What happened between 1915 and 1930?

gregory5564

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Slowly but surely the hostile media is admitting the proper chronology

Desperate pictures of rural America that show 1930s-style depression actually lasted until the SIXTIES

we need to keep an eye out for duplicate events from between 1917-1930 and 1940-1970
The Appalachian people have been poor for a long time, though. They instigated the Whiskey Rebellion partly owing to poor economic conditions.

On a related note, according to American Nations (2011) by Colin Woodard, the modern-day South is made of three distinct cultural spheres: the genteel South (Virginia and North Carolina), the Deep South, and the Appalachian-descended people. The last of these groups, whose zone of influence includes Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, and southern Illinois, were largely Union-supporters during the Civil War. Today they vote the same way as the South, and support the memory of the Confederacy, and are considered as being part of Southern culture, which is rather at odds with history.
 
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Dirigible

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The Appalachian people have been poor for a long time, though. They instigated the Whiskey Rebellion partly owing to poor economic conditions.

On a related note, according to American Nations (2011) by Colin Woodard, the modern-day South is made of three distinct cultural spheres: the genteel South (Virginia and North Carolina), the Deep South, and the Appalachian-descended people. The last of these groups, whose zone of influence includes Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, and southern Illinois, were largely Union-supporters during the Civil War. Today they vote the same way as the South, and support the memory of the Confederacy, and are considered as being part of Southern culture, which is rather at odds with history.
And, that area, much like the Deep South, still has a deep seated dislike for Northerners.... It's not as prevelant in the big cities, but you get out into the country and it's absolutely there.
 

whitewave

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It was only called the "Spanish flu" because, while the rest of the world was at war and didn't want to decrease morale by publishing correct figures of flu victims, Spain was at peace at the time and was the only one accurately reporting the severity of the epidemic making it seem as if Spain alone had an epidemic. In truth, it covered the globe. Mankind has had and used bioweapons ever since they figured out they could catapult diseased corpses over a siege wall and kill everyone inside without firing a shot.
For unaltered history records I check things like morbidity and mortality reports-most civilized countries had them-lots of people in early America (1600-1800's) died of measles, rabies, whooping cough, TB, pneumonia, and, of course, the Spanish flu. In some towns (like Maine) only 2 children survived!
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And, that area, much like the Deep South, still has a deep seated dislike for Northerners.... It's not as prevelant in the big cities, but you get out into the country and it's absolutely there.
Until I was 13, I thought "damn Yankees" was one word and an entirely different race of people. Then I visited Detroit (AKA: Murder City) and realized I was right. :)
 

Magnus

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It was only called the "Spanish flu" because, while the rest of the world was at war and didn't want to decrease morale by publishing correct figures of flu victims, Spain was at peace at the time and was the only one accurately reporting the severity of the epidemic making it seem as if Spain alone had an epidemic. In truth, it covered the globe. Mankind has had and used bioweapons ever since they figured out they could catapult diseased corpses over a siege wall and kill everyone inside without firing a shot.
For unaltered history records I check things like morbidity and mortality reports-most civilized countries had them-lots of people in early America (1600-1800's) died of measles, rabies, whooping cough, TB, pneumonia, and, of course, the Spanish flu. In some towns (like Maine) only 2 children survived!
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Until I was 13, I thought "damn Yankees" was one word and an entirely different race of people. Then I visited Detroit (AKA: Murder City) and realized I was right. :)

Detroit is NOT considered "Northern" USA.
Northern, especially "Yankees" refers explicitly to the northeast. New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, maaayyybe Delaware. Thats it
 

whitewave

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"At the beginning of the Civil War, regiments from Michigan were raised to answer Lincoln's call for men. ... Over the course of the war, some 90,000 Michigan men (about 23 percent of the 1860 male population of the state) served in the Union forces. This figure includes some 1,600 black soldiers." Wiki
Last I checked, Detroit was in Michigan. By all historical accounts, Michigan was pivotal in the Civil war fighting for the Union (Yankees). Maybe Northerners have a different definition of Yankees but Southerners count anyone north of the Mason Dixon line as Yankees. No need to start another civil war over differences in terminology. :)
 

Magnus

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"At the beginning of the Civil War, regiments from Michigan were raised to answer Lincoln's call for men. ... Over the course of the war, some 90,000 Michigan men (about 23 percent of the 1860 male population of the state) served in the Union forces. This figure includes some 1,600 black soldiers." Wiki
Last I checked, Detroit was in Michigan. By all historical accounts, Michigan was pivotal in the Civil war fighting for the Union (Yankees). Maybe Northerners have a different definition of Yankees but Southerners count anyone north of the Mason Dixon line as Yankees. No need to start another civil war over differences in terminology. :)
No no civil war, sorry for coming across as abrasive... espwcially since you WhiteWave are one of my fave posters here 😊

Full disclosure: born and raised and still living in New England. A real Connecticut yankee doodle and nobody from up around here would consider Michigan a "yankee" or even a northerner. Thats midwest...Detroit might as well be in Canada haha

And the wikipedia link is suspect to me.

Back on track: i think WWI is the key to what happened 1915-1930. World War I might just be a continuation of all the revolutions. The american revolution to the war of 1812 to the civil war could all be continuation of the same war. Just described and ascribed different years by historians attempted to cloud up and cover up what really happened.
 

whitewave

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Thanks for the clarification and disclosure, Magnus. I'm frequently amazed at how much animosity still remains over the civil war that nobody in at least 3 generations has been in. Confederate monuments and flags are still being torn down and reviled. Oklahoma wasn't even a state then. I really have no dog in this fight (as the Southerners like to say). :)

You may be onto something with WWI as being key. Wonder if there were any economic depressions during that time? Always a good time to be offended by some other country when you notice that your own country is broke, eh?
 

PrincepAugus

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Thanks for the clarification and disclosure, Magnus. I'm frequently amazed at how much animosity still remains over the civil war that nobody in at least 3 generations has been in. Confederate monuments and flags are still being torn down and reviled. Oklahoma wasn't even a state then. I really have no dog in this fight (as the Southerners like to say). :)

You may be onto something with WWI as being key. Wonder if there were any economic depressions during that time? Always a good time to be offended by some other country when you notice that your own country is broke, eh?
We have three of them within around before WWI:
Panic of 1901 - Wikipedia
Panic of 1907 - Wikipedia
Life on the eve of war: the first truly global financial crisis,
World War One's financial crisis - parallels with 2008
 

asatiger1966

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Just signed on, so in responding to your current comments, I will add my local history. My family is deeply American, I have in my possession written letters and histories from before the Revolutionary War. We have one relation that was pensioned out of the North Carolina Line after the war. I stated somewhere on another thread that my family lost three cousins in Tennessee during the War of Aggression. after the war, the family moved to Kentucky, shortly thereafter moved again to Arkansas. I can on good ground state anything or anybody north of the Mason Dixon line were Yankees.

One cousin with the same last name as mine was the Surgeon General of the Confederate States of America. Just a side comment.

The influence of the parasites was always a problem. Even at the founding, but the founders thought that being this far away from Europe the ideas of America would have a chance.The war of 1812 spelled the beginning of the end for America. The British invented a problem that played into their plan of destroying the White House by burning it to the ground. The only way to stop America was to control its history. The way to control the history was to destroy any evidence.

The British were in a struggle for control of America and just before 1812 America passed the Thirteen Amendment to the Constitution and ratified it with a two state margin. Britain had to take direct action with war aimed at destroying the written evidence of that amendment. To leave that amendment standing and understood by the people would have prolonged their plans by at least 100 years.

Note: One way to control people is to control communications. No more wireless transmissions means no world wide conversations.

Human interaction is very complicated due to ignorance of the general population of the world as a whole. It may seem that I am discombobulated but no. I suffer from too much information LOL. Koben has rightly focused on the last 200-300 years. The practice of Psychology arrived at our doorstep along with the German rewriting of world history, a form of control. Psychology gave society a new view into human nature which is good. It also created a form of new control over the person in having a reason for your actions that were beyond your control.

The world wars WW1 and WW2 were just continuations of the original Revolutionary War. That last was my opinion.
 

freezetime26

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Yeah, the architecture is from another world. People just don't realize that we've lost it because there are still so many old buildings around. Everyone just stopped, world wide. This should be worth a study even for a mainstream historian, because it's so absurd. Aren't human societies supposed to be so multi-layered that such a top-down decision wouldn't be possible 100 years ago?

Economics can be an answer though, and world economy was probably already in central control during that time. If you take away the money, people will no longer be able to afford decent buildings. This is the incentive that to this day leads to the creation of cheap and ugly buildings for the poor masses. Add to this the crisis that is war itself, and this scenario becomes even more likely.
In my honest opinion, capitalism died in 1913 with the creation of the FED and when we got rid of the gold standard that worked since dawn of times (Now we have central banking economy). Creating money out of nothing (Fiduciary money) with no value to back it up can lead to disastrous consequences, every year money devaluates, thats why real estate is so expensive nowadays (Speculators are part of the problem too). In top of that, when you create money out of nothing you can wage more wars. I feel like this century is the end of civilization. Communism won the war.
 

ISeenItFirst

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In my honest opinion, capitalism died in 1913 with the creation of the FED and when we got rid of the gold standard that worked since dawn of times (Now we have central banking economy). Creating money out of nothing (Fiduciary money) with no value to back it up can lead to disastrous consequences, every year money devaluates, thats why real estate is so expensive nowadays (Speculators are part of the problem too). In top of that, when you create money out of nothing you can wage more wars. I feel like this century is the end of civilization. Communism won the war.
I don't think I've ever heard it called fiduciary money, but I like the term. Fiat, is what I'm used to. I agree, and it's also way more complicated. The FED was actually the 3rd national bank in the US. Putting Jackson on the twenty was the victory dance.

Housing didn't get out of whack until the 70s with the CRA and Carter, but that too had it's roots in 1913. Wilson sure regretted it in his old age.

How this relates to the 1915-30 time period. Not sure. Seems like a period for setting some new goals. The global machinations shifting focus if you will.
 

Magnus

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I don't think I've ever heard it called fiduciary money, but I like the term. Fiat, is what I'm used to. I agree, and it's also way more complicated. The FED was actually the 3rd national bank in the US. Putting Jackson on the twenty was the victory dance.

Housing didn't get out of whack until the 70s with the CRA and Carter, but that too had it's roots in 1913. Wilson sure regretted it in his old age.

How this relates to the 1915-30 time period. Not sure. Seems like a period for setting some new goals. The global machinations shifting focus if you will.
The term is indeed FIAT.

Fiduciary means something entirely else. Fiduciary means a responsibility to a stakeholder. For example, if someone purchases a life insurance policy, then the insurance company providing the policy has a FIDUCIARY responsibility to the purchaser.

It is important for us to use exact language, especially on a forum such as this.

An example of poor grasp of language would be Martin Liedke, who often mistranslates Latin or French words in his videos, and goes on a tangent for minutes at a time, obviously showing no prep work done beforehand. I dont have a specific example, because I dont watch his videos anymore because of that very reason. I am sure others know just what I mean
In my honest opinion, capitalism died in 1913 with the creation of the FED and when we got rid of the gold standard that worked since dawn of times (Now we have central banking economy). Creating money out of nothing (Fiduciary money) with no value to back it up can lead to disastrous consequences, every year money devaluates, thats why real estate is so expensive nowadays (Speculators are part of the problem too). In top of that, when you create money out of nothing you can wage more wars. I feel like this century is the end of civilization. Communism won the war.
The gold standard worked since the dawn of time?
So man skipped the barter process and went straight to gold backed central banking?
 

ISeenItFirst

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The term is indeed FIAT.

Fiduciary means something entirely else. Fiduciary means a responsibility to a stakeholder. For example, if someone purchases a life insurance policy, then the insurance company providing the policy has a FIDUCIARY responsibility to the purchaser.

It is important for us to use exact language, especially on a forum such as this.

An example of poor grasp of language would be Martin Liedke, who often mistranslates Latin or French words in his videos, and goes on a tangent for minutes at a time, obviously showing no prep work done beforehand. I dont have a specific example, because I dont watch his videos anymore because of that very reason. I am sure others know just what I mean
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The gold standard worked since the dawn of time?
So man skipped the barter process and went straight to gold backed central banking?
Fiduciary just implies an element of trust. I liked the term, because that's the only thing that provides it's value. Is trust in its value. I know it is not the normal term, but I think it fits.
 

UnusualBean

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I'm skeptical that the Great Depression ever even fully ended. Today fewer than half of Americans have tap water that's safe to drink or bathe in, the undoctored unemployment rate is over 20%, there are food deserts all over the country, a third of America's roads aren't paved, nearly a tenth of the country's bridges are in need of repair, a quarter of adults have untreated cavities, and up to a quarter of Americans have to refuse medical treatment because they can't afford it (probably the same quarter who can't get dental work done). And there are so, so many more things that could be added to that list.

But we have smartphones, so we must be doing okay (y)

Anyway, more on topic: The early 20th century is when people started really moving towards a plant-based diet, which in the mid-century turned into a plant-based low fat diet.

Below is a video about a study done that fed cats a 33% healthful diet and a 66% unnatural diet (for a cat, anyway). The cats became so unhealthy across generations that they could no longer reproduce after 3 generations and their bones were so weak that one poor kitten even broke its back. Cats are practically a liquid, so you can imagine that it'd take a lot of degeneration for a cat to be that fragile.


Humans have more flexible digestive systems than cats, but we're already starting to see widespread effects of skeletal malformation. Up to 3/4 of today's children may end up needing braces at some point in their life due to malformed jaws :sick:
 

Searching

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I'm skeptical that the Great Depression ever even fully ended. Today fewer than half of Americans have tap water that's safe to drink or bathe in, the undoctored unemployment rate is over 20%, there are food deserts all over the country, a third of America's roads aren't paved, nearly a tenth of the country's bridges are in need of repair, a quarter of adults have untreated cavities, and up to a quarter of Americans have to refuse medical treatment because they can't afford it
Applause, Applause, Applause

'Merica. Livin' the dream.
 

Magnus

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Fiduciary just implies an element of trust. I liked the term, because that's the only thing that provides it's value. Is trust in its value. I know it is not the normal term, but I think it fits.

You *thinking* it fits doesn't make it so.
What exactly are you trying to do by misappropriating words? Fiat is the term people use and understand.

You think the government thinks it has a fiduciary responsibility to the people? Then explain inflation...

Using precise language is the way we can effectively communicate. Thinking otherwise is either willfully ignorant/immature, or else devious.

Because you *think* a word fits, how are others supposed to know what you are thinking? ...by the *words* you use to express your thoughts! Can you understand what I am trying to convey here?
 

LordAverage

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On the architecture point, It's funny living in Australia (being such a recent country, relatively). We just don't have those amazing buildings that you see in Europe, and no one questions why we don't build things like that anymore, it's kinda strange. People just assume its due to building regulations I suppose (we aren't allowed to build the gorgeous works of art that are very old buildings anymore I guess???).

If anything the quality of buildings only seems to be getting worse over time.
 

trismegistus

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On the architecture point, It's funny living in Australia (being such a recent country, relatively). We just don't have those amazing buildings that you see in Europe, and no one questions why we don't build things like that anymore, it's kinda strange. People just assume its due to building regulations I suppose (we aren't allowed to build the gorgeous works of art that are very old buildings anymore I guess???).

If anything the quality of buildings only seems to be getting worse over time.

That is a similar observation to one made by Graham Hancock in Magicians of the Gods. I will start by saying he is one of those people principal in my awakening to help me shake off preconceived notions of ancient history and look at the evidence. Years later, I recognize that he is not 100% accurate about everything (he even had to write a follow up to that book in order to account for the Younger Dryas cataclysm) because things can change so rapidly.

Anyway, his observation was that ancient Egyptian architecture did not have a linear progression of build quality, it had the exact opposite. What he found was the stuff that was underneath some of the later works were actually of much better quality, from an engineering standpoint. In addition, when Spanish Conquistadors arrived in central and south America, they asked who built the fantastic structures of Teotihuacan, the natives replied that the structures were discovered, not built by them.

The implication is this: the reason architecture gets worse is because the people who created them are long gone. What is created afterward is a poor facsimile of the originals since the original knowledge has been lost for the most part. Of course, the knowledge may not actually be lost per se, the secrets of their architecture could have been saved and protected through various bloodlines or secret organizations (or not so secret ones, see the Vatican).

Another much more boring explanation is that there is little to no demand for high-skilled labor to create buildings, most just want it done quickly and for cheap. And yes, federal/state/city laws will also make it difficult for certain things to be done anymore - - I am not in that industry so my knowledge of exactly what those laws would be are beyond me.

I was visiting Austin, TX a few months ago, while I was there I decided to walk around the Barton Springs area through the neighborhoods. If you haven't been there, it is replete with lovely houses built between late 1800s-pre WWII. Ornate architecture, solid woodwork, and well maintained to boot. However, inbetween some of these homes are absolute abominations of modern architecture. Giant, gray, rectangular cement "modern" houses punctured by windows that were haphazardly placed and of varying sizes. These are the "new rich" in Austin, those who made their nut selling their homes in Silicon Valley to move out to Austin where their company relocated for tax breaks. Their homes pop up like tumors in these neighborhoods - - they could give a shit about their neighbors as they likely plan on flipping it in a few years to the next tasteless technocrat who rolls through that neighborhood. All I could think about was the inevitability of the nice local families eventually getting priced out of their own neighborhood to make way for these people, and in the next 20 years the entire neighborhood would look like a soulless cement compound.
 

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