USA: 1850-1915 Expositions, Exhibitions, Centennials, Jubilees, etc

AnthroposRex

Active member
Messages
105
Reactions
203
This reminds me of your quote from this thread @AnthroposRex

Potential etheric energy device?

"These may be devices that use the same principles but tuned to a stepped down frequency that is then used by devices for power.
Maybe a radio station is also a power station if you have the proper receiver?

Or possibly its only for local power receiving. Say, 100 feet, from a generator outside.

It's really interesting to me.
I wonder how the current flows and whether it is doing the Tesla circular magnetic field thing or whether it is one big line designed to just catch waves."

Illumination BY wireless telegraph. Doesn't have a brand name like deforest. Maybe this is something they actually knew how to do!
Dang, you may be on to something. (or I was? 😁)
When a Tesla coil is active it will excite the gas in any fluorescent bulb within its range.

Something within the same principle could make sense. But the tower shape is wrong for that specific example.
 

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
797
Reactions
2,155
De Forest Wireless Telegraphy Tower: Bulletin #1 (1904)

At the 1904 World's Fair in Saint Louis, Missouri, American DeForest President Abraham White organized a sweeping and impressive promotion, in order to establish American DeForest as the preeminent radio company in the United States, while at the same time selling lots and lots of stock of dubious value. White would achieve both goals.

Included as part of the company promotion was this four-page bulletin, showcasing the company's radio tower, which had been set up on the Louisiana Purchase Exposition fairgrounds. (The observation tower had originally been built in 1893 at Niagara Falls. However, because ice from the tower kept falling on an adjacent glass-roofed museum, it was declared a nuisance and ordered to be torn down by December 31, 1903. Abraham White purchased the dismantled tower, and had it moved to the Saint Louis fair.) This publication's purple prose -- the bulletin was printed in purple ink -- included statements such as: "It is safe to say that within a year the revenue accruing to the American DeForest Company from this source alone will surprise the most enthusiastic stockholder." However, the surprise awaiting enthusiastic individuals unfortunate enough to have bought American DeForest stock, would be how little revenue the company actually would take in over the next few years from ongoing operations. And notably omitted from this overview of the company's future were its stock fraud and patent infringement lawsuits, and eventual bankruptcy.
 

Recognition

Active member
Messages
92
Reactions
243

codis

Well-known member
Messages
143
Reactions
323
Let me throw a wrench in:

Radio waves must be generated somewhere, i.e. the sender must consume energy generated (converted) by other means.
Longwave and medium wave transmitters (LW, MW) had up to several hundred kilowatts, even in the early days.
People in the vicinity just hung out long wires to power their electric lightings. It was free energy for them only.

The second problem are the health issues. High EM field intensities are known to cause severe issues at least midterm. Cancer and leukemia rates are significantly inreased in the vicinity of high-power transmitters.
And in many countries, the millitary has to deal with law suits of their former radar service men, which suffered extreme cancer rates.
Everyone here probably knows EEG and ECG. These are methods to measure states of the body via detecting electrical currents in the human body. Which implies that electrical processes are fundamentally to life.
Assuming EM fields several orders of magnitude stronger then those naturally occuring in your body will be detrimental is more then vindicated.
 

Recognition

Active member
Messages
92
Reactions
243
These are two different towers though, right? The wired Deforest one was for Louisiana's expo, and KD's picture of the more solid looking illuminated tower was in Buffalo, right?
Post automatically merged:

Let me throw a wrench in:

Radio waves must be generated somewhere, i.e. the sender must consume energy generated (converted) by other means.
Longwave and medium wave transmitters (LW, MW) had up to several hundred kilowatts, even in the early days.
People in the vicinity just hung out long wires to power their electric lightings. It was free energy for them only.

The second problem are the health issues. High EM field intensities are known to cause severe issues at least midterm. Cancer and leukemia rates are significantly inreased in the vicinity of high-power transmitters.
And in many countries, the millitary has to deal with law suits of their former radar service men, which suffered extreme cancer rates.
Everyone here probably knows EEG and ECG. These are methods to measure states of the body via detecting electrical currents in the human body. Which implies that electrical processes are fundamentally to life.
Assuming EM fields several orders of magnitude stronger then those naturally occuring in your body will be detrimental is more then vindicated.
Hey @codis very interesting facts, thank you! What are your thoughts on the modern day harvesting of radio waves that I linked above? KD if you'd like us to move this convo to a diff thread, please let us know:)
 
Last edited:

codis

Well-known member
Messages
143
Reactions
323
These are two different towers though, right? The wired Deforest one was for Louisiana's expo, and KD's picture of the more solid looking illuminated tower was in Buffalo, right?
Post automatically merged:



Hey @codis very interesting facts, thank you! What are your thoughts on the modern day harvesting of radio waves that I linked above? KD if you'd like us to move this convo to a diff thread, please let us know:)
I know of energy harvesting mainly in the context of low-power sensors. It eases maintenance (no supply cables, no batteries), and extends the areas of application.

To the linked article:
"It is the nature of broadcast transmissions that, when you broadcast, only some of the energy is received and used. The energy that is not received goes to waste. It's only nanowatts of energy, but the energy is everywhere," said Lord Drayson.
What he didn't say - it also creates costs for the operator of the transmitter. And those have a natural tendency to reduce costs. The number of high power transmitters in operation seems to drop for years now, mainly tax-financed "legacy radio" stations are still operated that way.
All modern broadcast "services" changed over to a network of meshed low-power transmitters. Not only for power operating cost, but also for legal reasons (EMI, mentioned health issues).

"What we're doing is using that fact to power very small low-energy devices. The radio frequency transmissions come from wireless networks, and as our hunger for information goes up, the amount of data that we want to transmit is going up exponentially (my emphasis), and therefore this is growing all the time."
He should have said that energy density (field strength) also drops exponentially with distance from the antenna.
I personally would not want to live in an area where you could power your house from environmental EMF. But this is my opinion.
 

anotherlayer

Well-known member
Messages
682
Reactions
2,345
Whelp the insane asylum wasn't as interesting to me as the Buffalo Historical Society was to me! As anotherlayer says in his Pan Am thread, this building was reportedly built for the expo, and is made of marble, stone, etc. and is still standing. Here are a couple google earth shots of the front. Is that mud on the bottom i see? I def don't believe that this jist happened to be the only one built to last. Like my earlier post about the san francisco expo's palace of fine arts, this reminds me of chicago's expo's museum of science and industry. In each case there just happens to be a huge gorgeous stone structure that is left over or 'reinforced' or 'rebuilt'. 😂

I hate to be that guy again but... there is absolutely nothing fantastic about this building. It is a cheap replication. When you see it in person (see my photos here), you find it's just a wannabe. And of course, we have solid evidence that shows this was built in 1901, but I give you the Wiki, because it's another Architect who is suspicious as usual.

The building that houses the Buffalo History Museum was constructed in 1901 as the New York State pavilion for that year's Pan-American Exposition, and is the sole surviving permanent structure from the exposition. As planned, the Buffalo Historical Society moved into the building after the exposition.

Designed by Buffalo architect George Cary (1859–1945), its south portico is meant to evoke the Parthenon in Athens. The building was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987.[2][4]
 

AnthroposRex

Active member
Messages
105
Reactions
203
This is slightly off topic, but this reminds me of the alarm at my old house.
It connected to the alarm company not through my router, but by using the electrical circuit in my house to turn the house into a router, basically.
Anyone else aware that their house is potentially an internet of things device and you wouldn't know unless you saw a little plug in a socket in your house.
Anyway, it made me think that perhaps there is a multi function thing going on with these devices from the past as well.
The power circuit internet thing is only a small step away from telegraph/power line having mostly to do with power, and not design limitations.
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,569
Reactions
5,055
It was held a year after Tennessee’s 100th anniversary of joining the union in 1796.
I was aware of the Tennessee inclusion date but, if you want to do a centennial celebration, you have 100 years to plan the thing so having it a year late seems like an afterthought. Just seemed odd to me to call it a "centennial" celebration when, clearly, it wasn't a centennial of anything (that we know of).
 

Glumlit

Well-known member
Messages
90
Reactions
368
I was aware of the Tennessee inclusion date but, if you want to do a centennial celebration, you have 100 years to plan the thing so having it a year late seems like an afterthought. Just seemed odd to me to call it a "centennial" celebration when, clearly, it wasn't a centennial of anything (that we know of).
Similarly, the 1904 fair was to commemorate the 1803 Louisiana Purchase (101 years later), and the 1893 fair was to commemorate Columbus's whatever in 1492 (401 years later).
 

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,569
Reactions
5,055
Sounds like a few of the "centennials" were afterthoughts.
 

anotherlayer

Well-known member
Messages
682
Reactions
2,345
Here's a good one that has just surfaced of the Buffalo 1901:

planks.jpg

Caption attached: 1901 BUFFALO Pan American Exposition: marching band. Note the plank walkways. The original asphalt contractor did a miserable job and the walkways were quickly chewed up, necessitating planking and piles of rubble throughout the expo. Fingy Conners at the time owned the Vulcan Asphalt Co. and had contracts for paving some city streets, but I haven't as yet found any reference to who exactly did the paving work at the Pan.​
 

WarningGuy

Well-known member
Messages
144
Reactions
369
Wanted to share this image I found as I was working on the Tennessee chapter. It is a "birds eye" of the 1897 Exhibition. I had never really had a lot of great angles of the whole fair in the photos, but this image also makes the fair spectacular. Of course "the parthenon" is front and center for it.

1280px-Tennessee_Centennial_Exposition_1897_(LOC_ppmsca.03354).jpg
Why do we only have a drawing of this and not a photo? Also the perimeter fence is nice and high to keep and the non payers out i suppose and it looks a bit like the shape of a starfort.
 

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
416
Reactions
1,319
Why do we only have a drawing of this and not a photo? Also the perimeter fence is nice and high to keep and the non payers out i suppose and it looks a bit like the shape of a starfort.
A drawing would make it easier to fake what they wanted people to beleive it to looked like, rather than show what it actially looled like in a photograph (or to have to edit in dark room)
 
Last edited:

Recognition

Active member
Messages
92
Reactions
243
To me, it is quite clear that these were structures of the old civilization, that were covered in plaster/white paint. If you watch the videos of UAP and jon levi, they talk about how the tops of these expo buildings were still stained black from soil/mold, while the more lower levels were all white. I think this photo from the Pan Am buffalo expo shows a stadium that was quite old and moldy. Not some temporary structure that was fresh and new, and least of all plaster! I live in new york and even our summers can be quite wet/cold. Not buying that plaster could last in those conditions.

I was looking at youtube comments on the expos and found these comments made by (to my mind) quite a brilliant person, which beautifully explains how these exquisite, transcendant structures could have been created in such almost identical forms, across the world, through a version of 3d printing.


P.s. Check out the etheric energy antennae along stadium's top edge.
What did someone say about the stadium being not old and moldy😂


IMG_6267.PNGIMG_6268.PNGIMG_6269.PNG
 

anotherlayer

Well-known member
Messages
682
Reactions
2,345
What did someone say about the stadium being not old and moldy😂View attachment 26738View attachment 26739View attachment 26740
It's all old and moldy in Buffalo ;) But to be on point here, are you suggesting that this stadium had been around for 100s of years prior? What does this moldy evidence show us?

I believe this whole place looked like complete shit by November. Our weather is not kind to shoddy construction. I think this mold and filth is just a mix of Buffalo weather and plaster. None of this Pan Am would be inspiring today. Certainly not any more inspiring than DisneyWorld. It's all lipstick on a pig with a canal that goes around and around and around and around, ad nauseum.
 

Top