Wars of 1812: Russia vs. France, United States vs United Kingdom, and Co

KorbenDallas

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There was a whole bunch of wars around the same time. Anyone else thinks that global powers were fighting it out, and the former regime lost?

I come to think that all those wars were one and the same, with somewhat of a spread out in time to make it look more natural.

Coincidentally, these are the same times when the whole world was supposed to be building. Yet the whole world was fighting.
 

humanoidlord

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There was a whole bunch of wars around the same time. Anyone else thinks that global powers were fighting it out, and the former regime lost?

I come to think that all those wars were one and the same, with somewhat spread out in time to make it look more natural.

Coincidentally, these are the same times when the whole world was supposed to be building. Yet the whole world was fighting.
i find that weird too, its almost as if everyone sundelly realized, how problematic the world was and started fighting it
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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i find that weird too, its almost as if everyone sundelly realized, how problematic the world was and started fighting it
So much info about wars, and none about worldwide construction efforts happening simultaneously.

Armies participating were unbelievably huge. Napoleon had like 600,000 people. Hard to imagine what kind of supply infrastructure there had to be in place to feed that many people, and quite a few horses for so long.
 

humanoidlord

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So much info about wars, and none about worldwide construction efforts happening simultaneously.

Armies participating were unbelievably huge. Napoleon had like 600,000 people. Hard to imagine what kind of supply infrastructure there had to be in place to feed that many people, and quite a few horses for so long.
wow i never thought about that!
it was already hard for hitler
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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I have read an opinion that, that real population of this planet in the early 19th century was 80-200 bln people. That would support all the ridiculous army numbers we meet here and there. Of course, today's historians say that their counterparts from the past were exaggerating. Yet, greater numbers would explain quite a few things.
 

Tonep

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There was a whole bunch of wars around the same time. Anyone else thinks that global powers were fighting it out, and the former regime lost?

I come to think that all those wars were one and the same, with somewhat of a spread out in time to make it look more natural.

Coincidentally, these are the same times when the whole world was supposed to be building. Yet the whole world was fighting.
The link for the list of wars says there is no page by that name.

I found the link. Its titled Wars of 1800-1899. I would have copieVd and paste it but i have a flip phone and dont have that option. very interesting, raises a lot of questions. 56 wars in the first 9 years. Some of the participates i never heard of
 
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GroundhogLfe

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I was going through some maps from a map package I had downloaded some time ago and found out a couple of interesting ones.

These are from the latter 18th century prior to this war.

17221


17222


Here we have 2 different Russia shown. In the one above Russia Europe & Russia Asia and the one below Russied Europe and Tartarie Russienne.

My question here is which Russia did Napoleon attack? Everything suggests it wasn't the European Russia, but this eastern Russia. As the Czar resided in St. Petersburgh, then the parade afterwards and even the coin honoring Napoleon in the early 20th century in Russia.

Hypothesis: What if the Russian expansion to Siberia was actually the opposite and it was an expansion from Siberia / Tartary. The early 18th century wars could suggest that with all the Muscovite / Tartar activity in the area as a natural continuation to that. In the early 18th century the Steppe people influence was deep in to Europe with the Turks holding most of the Balkans and the Muscovite & Tartar offensive deep in to Finnish lands (as part of Swedish kingdom at those times). The Polish king was also against the Swedes collaborating with these people at those times. All of this would be a logical and rather straightforward explanation for those times.

A bit over 100 years later Napoleon would assist the European Russian Czar to finish them off of being a threat to Europe. The European Russia also cleared the Turks from the European lands. We must be careful who we attribute with what deeds. This would most likely be European Russia, the Romanovs & France, Napoleon vs "Eastern Russia".


[addition]

More meat to the hypothesis: As I went through the maps some more I found the earliest depiction of these 2 Russia being from the 1700. This would work rather well with the history that Peter the Great broke free from the Muscovite control of the Czars and regained Russia to form an European Muscovy / Russia and this caused the split to become Muscovite Tartary / Russia to the east. Prior to this I was not able to find maps suggesting this, just different Tartaries, but it does not mean they would not exist.

17274

[/addition]

The maps are from 1785 by Carrington Bowles and from 1790 by Johann Walch. The latest addition is titled from the 1700 by Guillaume De Isle.
 
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milhaus

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Came across this today and thought it might be relevant.

Military Tract of 1812 - Wikipedia

Military Tract of 1812




US Atlas of 1810

On May 6, 1812, an act of Congress was passed 2 Stat. 729 (PDF) which set aside bounty lands as payment to volunteer soldiers for the War against the British (War of 1812). The land was set aside in western territories that became part of the present states of Arkansas, Michigan and Illinois.

However, lands in Missouri were later substituted for those in Michigan, due to a report by the surveyor-general of the United States, Edward Tiffin, which quite misleadingly described the land in Michigan that had been set aside for this purpose as undesirable. Other later acts of Congress, until 1855, continued to address the needs of soldiers wishing to redeem their bounty land warrants and efforts continued to try to provide suitable land area for these soldiers.


Tracts of land were given outright by the states, and later by the federal government as partial compensation (or "bounty") for service in times of military conflict. Such bounty was also occasionally used by the government to incite men to serve in war or conflicts. Bounty land warrants were issued from the colonial period until 1858, when the program was discontinued, and five years later, in 1863, the rights to locate and take possession of bounty lands ceased.

The great bulk of early bounty land at the time of the Revolution was in Virginia, as it existed in colonial times. Since Virginia provided the great bulk of fighting men in the Revolution, the first bounty lands were to be located between the Mississippi, Ohio and Green Rivers in what is now Kentucky. However, this area did not provide enough land, and the Virginia Military Tract was established, which was in what is now the state of Ohio. Continental Army soldiers from Virginia were the only group allowed to settle in the Ohio area, while state soldiers were to use the lands in Kentucky. The United States Military District was a 2,500,000-acre (10,000 km2) tract in eastern Ohio established by the Federal Government in 1796 for bounties to soldiers from other states.

Soldiers of the War of 1812, who received 160 acres (0.6 km2) each, were required to locate their warrants by lottery. Most soldiers or their heirs decided, however, against moving great distances to take up their claims. Instead, they sold their warrants to speculators. One company alone acquired 900,000 acres (3,600 km²). Such large-scale land holdings aroused frontier hostility against absentee speculators. Squatters settled upon the lands, ignoring titles and rights. Many speculators were unable to realize a quick profit and, faced with ever-increasing taxation, lost their titles or sold their lands at a loss of money.

The white population of Illinois exploded after the War of 1812, exceeding 50,000 in 1820 and 150,000 in 1830. In 1828, the U.S. government liaison, Thomas Forsyth, informed the native Indian tribes that they should begin vacating their settlements east of the Mississippi.
I don't have much to add but I think for some reason acts like these are an important piece to the 1812 and overall puzzle. I'm also thinking about these wagon trails. It makes sense to use the same one, of course, but who decided it initially? Then everyone is mostly going to these preselected destinations.
(YOU ARE FREE TO MOVE WHERE WE TELL YOU. YOU ARE FREE TO MOVE WHERE WE TELL YOU). :ROFLMAO:

What would people see if they ventured far from the beaten path? Would they have seen "savages" or cities? Abandoned, destroyed, populated?

I'm doubtful that most people would be willing to find out. After all, the Govt was taking care of surveying the land to decide what areas people were safe to live in.
 

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