Welcome to Tenochtitlan as it was in 1520

KorbenDallas

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Between July 1519 and September 1526, Hernando Cortés (1485-1547), the soldier and adventurer who in 1519-21 conquered for Spain what is now central and southern Mexico, sent five extended letters to Emperor Charles V in which he described his exploits and placed himself and his actions in a favorable light. This book contains the first Latin edition of Cortes’s second letter. In it, Cortés gives an account of his first meeting with the Aztec emperor, Montezuma II. Dated October 30, 1520, the letter was translated from Spanish into Latin by Petrus Savorgnanus and printed in Nuremberg, Germany, in 1524. This printing also contains the first published plan of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlán (present-day Mexico City), which Cortés and his army attacked and destroyed in May 1521. Also included is an early map of the Caribbean Basin.

This printing contains the first published plan of the Aztec city of Tenochtitlán.
1520


Tenochtitlan_1520_1.pngTenochtitlan_1520.jpgTenochtitlan_1520_1.jpg

Am I the only one, or in 1520 Tenochtitlan looked like a European town, considering that it was only conquered in 1521? Who built all those European looking buildings?

Moctezuma II
How native does he look?
Moctezuma II_2.jpgMoctezuma II_1.jpg

Source titled, "The Splendid Narrative of Ferdinand Cortes About the New Spain of the Sea and Ocean Transmitted to the Most Sacred and Invincible, Always August Charles Emperor of the Romans, King of the Spaniards in the Year of the Lord 1520: In Which is Contained Many Things Worthy of Knowledge and Admiration About the Excellent Cities of Their Provinces…Above All About the Famous City Temixtitan and Its Diverse Wonders, Which Will Wondrously Please the Reader"

Temix Titan = Tenochtitlan

temix titan_1.png

Makes me wonder why Cortes himself would call the city Temix Titan? We all know the traditional meaning of the word Titan.
  • In Greek mythology, the Titans were members of the second generation of divine beings, descending from the primordial deities and preceding the Olympians. They ruled during the legendary Golden Age, and also comprised the first pantheon of Greek deities.
 

mythstifieD

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Wait, what? Are you seriously telling me that Moctezuma II has a crown with the double headed black eagle?! And that city looks like it was built by none other than the Venetians (aka Phoenicians). I need to dig on this place more as it sticks out like a sore thumb.

Personally, my first reaction to seeing such a beautiful place would be to utterly destroy it as well. It's just the typical thing we do when we're exploring a New World. Why preserve or understand anything? We're just hear to melt down the gold and raise some hell.

800px-Tenochtitlan[1].jpg

You build a city like this for extreme protection. Was there a lot of violent competitive tribes around?
Lake Texcoco
(Spanish: Lago de Texcoco) was a natural lake within the "Anahuac" or Valley of Mexico. Lake Texcoco is best known as where the Aztecs built the city of Tenochtitlan, which was located on an island within the lake. After the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire, efforts to control flooding by the Spanish led to most of the lake being drained. The entire lake basin is now almost completely occupied by Mexico City, the capital of the present-day nation of Mexico.
Nothing weird about that!
 
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mythstifieD

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This is on a Venice wall. Also, Venice had its hay day in the 16th century. Coincidence?

And did they build those HUGE pyramids on a swampy island? That doesn't make sense. Conveniently the Spaniards drained the whole thing. What the heck!
 

BStankman

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Yes, that pesky Tartary double head eagle again. Another neo classical Tartary city in the new world.

Spaniards came and killed them all for being pagan, and then felt really bad.
So they built a "roman aqueduct" for the handful of survivors.
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Then the most pious missionaries built a pagan shrine to Neptune.


Queretaro-fuente-neptuno-1.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Yup, that aqueduct story is something to investigate. Rebuilt three times. Funny how only a little portion survived.

Really makes you wonder what that entire city originally looked like.
 

RowOfEleven

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Yes, that pesky Tartary double head eagle again. Another neo classical Tartary city in the new world.


Then the most pious missionaries built a pagan shrine to Neptune.


View attachment 5081
Here's who built it according to Wiki:

Francisco_eduardo_tresguerras.jpg

Francisco Eduardo Tresguerras (October 13, 1759, Celaya, Guanajuato – August 3, 1833, Celaya) was a prominent Mexican architect and a painter. He was active during the colonial period and early independence.

Believing he had a religious vocation, he entered a monastery in Mexico City, but soon changed his mind and returned to Celaya and was married. He began working as an artist — painting, sculpture and engraving. He soon requested permission to work as an architect. His first architectural works were the Fountain of Neptune (1797) and an arch commemorating the proclamation of Charles IV as king. Both of these are in Querétaro.

Says he wasn't a colonist/missionary, but born in Mexico. However, he did dedicate an arch to the king of Spain. Was he from Mexico, or was he kin to earlier colonists?

What's curious, he was supposedly religious enough to enter a monastery... But left. Maybe he was rebelling by making a giant pagan fountain? "That'll stick it to 'em!"
 

whitewave

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Wonder who commissioned that work of art (fountain)? Someone had to pay for it-doubt he worked for free. Usually the Catholic church were the ones commissioning works of art (or rich nobles). They were the only ones who could afford such luxuries.

Masonic explanation of the 2 headed eagle: THE DOUBLE-HEADED EAGLE AND WHENCE IT CAME
 
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mythstifieD

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Wow, mythstifiedD, a population of 15 million in the early 1500's.
I totally missed that detail! Amazing. How does such a large place get forgotten? I'm adding it to my 'evidence' pile of a massive coverup of the New World during the Age of Exploration. I even had this funny thought the other day that perhaps the Spanish had to go to the new world to intervene in a war going on there, they had to protect their assets and accidentally revealed that the new world existed. They rushed to officially "discover" it with Columbus, but he only found the Caribbean at first. John Cabot comes along and says "Hey guys, there's a whole fucking CONTINENT here" and subsequently England is told to shut the f**k up, and the Pope lays the smack down (which eventually leads to the schism).
 

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