What are you looking at?

jd755

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Not a clue which forum this post belongs in so here it is.
Digging into just how easy it is to fake structural history under the guise of renovation and restoration I was off trying to track down 'old' cast stone recipes when up popped this superb example of how we cannot trust our own eyes when it comes to sculpture and structural elements. It is breathtaking how skilled the fakers are as these images show.

Given this is the case whenever one is near 'ancient sculpture' perhaps the thing to do is consider the artifact from a position of 'this is a fake' then look for clues.
gallery

Figurative Remodelling

Using specialist lime based conservation materials these figures were painstakinly restored to their original form. They had not only suffered from severe decay to the sandstone but they had also previously been very poorly “repaired” and then painted. Once the paint and cement based mortar “repairs” were removed from the figures it became apparent that there was very little of the original detail left to work form. The local library photo archives were trawled for any hint to the original form, luckily some were found and they were just good enough to allow the remodelling to take shape, with limbs and faces restored they finally emerged just how they would have appeared over 100 years ago.

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Mondea

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It is only logical to assume that most of the sculptures have undergone some sort of renovation. I guess the hurdle would be identifying important removed details from the original piece.
 

whitewave

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It is only logical to assume that most of the sculptures have undergone some sort of renovation. I guess the hurdle would be identifying important removed details from the original piece.
Most likely many "ancient ruins/artifacts" have been renovated. My husband was watching some Ancient Aliens show the other day so I popped in to ask if he wanted any more tea and happened to glance at the tv screen. It was just starting and was about Stonehenge. I immediately noticed that one of the stones pictured in the foreground had something in it and its outer "stone" covering had chipped off on one edge. I had him rewind and freeze so I could point it out to him and he was flabbergasted. It looked like a rectangular, possibly metal structure with a stone looking facade. Until that moment, I always assumed Stonehenge to be a genuine ancient artifact. Now I don't know if it was manufactured more recently or just renovated.

I know it's possible to make stone-looking things. We have a car dealership in our area that, as it was being built, started working on their landscaping. I actually saw the workers "making stone" by pouring and shaping some concrete-ish looking liquid. It had various colors like stone (which is rarely just one color), had the shape of natural stone and, to this day, looks like big boulders were brought in for landscaping but they're totally manufactured. Now I'm wondering how old Stonehenge actually is.
 
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