Weather Vanes vs. Air Travel, and may be Flags

KorbenDallas

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I have to create this thread as a supporting thread for one of my future major articles. At the same time, I think it can stand on its own. So we have Air Travel and Weather Vanes to talk about. To a lesser degree, but Flags could also be involved here.

Weather Vanes
A weather vane (wind vane, weathercock) is an instrument for showing the direction of the wind. It is typically used as an architectural ornament to the highest point of a building. The word vane comes from the Old English word fana meaning "flag".

Today, this Weather Vane device is considered to be more of a decoration, than that of a necessity. The speed of wind could mater, of course, but its direction... Well, who cares about the wind direction anyways. We care about things like temperature and precipitation, for the most part. Some, with medical conditions might even go as far as being concerned about the air pressure.

Who else might care? Probably somebody related to sea travel, or air travel. But why would we need these Weather Vanes in the urban environment. The reason I'm asking these questions lies within the images below. Please feel free to reference zoomable images I'm using in this thread.

The above images allegedly pertain to 1665, and can be found here. In reality there are hundreds more similar images, and nothing besides architecture really stands out. At first, I thought we had christian crosses up on top. When I zoomed in, they ended up being Weather Vanes.

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The Weather Vanes could of course be just a simple decorative accent. At the same time we can not be explaining everything with decorations, rituals and religion. The Weather Vane is a device , which is supposed to serve a specific purpose: show the direction of the wind.



Apart from being decorations, what could be the purpose of the Weather Vanes mounted so high in the... 17th Century? One would need a set of binoculars to see what the reading is. Besides, why would they care about the wind direction at that height? There are no roads up there, and people only walk on the ground. So, why bother installing them that high? Put your Weather Vanes close to the ground, where they could somewhat matter.

Air Travel
Air travel is a form of travel in vehicles such as helicopters, hot air balloons, blimps, gliders, hang gliding, parachuting, airplanes, jets, or anything else that can sustain flight.

Yep, that is exactly what I suggest at this point. The Weather Vanes were not meant for decorative purposes. They were meant to show the wind direction to those who needed it at that height. To the airships, that is... and prior to the 17th century. For some food for thought you can read this 1880s, 1890s wikipedia Mystery Airship article. Or this one here.

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Anchoring
Well, and for the last "crazy" suggestion I will offer the Stonehenge-like objects. I think there could be some anchoring possibilities there. As in attaching one's airship like you would a boat. And I do not mean the fake one in Great Britain, but the ones similar in appearance.

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KD Summary: In my opinion the Weather Vanes mounted on top of the older, or "ancient" buildings had practical, rather than decorative purposes. To be exact, it was to show the direction of the wind to the pilots of the ancient airships. I understand that it probably sounds way too bananas crazy for some. Yet, if there was a practical purpose for a Weather Vane mounted 150 feet above the ground level, that would be my answer.


Once again, this thread is meant to be a supporting thread for a much bigger article I'm working on. It will be much more convenient to link to an existing supporting thread, versus trying to fit tons of info into one thread.
 

wizz33

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yess i thought that a long time i think that everyone had a personal flying device.
ranging from boots and backpacks to bicycles like and cars.
that also means that everyone could live a continent or in space away.
and that every thing was done form the air.
 

ScottFreeman

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Are you kidding! Weathervanes that far up. :unsure:

Not so far out there at all, I also have this nagging feeling about, not all, but some towers being an anchoring spot for balloons or dirigibles.
The empire state building in NY was originally designed (perhaps used?) with a 200 ft mast to dock zeppelins/airships. I can't think of any reason to do so, as embarking and disembarking would be impossible, other than to recharge batteries. Wasn't it the empire state building that had power production built in during construction? Something about Tesla and a huge generator sticks in my mind. It seems like I remember reading that one of these generated four times more power than the building required and nobody had any explanation why. If electric airships recharged huge batteries...that might explain it.
 
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asatiger1966

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I have to create this thread as a supporting thread for one of my future major articles. At the same time, I think it can stand on its own. So we have Air Travel and Weather Vanes to talk about. To a lesser degree, but Flags could also be involved here.

Weather Vanes
A weather vane (wind vane, weathercock) is an instrument for showing the direction of the wind. It is typically used as an architectural ornament to the highest point of a building. The word vane comes from the Old English word fana meaning "flag".

Today, this Weather Vane device is considered to be more of a decoration, than that of a necessity. The speed of wind could mater, of course, but its direction... Well, who cares about the wind direction anyways. We care about things like temperature and precipitation, for the most part. Some, with medical conditions might even go as far as being concerned about the air pressure.

Who else might care? Probably somebody related to sea travel, or air travel. But why would we need these Weather Vanes in the urban environment. The reason I'm asking these questions lies within the images below. Please feel free to reference zoomable images I'm using in this thread.

The above images allegedly pertain to 1665, and can be found here. In reality there are hundreds more similar images, and nothing besides architecture really stands out. At first, I thought we had christian crosses up on top. When I zoomed in, they ended up being Weather Vanes.

The Weather Vanes could of course be just a simple decorative accent. At the same time we can not be explaining everything with decorations, rituals and religion. The Weather Vane is a device , which is supposed to serve a specific purpose: show the direction of the wind.



Apart from being decorations, what could be the purpose of the Weather Vanes mounted so high in the... 17th Century? One would need a set of binoculars to see what the reading is. Besides, why would they care about the wind direction at that height? There are no roads up there, and people only walk on the ground. So, why bother installing them that high? Put your Weather Vanes close to the ground, where they could somewhat matter.

Air Travel
Air travel is a form of travel in vehicles such as helicopters, hot air balloons, blimps, gliders, hang gliding, parachuting, airplanes, jets, or anything else that can sustain flight.

Yep, that is exactly what I suggest at this point. The Weather Vanes were not meant for decorative purposes. They were meant to show the wind direction to those who needed it at that height. To the airships, that is... and prior to the 17th century. For some food for thought you can read this 1880s, 1890s wikipedia Mystery Airship article. Or this one here.

Well, and for the last "crazy" suggestion I will offer the Stonehenge-like objects. I think there could be some anchoring possibilities there. As in attaching one's airship like you would a boat. And I do not mean the fake one in Great Britain, but the ones similar in appearance.

KD Summary: In my opinion the Weather Vanes mounted on top of the older, or "ancient" buildings had practical, rather than decorative purposes. To be exact, it was to show the direction of the wind to the pilots of the ancient airships. I understand that it probably sounds way too bananas crazy for some. Yet, if there was a practical purpose for a Weather Vane mounted 150 feet above the ground level, that would be my answer.


Once again, this thread is meant to be a supporting thread for a much bigger article I'm working on. It will be much more convenient to link to an existing supporting thread, versus trying to fit tons of info into one thread.
Again "we do not know, what we do not know"
I agree the past weather-vanes probably had multiple uses and changed over time.

The airships seemed to occur at the end of Tartary's destruction. Maybe recon to see where the enemy was and what forces they had. Gives them time to retreat to an untouchable land, space, maybe underground?

The photos below show what was publicly known of airships at the time. Think about our hidden technology as of now. Why would the past governments not hide the real stuff?

1675716758
16759
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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I think to produce maps like this in the 1750s.
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They were flying something like that. What made them float in the air remains to be figured out.

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17107171081710917111
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More of these images are in this thread here.
Or we could go with this Bartolomeu de Gusmão's magnet powered airship. This guy deserves a thread of his own. Wondering whose design manual he was able to acquire ... Make sure you check his Wiki out.

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In 1709 he presented a petition to King João V of Portugal, seeking royal favour for his invention of an airship, in which he expressed the greatest confidence. The contents of this petition have been preserved, together with a picture and description of his airship. Developing the ideas of Francesco Lana de Terzi, S.J., Gusmão wanted to spread a huge sail over a boat-like body like the cover of a transport wagon; the boat itself was to contain tubes through which, when there was no wind, air would be blown into the sail by means of bellows. The vessel was to be propelled by the agency of magnets which were to be encased in two hollow metal balls. The public test of the machine, which was set for June 24, 1709, did not take place.
  • His designs included a ship to sail in the air consisting of a triangular gas-filled pyramid, but he died without making progress.
  • One account of Gusmão's work suggests that the Portuguese Inquisition forbade him to continue his aeronautic investigations and persecuted him because of them, but this is probably a later invention.
 
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