van Gogh expressed a desire to be 'John the Reaper' (Jack) before Jack the Ripper struck London

Qmeta

Active member
Messages
76
Reactions
141
Some lite entertainment for those interested in 'Jack the Ripper'. I've looked into it and found that a 'crazy conspiracy theory' from a few years ago about Vincent van Gogh being 'Jack the Ripper' has some validity.

What's interesting is how most people don't seem to think it is possible because he was 'busy' working on paintings (his painting style wasn't complicated) and lived in France (he lived about 24 hours away, and Jack the Ripper struck sporadically and only on weekends)

Again, don't take it too seriously. I know how some people can get about stuff like this.

A little back story.

On March 23, 1885, Vincent van Gogh's father, a pastor of a church, was found dead on the doorstep of their house right after Vincent's arrival. Vincent had a short temper and would often argue with his father about his inability to do something with his life. Vincent also threatened to kill him. (And later, he would attack Paul Gaugin with a razor before he cut off his own earlobe, supposedly.)

Three months later, Vincent wrote to his brother, "I had just such a longing to be something like a grass-mower," or hanneke maaier in his original Dutch text. 'Maaier' means 'a reaper'. It is interesting to note that 'hanneke' is the diminutive form of the Dutch name 'Hanne', which is feminine. The masculine variant is 'Hahns', or 'John' in English, for which 'Jack' is a common nickname.

So, essentially, a mentally ill man named Vincent van Gogh wanted to be John (Jack), a reaper, three years before 'Jack the Ripper' struck London.

In June, 1888, Vincent began to add reapers to his paintings. That month, he wrote to his brother, "You tell society that it’s squalid because the whore makes us think of meat, of the market. Very good, that, the whore is like meat at the butcher’s."

The first 'Jack the Ripper' murder (from 'the canonical five') was two months later.

It is also interesting that faces (and a body) can be found in his paintings around the time of Jack the Ripper (1888). Here is a sample:

16577


16564


Vincent mentions Whitechapel seven times in his letters to his brother. He had not only lived in that part of London previously but was familiar with the backalleyways of Whitechapel, as well as its prostitutes and opium dens.

Jack the Ripper's famous 'Dear Boss' letter threatened to cut off a lady’s ears in September of that year, with some victims having had their ears cut off. When he cut off his own earlobe three months later, he mailed it to a woman working in a brothel in Arles. (He visited prostitutes frequently.)

Vincent cut his ear on the night of December 23 and was admitted to the hospital the next morning. The numerous 'Jack the Ripper' letters sent to the police and media — 157 in just a few months — also stopped on the 23rd and resumed the day after he was released from the hospital, sixteen days later. (He would need a day to travel up to London after his release.) Before that, the longest stretch of time without a 'Jack the Ripper' letter had been only five days.

I've added some other details for this info here

Again, something to amuse and entertain :)
 
Last edited:

LynxSeryn

New member
Messages
4
Reactions
4
Interesting theory. I've always been drawn to the Ripper case, and I definitely believe him to be an artist of sorts--coincides with aggression, heightened emotionality, etc. (I think that writer was the closest to an actual potentiality for the Ripper) Can't say I fully believe in this theory, but it does have some interesting merits. The paintings, I just don't see the hidden images or relevance. But, the correlation of time with his being out of commission and the letter's stopping is certainly worthy of note. I'd love to see this case put to rest at some point, though I know it's unlikely.
 

Lurck

Member
Messages
30
Reactions
60
That's a good theory all right, but there is also evidence that Jack the Ripper was a story invented by a journalist who was paid to come up with crime stories for newspapers. Miles Mathis has found that most serial killings as well as mass shootings seem to be hoaxes designed by the JTB (jackasses that be) to raise fear in the public, which is good for business and for maintaining power. His site is at Updates . In a paper on the Zodiac Killer etc at http://mileswmathis.com/zodiac.pdf it's mentioned who the journalist was who supposedly made up the stories. Some more info on the Ripper is mentioned in the paper on Holmes, America's first serial killer, who apparently was also a fake story.
 

LynxSeryn

New member
Messages
4
Reactions
4
That's a good theory all right, but there is also evidence that Jack the Ripper was a story invented by a journalist who was paid to come up with crime stories for newspapers. Miles Mathis has found that most serial killings as well as mass shootings seem to be hoaxes designed by the JTB (jackasses that be) to raise fear in the public, which is good for business and for maintaining power. His site is at Updates . In a paper on the Zodiac Killer etc at http://mileswmathis.com/zodiac.pdf it's mentioned who the journalist was who supposedly made up the stories. Some more info on the Ripper is mentioned in the paper on Holmes, America's first serial killer, who apparently was also a fake story.
I must say Miles Mathis has quite a collection of written works, and many of them I find fascinating. While I appreciate his detail and research, I can't say that I fully agree with all things that he says, his view on serial killers for one, I definitely do not agree with. Lincoln, I probably agree 90%, and mostly (in part) his mass shooting assessments. Bear in mind that I am in no way disagreeing with you or want to argue this point. Truth be told, I've actually not come across anyone who has read any of his work and have always wanted to just talk this out. That being said, I just can't wrap my head around the fact that most serial killers are fake stories. Doesn't make sense. That's too much down a conspiracy rabbit hole that I just don't think deserves the time. People are crazy and they do unquestionably crazy things. It's that simple. Often times reality is far less complicated than we make it up to be--however that isn't to say that there aren't some complicated measures behind the Ripper, or anything for that matter. Whether he was, in fact, royalty, or paying someone to publish his stories, we will likely never know. The only constant we have is the action and its reaction. People kill, and people who like it, they tend to kill often. Whoever the Ripper was, he had his issues. It wasn't just a passion project, he was clearly working something out, which is why I slide back to the author / poet that had mother issues (which is usually another huge red flag) and wrote hateful disgusting things about women, prostitutes....etc. He legitimately had a reason to focus on prostitutes specifically, which was the MO. He, above all, makes sense. Of course, the left field wouldn't be the left field, nor would a curveball not have its meaning if things always worked out according to what we considered normalcy. There's always that "what if" factor that is so intriguing. In this case, I think he was a killer, and the mystery is on until we figure out who he was, not what he wasn't.
 
OP
Qmeta

Qmeta

Active member
Messages
76
Reactions
141
It wasn't just a passion project, he was clearly working something out, which is why I slide back to the author / poet that had mother issues (which is usually another huge red flag) and wrote hateful disgusting things about women, prostitutes....etc. He legitimately had a reason to focus on prostitutes specifically, which was the MO. He, above all, makes sense.
The person would probably need to be a high-functioning psychopath. Someone with mother issues alone probably wouldn't do these types of things, I think. Murdering one person is one thing, but mutilating them (and using dogs in the process) is an other.

As I think you've surmised, Vincent fits the high-functioning psychopath profile. He wrote to his family that he had periods where he didn't remember anything he did, and the things he thought he was only imagined turned out to be real.

Most of the 'Ripper' letters are fakes, though. I think there were about 800+ received, of which about 150-250 have been 'authenticated', with whatever method they used.
there is also evidence that Jack the Ripper was a story invented by a journalist who was paid to come up with crime stories for newspapers.
Can you provide the best example of this evidence? It is interesting.
 
Last edited:

Magnetic

Well-known member
Messages
123
Reactions
411
The person would probably need to be a high-functioning psychopath. Someone with mother issues alone probably wouldn't do these types of things, I think. Murdering one person is one thing, but mutilating them (and using dogs in the process) is an other.

As I think you've surmised, Vincent fits the high-functioning psychopath profile. He wrote to his family that he had periods where he didn't remember anything he did, and the things he thought he was only imagined turned out to be real.

Most of the 'Ripper' letters are fakes, though. I think there were about 800+ received, of which about 150-250 have been 'authenticated', with whatever method they used.
Post automatically merged:


Can you provide the best example of this evidence? It is interesting.
It's funny that I am reading Vincent's letters to his brother now! His violence and madness is touched upon but no mention is made of London at all. It's almost like the producer of the book of letters wanted to leave out facts and locations. Low level psychopaths get caught but high functioning ones get to be politicians, generals, doctors, and apparently artists. That's a lot of coincidence's you have exhumed, and the cut off ear takes the cake along with his father's murder after he arrived home. I believe that was left out of the book of letters altogether.
 

Dale Larner

New member
Messages
1
Reactions
0
Some lite entertainment for those interested in 'Jack the Ripper'. I've looked into it and found that a 'crazy conspiracy theory' from a few years ago about Vincent van Gogh being 'Jack the Ripper' has some validity.

What's interesting is how most people don't seem to think it is possible because he was 'busy' working on paintings (his painting style wasn't complicated) and lived in France (he lived about 24 hours away, and Jack the Ripper struck sporadically and only on weekends)

Again, don't take it too seriously. I know how some people can get about stuff like this.

A little back story.

On March 23, 1885, Vincent van Gogh's father, a pastor of a church, was found dead on the doorstep of their house right after Vincent's arrival. Vincent had a short temper and would often argue with his father about his inability to do something with his life. Vincent also threatened to kill him. (And later, he would attack Paul Gaugin with a razor before he cut off his own earlobe, supposedly.)

Three months later, Vincent wrote to his brother, "I had just such a longing to be something like a grass-mower," or hanneke maaier in his original Dutch text. 'Maaier' means 'a reaper'. It is interesting to note that 'hanneke' is the diminutive form of the Dutch name 'Hanne', which is feminine. The masculine variant is 'Hahns', or 'John' in English, for which 'Jack' is a common nickname.

So, essentially, a mentally ill man named Vincent van Gogh wanted to be John (Jack), a reaper, three years before 'Jack the Ripper' struck London.

In June, 1888, Vincent began to add reapers to his paintings. That month, he wrote to his brother, "You tell society that it’s squalid because the whore makes us think of meat, of the market. Very good, that, the whore is like meat at the butcher’s."

The first 'Jack the Ripper' murder (from 'the canonical five') was two months later.

It is also interesting that faces (and a body) can be found in his paintings around the time of Jack the Ripper (1888). Here is a sample:

View attachment 16577

View attachment 16564

Vincent mentions Whitechapel seven times in his letters to his brother. He had not only lived in that part of London previously but was familiar with the backalleyways of Whitechapel, as well as its prostitutes and opium dens.

Jack the Ripper's famous 'Dear Boss' letter threatened to cut off a lady’s ears in September of that year, with some victims having had their ears cut off. When he cut off his own earlobe three months later, he mailed it to a woman working in a brothel in Arles. (He visited prostitutes frequently.)

Vincent cut his ear on the night of December 23 and was admitted to the hospital the next morning. The numerous 'Jack the Ripper' letters sent to the police and media — 157 in just a few months — also stopped on the 23rd and resumed the day after he was released from the hospital, sixteen days later. (He would need a day to travel up to London after his release.) Before that, the longest stretch of time without a 'Jack the Ripper' letter had been only five days.

I've added some other details for this info here

Again, something to amuse and entertain :)
When you post someone else's research, it's typical to include a reference to them--otherwise someone might believe you did all the hard work. Also, you did a bad job of getting the info correct.

Dale Larner, author of Vincent Alias Jack.
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,107
Reactions
3,244
When you post someone else's research, it's typical to include a reference to them--otherwise someone might believe you did all the hard work. Also, you did a bad job of getting the info correct.

Dale Larner, author of Vincent Alias Jack.
Yes, a link is usually helpful but he did say it was "found" information. Tact is always appreciated.
 

anotherlayer

Well-known member
Messages
530
Reactions
1,769
Oh, spicy new uyser
When you post someone else's research, it's typical to include a reference to them--otherwise someone might believe you did all the hard work. Also, you did a bad job of getting the info correct.

Dale Larner, author of Vincent Alias Jack.
Great first post! We're a little lenient here and we are all terribly smart, enjoy the company. I enjoyed this OP. A+++ Would read from OP'r again.
 

redtrx

New member
Messages
7
Reactions
15
What if "Jack the Ripper" is the same entity as "Spring-heeled Jack", the fabled phantom that haunted London for decades prior, with the last Spring-heeled Jack event being in the late 1870s, just 10 years prior to the Jack the Ripper murders/mutilations. Some facts (not the best resource I admit): 27 Facts About Spring-Heeled Jack, The Killer Who Could Be A Human Or Could Be A Creature

What is interesting to me is how close the Ripper case, and Spring-Heeled Jack is to modern day reports of 'alien' activity, how the victims particularly in Ripper cases feature the surgical precision found in modern day cattle mutilations (well I'd need to examine this more to confirm this, admittedly), and how both Jacks share the status of being phantom-like, reminding me of reported encounters with 'humanoids' like dogmen or the skinwalkers of American Indian lore. Is this all the same thing, or a group of intelligent agents who have similar capabilities?

Don't know how this would tie into the idea that Vincent van Gogh was JTR, but I just thought it was a curious link I found when looking into JTR.
 
Top