What did George Bernard Shaw mean in his Saint Joan

KorbenDallas

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#1
George Bernard Shaw has the following exchange in his Saint Joan. Apparently the Nobleman had hard time considering some people as French, or English. Any ideas as to why?

THE CHAPLAIN. He is only a Frenchman, my lord.

THE NOBLEMAN. A Frenchman! Where did you pick up that expression? Are these Burgundians and Bretons and Picards and Gascons beginning to call themselves Frenchmen, just as our fellows are beginning to call themselves Englishmen? They actually talk of France and England as their countries. Theirs, if you please! What is to become of me and you if that way of thinking comes into fashion?
 

KorbenDallas

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#3
To me it looks like this "Nobleman" does not consider Burgundians and Bretons and Picards and Gascons to be Frenchmen. Same goes for some "fellows" in England. The question is why?
 

KorbenDallas

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#5
In the Bohemian Grove videos they worship an owl. So I’m not sure that Tartarian is a good thing :)
 

KorbenDallas

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#7
It could be a symbol of anything. As far as documented things go, we have this. With the lack of the exact info we are left to speculate, I think.

tartarie_owl.jpg
 
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