of approximately 13,000), which contains some of the finest and purest iron ore deposits on the planet.
Or "they're" melting the ice on purpose...
 

Red Bird

Well-known member
Messages
514
Reactions
1,279
Yes I saw this earlier and not once did anyone bring up (lol)
Thule Society - Wikipedia

Or better yet
History of The Thule Society
Beliefs
A primary focus of Thule-Gesellschaft was a claim concerning the origins of the Aryan race. "Thule" was a land located by Greco-Roman geographers in the furthest north. The society was named after "Ultima Thule" — (Latin: most distant North) mentioned by the Roman poet Virgil in his epic poem Aeneid, which was the far northern segment of Thule and is generally understood to mean Scandinavia. Said by Nazi mystics to be the capital of ancient Hyperborea, they placed Ultima Thule in the extreme north near Greenland or Iceland.

The Thulists believed in the hollow earth theory. The Thule Society counted among its goals the desire to prove that the Aryan race came from a lost continent, perhaps Atlantis.

The Thule-Gesellschaft maintained close contacts with followers of Theosophy and the followers of Helena Blavatsky, a famous Occultist during the second part of the 19th century.

Anthroposophical themes were common too, as the motto Der Weg ist in Dir - 'The Way is present in You', expresses. Self-realization and the supreme position of the human person were essential to the Thulists.


Just mentioned Virgil’s Aeneid in the Faustian Pope thread where it seems clement came from. Dang. Everything is related.
 

Obertryn

Well-known member
Messages
152
Reactions
385
Shouldn't the US be discussing buying Greenland WITH the government of Greenland? Seeing as how they are semi-autonomous and for all intents and purposes, basically a separate country from Denmark. What if the US buys Greenland, Greenland goes "ha, ha, f**k you" and declares total autonomy? What is Trump going to do, send in the US Army to show those uppity Danish whose boss? That'd be a catastrophic PR crisis for the US. It's one thing when you go to bomb the crap out of Syria or Libya or Iraq, whom half of the Western world believes to be comprised of illiterate peasants ruled by Sauron in human form anyway, you can't do that to Greenland, which is a lot closer to home for most Europeans. Meanwhile Denmark walks away with billions of American dollars, laughing all the way to the bank.

I doubt this is being discussed in any serious way. More likely, Trump is fishing for permission from Denmark to conduct full-scale mining/construction operations there by US contractors without any legal obstruction. Considering US industry has been almost completely demolished and outsourced to Asia at this point, this might be an attempt to kick-start it again with some fresh territory that's ripe for the picking. As for why it's ripe for the picking - because as other posters have pointed out, global environmental changes are kicking in and the TPTB are going to take full advantage.

Business as usual, in other words.
 

AnthroposRex

Active member
Messages
112
Reactions
235
There may be increased activity to find currently frozen above ground spots that will be clear of ice after the next disaster.
Gotta start a new civilization somewhere.

I wouldn't be surprised if they plan to just heap leech most of Greenland for resources though.
 

SuperTrouper

Well-known member
Messages
147
Reactions
429
On this map, Greenland looks much smaller than what is presented in contemporary maps. It's barely 3-4x the size of Islant Thule (presumably current Iceland), whereas if we are to trust current sources, Greenland is approximately 21x larger than Iceland in area. Unless of course Greenland from this map is connected (at least by ice) to the northern lands...

EDIT: I watched a YouTube video recently about what would happen if all ice melted off Greenland, and it would not be a single landmass but a series of Islands, with sea in the middle. It resembles the above map to a point. Have a look here:

 
Last edited:

Rarity

Member
Messages
14
Reactions
78
There is a pretty weird and seemingly obscure history involving the United States and Greenland after just my cursory exploration of the history and prior knowledge of some events.

First up we have a US Navy officer named Robert Peary and his expeditions into Greenland in the late 1800s.
In 1886, US Navy civil engineer Robert Peary decided he wanted to cross Greenland solo via dog sled and was granted a 6-month leave from the Navy and $500 from his mother (around $14,000 equivalent today). A Danish official named Christian Maigaard ended up accompanying Peary, supposedly by convincing him that going by himself was suicide. They allegedly made it the 2nd farthest across the ice sheet, 100 miles east of Godhavn, before running low on food and turning back.

In 1896, Peary was ordered by the Navy to go down to Nicaragua to survey for a Nicarague Canal. Well, Peary needed a sun hat if he was going to Nicaragua and in the shop he struck up a conversation with a 21-year-old Matthew Henson who Peary discovered had 6-years experience as a cabin boy, Peary "immediately hired" him as his personal valet. Henson went with Peary to Nicaragua where Peary kept telling him about his Arctic exploration desires, and Henson became Peary's "first man" and accompanied him on all of Peary's expeditions.

In 1891, Peary made his 2nd Greenland expedition, this time wanting to travel north to see if Greenland extended to the North Pole. Evidently his first excursion won him fame as this expedition was financed "by several groups, including the American Geographic Society, the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences, and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences." He also brought a group with him, including Henson, Frederick A. Cook (acting as the group's surgeon), Elvind Astrup (a Norwegian skier and the expedition's ethnologist), Langdon Gibson (bird expert and marksman), John M. Verhoeff (weathman and mineralogist), and Peary's wife (who was the "dietitian" for the group, despite no formal training as such. Her inclusion attracted criticism of Peary in the press).

On the way towards Greenland in July 1891, Peary broke his leg when their boat's tiller violently struck him. They made a campsite in northern Greenland and spent 6 months there as he recovered. Peary had at some point studied the Inuit and adopted their survival techniques which would be used on the expeditions, such as building igloos instead of carrying tents and sleeping bags, and wearing furs. Inuits worked as dog handlers and hunters on his expeditions. He created the "Peary system" of using support teams for Arctic exploration and creating supply caches out in the wild. Starting in September, the other group members would push out no more than 30 miles from their camp to set up supply caches. Peary's leg had healed by February 1892. he and his wife traveled with an Inuit handler to nearby villages to buy supplies between February and April, and in May 1892 he finally set out on the expedition with Henson, Gibson, Cook, and Astrup. Around 150 miles into this journey, the others bailed and Peary and Astrup continuing on by themselves, eventually arriving at Navy Cliff overlooking Independence Fjord, which led them to conclude Greenland was an island. The two then headed back to their base camp, arriving on August 6th and having traveled a total of 1,250 miles.

His WIkipedia then notes that in 1896 he went through the Masonic degrees at a New York City lodge and presented the lodge with a Masonic flag that had been flown over Greenland's Independence Bay in 1895. I have no idea what this is about as trying to search "independence bay" just thinks you're typoing Independence Day, nor who raised the flag if Peary wasn't a Mason until the following year, and there doesn't seem to be any mention of him being there in 1895. The Independence area was found to have remnants of an ancient "Paleoeskimo" civilization with "elliptical floor plans" and rock and bone tools, supposedly going back as far as 2400 BC. They found more recent buildings and artifacts said to date from around 800 BC to 200 BC, and believe they were different cultures due to differences in the buildings.

Peary made several other expeditions between 1898 and 1909, exploring islands around Canada and Greenland and primarily focused on attaining the North Pole, though there is controversy still going over 100 years later over whether he actually made it there or was only close to it or if he intentionally lied about it. For some reason only the Henson article quotes the loadout he brought on his final expedition to get to the Pole: "22 Inuit men, 17 Inuit women, 10 children, 246 dogs, 70 tons (64 metric tons) of whale meat from Labrador, the meat and blubber of 50 walruses, hunting equipment, and tons of coal. In February, Henson and Peary departed their anchored ship at Ellesmere Island's Cape Sheridan, with the Inuit men and 130 dogs working to lay a trail and supplies along the route to the Pole"

Peary, a Lieutenant when all this was happening, was promoted to a Captain in 1910. In 1911 after Congress recognized that he had "attained" the Pole, he was retroactively promoted to rear admiral dating back to April 6th, 1909 (the day he set up camp within 5 miles of the Pole), and he immediately retired. He then became interested in aviation and in 1916 was the chairman for the National Aerial Coast Patrol Commission which advocated for the use of aircraft to patrol for warships and submarines. Peary's fame helped him promote naval aviation and led to the creation of the Naval Reserve aerial coastal patrol units during WWI and he proposed airmail routes which became the basis for the US airmail system.

So, from around 1896 to 1892 the United States may have laid claim to some parts of Greenland thanks to Peary. We then get to another weird incident. From at least 1867, the United States - or at least the Secretary of State, William Seward - wanted to gain control of the Virgin Islands, which were owned by Denmark at the time. These colonies there were not doing so well, and Seward successfully had a treaty where the US would gain control and citizens could choose to remain Danish or become US citizens. Unfortunately for Seward, he had supported Andrew Johnson during his impeachment, so the US Senate wisely decided they would destroy this deal just to spite Seward, because that makes sense.

They still wanted these islands, so another Secretary of State made another treaty in 1900 (without the citizenship grants of Seward's), which was approved by the 1902 Senate but not by the Danish parliament as it ended up deadlocked. We skip over a decade later, WW I is now raging and the US government uses that to strongarm Denmark into giving up those islands after they declined another purchase offer, because if Germany annexed Denmark, they might go down to those islands and set up shop with uboats, and that would not be good, so Denmark better do something or else the US will invade and take those islands by force just in case Denmark is annexed by Germany and so Germany doesn't set up uboats there.

Denmark finally agrees to sell after these threats and the continued moneysink of the colonies there, with the process starting in 1916 and being finalized in March 2017. The US paid $25,000,000 in gold and Denmark demanded that the United States make a declaration that they would "not object to the Danish Government extending their political and economic interests to the whole of Greenland" as part of the deal.

During WW II, Denmark fell to Germany and the US was afraid the Germans would then try to occupy Greenland, in violation of the US' Monroe Doctrine. After Denmark's occupation, the US began negotiating with Greenland to set up a consulate, and Canada did too. Believing occupied Denmark did not have sovereignty over Greenland, the Danish Minister to the United States went rogue and made a treaty with the US in 1941 that allowed them to take over the defense of Greenland and establish bases. This was without approval of the occupied Danish government, and they accused him of treason, fired him and demanded he return, he ignored them. The Germans were also angered and thought the Danish government knew about it and they wanted the Minister executed. This led to the creation of Thule Air Base in 1943. Thule Air Base - Wikipedia

Germany schemed on how to set up Arctic weather stations and the solution was to try to use an old Norwegian claim to parts of Greenland and go make them there. Greenland didn't like this and they were running dog sled patrols to help the American planes and boats patrol the land for any Germans. In March 1943. a two-man sled patrol saw smoke coming from an abandoned hut, as they approached two men ran into the hills, in the hut they found "half a polar bear" and German military uniforms. The patrolmen decided to set up camp near there because the dogs were tired, and an unknown number of Germans closed in on them, resulting in the men leaving behind their sleds and fleeing on foot back to their base, leaving behind not only their supplies but a journal full of intelligence on their operations. Greenland's governors authorized shooting or capturing Germans, but the dog sled patrolmen were not soldiers. This was solved by making them Greenlands first, and only, military unit. This small group of dog sledders prepared to defend their camp at Eskimonaes, and there were but 5 at the camp when the Germans came. They briefly parlayed, with the German naming several men there thanks to the captured journal presumably, and asked if the patrolmen would respond with force if they didn't comply with the request to approach unarmed, they said yes and the Germans opened fire. The patrolmen fled and the Germans sacked the camp and torched it, another captured journal ended up in the Gestapo archives somehow.

The other patrolmen ran into the Germans (I have no idea how many were there as this source doesn't seem to mention, at least 4) and they opened fire on one man's sled, mortally wounding him and killing many dogs. This man was the first and only Dane to die in Greenland during the war. Two more patrolmen surrendered after being shot at by Germans. One of them escaped by asking to go bury the slain man and the other remained with them, forced to be their guide. He worked against them, recommending they take a difficult route to an island they wanted to destroy a radio on, and when he got an opportunity he took off with a sled and the German lieutenant's rifle. He arrived at an island but the others had already left, rather than going to regroup with them ,he went back and took the German lieutenant as a prisoner of war, then spent 3 weeks traveling with the German on a dog sled.

There was one more battle between the patrolmen and the Germans in 1944, this resulted in the death of a German soldier. Between these battles, the Germans reportedly were playing a cat-and-mouse game of moving between camps and destroying things while US ships tried to keep their reinforcements from arriving.

There is also the "Lost Squadron" of aircraft that had to land on Greenland, losing their planes to the ice, some of which were later dug out and restored.

The sled patrols continued into the Cold War, looking out for Soviets. The treaty the US made with the Minister to build bases there continued past the war and led to yet another weird thing.

In the late 1950s, the US began construction of Camp Century, a Star Wars' Hoth Echo base-like research lab dug out into the ice, powered by a mobile nuclear reactor. "The base consisted of 21 tunnels with a total length of 9,800 feet (3.0 km)." https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Camp_Century_layout_plan.png "Coring deep into the ice allowed scientists to study thousands of years of climate history. They were also able to look back in time by observing germs preserved in water that melted off glaciers. People lived and worked there year-round—the underground camp included a chapel, a theater, and a hobby shop, all contained in interconnected tunnels sort of like an ant colony. All the electricity was supplied by the world’s first mobile nuclear reactor, which was assembled elsewhere then placed in the deep recesses of the snow."

Camp Century was supposedly used as a coverup for what they really wanted to do, Project Iceworm, where they desired to make hundreds of missile silos in the Greenlandic ice sheet so they could threaten strikes on the USSR. "The plan was to dig 2,500 miles of tunnels in which to store and maybe someday launch 600 nuclear missiles."

Camp Century and Project Iceworm were both allegedly cancelled and shut down after a few years because the ice was a "viscoelastic material" and as time passed the structures they had built in it were becoming warped or collapsed as the ice shifted. The one major research thing they seemed to have done there was to make deep ice cores going down to the ancient ice, analysis of the cores has purportedly showed that the climate is changing for the worse. They left 200,000 liters of diesel fuel, radioactive waste, and other things at Camp Century when they abandoned it to be consumed by the ice sheet. There are concerns that the camp's remains could be exposed if the climate warms and "could release the nuclear waste, 20,000 liters of chemical waste and 24 million liters of untreated sewage."

In 1968 a B-52 crashed in Greenland and it was armed with 4 hydrogen bombs. The bombs went off in the crash and created a predictably bad mess of contamination, the clean up removed over 550,000 US gallons of contaminated liquid. An investigation in the 1990s by Danish officials looking into this accident revealed the Project Iceworm plans and that their government had secretly approved the US' nuclear flights over Greenland, which became the "Thulegate" scandal as it was in contravention of Denmark's nuclear-free policies.


According to its lore, from its earliest colonization Greenland is synonymous with ice, hence supposedly naming it such to fool people into trying to settle there. The not-so secret and secret projects of Camp Century and Project Iceworm both heavily involved the ice and digging down into it. We have precedent for things being recovered from the icy depths in the story of the lost WW II airplanes. Whatever the actual motives for attempting to purchase it are, the "secrets lost under the ice" version pretty much writes itself here.
 

SuperTrouper

Well-known member
Messages
147
Reactions
429
These "Sled Patrols" sound so far fetched. The population of entire Greenland is 55,000 with an area of over 2 million square kilometres. How on earth do you use sled patrols to look for Germans and Soviets? And then I read about the "hobby shop". Give me a break. 😂
 

Top