Triumphal Arches, aka Ianuae Magicae: bridge portals between places, or regular structures?

Plissken

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How about all of the New York Arches. Most of them have been torn down.

VICTORY ARCH 1919
Victory Arch.jpg



This mysterious New York City arch is what used to be called the “Victory Arch”, a temporary monument of wood and plaster built at 24th Street and Fifth Avenue in 1918. It was built to commemorate the New Yorkers who died in WWI. Plans to make the Victory Arch a permanent monument were eventually thwarted due to a group of sculptors who felt it was too vengeful towards the Germans, and even future mayor, Fiorello H. LaGuardia publicly denounced the project as an “Altar of Extravagance.” 🐍Plissken sighs. Shakes head. Also, those are modern tanks, artillery guns, airplanes and other weapons of war on top of the columns in the colonnade and check out all the elaborate streetlights in all of these photos.


Victory-Arch-Madison-Square-Temporary-NYC.jpgVictory.jpgvictory Triumphal Arch.jpgVictory Arch.jpgVictory Arch heading from victory to heroic death.jpgVictory Arch = ARMY Marching Through.jpgVictory 3.jpgVictory Arch = ARMY Marching Through.jpgVictory 3.jpg Victory Arch with Balloons.jpgVictory Arch - Elephants and paper mache.jpgvictory arch 5.jpg


Here's a closeup of the balloons and circles of obelisks
victory-arch closeup of balloons.jpg


The one image with anyone actually building any of these arches-- the standard photo we see here on stolen history -cranes on top finishing up.
Victory 2 - cranes on top construction.jpg


The arch was designed by Thomas Hastings and was modeled after the Arch of Constantine in Rome using temporary materials. Relief panels commemorating such things as important battles and war service organizations covered the $80,000 triple arch before it was eventually razed. (🐍$80,000 to build a temporary building in 1919)

Inscription on one of the pillars of the arch "God give us the privilege of knowing that we did it without counting the cost."
🐍WHAT DID WE DO AND AT WHAT COST?

Here's a Youtube Video showing the victory parade that went through.

The courtyard formed by the columns on each side before the arch on Victory Lane was called the Altar of Victory and the courtyard after the arch was called the Altar of the Dead. So they marched from victory through the gate to the Altar of the Dead!!
Victory Arch heading from victory to heroic death.jpg



The Roman senate has an altar of Victory as well and it bore a Statue of the Goddess of Victory too. She supposedly looked like this but the original Roman statue is lost.

Coin showing Victory in Roman Senate.jpg


They built this arch as part of VICTORY WAY. In addition to the arch, they built two pyramids out of captured German Pickelhuabes helmets. They created Victory Lane to promote the fifth and final Liberty Bond of the war, called a Victory Loan -- these loans paid for withdrawing from Europe and life insurance on 100,000 dead soldiers.
Pyramids of helmuts = Victory Way on Park Avenue, showing two pyramids that were covered in Ge...jpg


Pyramid with obelisk.jpgpyramid nyc.jpgPyramid of helmuts in front of Grand Central Station.jpgPyramid - assembly of.jpg

The last pic of the assembly, was the pyramid already there or did they build just to mount these helmets. I guess this is a thing, found some other pyramids of helmets:

Pyramid of Helmuts Memorial_interrallie_de_Cointe_-_02.jpgPyramid of Helmuts Nazi style.jpgPyramid of WW2 helmets in St Petersburg.JPG

Those are speakerphones hanging down in these pictures. Pioneering Wireless Speech
pyramid with speakerphones.jpg


They believe that the female statues on top of these pyramids are of the Goddess Winged Victory or Nike maybe of Samothrace.

There are also murals along the way. Here's the few images I can find.
murals lining victory way.jpg


murals close up.JPGmural Photograph shows Dr. Joseph Augustus Blake (1864-1937) speaking at the Day of the Wounde...jpgmural  behind Mrs. W.G. AcAdoo, Speaking for Victory Loan.jpg
The Arch of Jewels marked the entrance way to Victory Lane.

Made of temporary plaster and lath, the Arch of Jewels stretched across Fifth Avenue at 60th Street. The two shafts of the Arch of Jewels rose to 80 feet. They were covered with thousands of prisms; when lit up at night by beams cast by several dozen searchlights, the prisms sparkled with the colors of the rainbow.

Arch of Jewels  2.JPG
Arch of jewels - Detail.JPG


Arch of Jewels 1919-1922.jpgArch of Jewel illuminated.jpgArch of jewel.JPGArch of Jewels at night 1930 to 1950.pngArch-of-Jewels.jpgArch of Jewels 1919.jpg

Arch of jewels is also a term used by the Masons, as in Royal Arch Jewels, for some of their baubles, like these but there are a ton:

RAC-1.jpgroyal arch.jpg
And last but not least on victory way from outside the Library:

Pyramid area on victory way -Spears and shields stood in front of the New York Public Library,...jpg


Yes, those are weapons and shields from conquered enemies. The wreaths are for the dead. Nice Eagles perched on top!

Photo of Murals
Parade and monuments
Flatiron and Arch
Victory Arch
Victory Parade
Helmet pyramid in NYC
Helmet pyramid
History of the Piles
Discarded German Helmets
Book about the Parade and monuments
🔸🔸🔸

Madison Square had also been the location of another temporary arch in 1899 called the Dewey Arch, which was built by Charles R. Lamb to commemorate Commodore. George Dewey’s victory over the Spanish at Manila Bay in 1898. The Dewey Arch was built of staff, the same material used for the temporary buildings at the World’s Fairs, and modeled after the Arch of Titus in Rome.
Dewey Arch.jpg

The Dewey Arch was decorated with the works of twenty-eight sculptors and topped by a large quadriga --depicting four horses drawing a ship. The arch was illuminated at night with electric light bulbs. 🐍Three guys photographed by the guy taking this picture and it looks like there are a couple more closer to the arch but not one I could find of the construction of this arch.

Dewey Arch 1.pngDewey Arch and Madison Square.jpgDewey Arch from above.jpgDewey arch parade.jpgDewey Arch.jpgdewey cloudy day.jpgdewey.jpgDewey_Arch_1900_Color.jpg

Another view with obelisk and columns:
Dewey with columns and obelisk.jpg

After the parade on September 30, 1899, the arch began to deteriorate. An attempt to raise money to rebuild it in stone (as had been done for the arch in Washington Square Park) failed, owing to the growing unpopularity of the Philippine War. The arch was demolished in 1900, and the larger sculptures sent to Charleston for an exhibit, after which they were either destroyed or lost. 🐍 Sighs Again.

The Dewey Arch was far showier than the earlier arches: “The great triumphal arch to be erected in this city in honor of the return of Admiral Dewey will not only be worthy of the occasion, but will be the most elaborate and artistic structure of its kind ever attempted here or in Europe.” [NYT]
🐍 they forgot to add temporary into that quote as in "the most elaborate and artistic temporary structure"...

Dewey Arch
Dewey Wiki

🔸🔸🔸


Earlier in 1899, two additional arches were constructed to commemorate the centennial celebration of George Washington’s first inauguration, located on Fifth Avenue — one at 23rd Street at the southern side of the park, and another at 26th Street at the northern side. Made out of wood.

23rd St. Arch, Washington Inaugural Centennial Celebration, New York City, April 29th & 30th, ...jpg26th St. arch 1889 at the northern corner of Fifth Avenue and 26th Street.jpg

These, of course, were accompanied by another arch further down Fifth Avenue at Washington Square Park. That arch, designed by Stanford White, was considerably better received than the Madison Square versions, so much so that White designed a permanent one in 1893. The first thumbnail below is the original one made of wood..

Washington Arch -  U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division parade in New York City WW2.jpg
1889  George Washington Arches.jpgWashington arch and Judson Memorial Tower.jpgWashington square and arch.jpgwashington-square-park-greenwich-village-nyc-Untapped-Cities.jpg

It is based on the Arc de Triomphe.

In 1916, painter John Sloan, dadaist Marcel Duchamp and three of their friends broke into the interior staircase of the arch. They climbed to the top, cooked food, lit Japanese lanterns, fired cap pistols, launched balloons and declared it the independent republic of New Bohemia. The citizens were outraged and the interior door of the arch was sealed.

🔸🔸🔸

Eastern Parkway was designed to be revolutionary, an American Champs-Élysées. By 1866, Eastern Parkway was in the works as the world’s first parkway, meant to mirror the far-stretching, spacious boulevards of Western European cities by urban planners like Georges-Eugène Haussmann of Paris. Olmstead originally designed Grand Army as a humble square meant to physically separate the park from the chaotic city outside its gates. Now, the grand entrance pays homage to American deities like Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy in statue.

The 1892 addition of the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Arch, celebrating the Union victory in the Civil War, adds to the Parisian feel. Designed by John H. Duncan, who also planned Grant’s Tomb, it mirrors the Arc de Triomphe.

The Soldiers' and Sailors' Arch at the Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, New York City, is a triumphal arch dedicated "To the Defenders of the Union, 1861–1865".[2] The eastern end with a stairway to the observation deck and crowning sculpture was occasionally open to the public until the early 2000s, when deterioration of the interior made it unsafe for the public.
Grand Army - The_Soldiers_and_Sailors_Memorial_Arch.jpg

William Tecumseh Sherman was the speaker at the 1889 cornerstone, and President Grover Cleveland led the 1892 unveiling.

Grand_Army_Plaza - Arch in 1894 without sculptures..jpggrand Army Plaza with illuminated pyramid, I mean Christmas tree.jpgGrand-Army-Plaza-Arch-Prospect-Park-Brooklyn-Untapped-Cities.jpg
🔸🔸🔸

It is based on the Arc de Triomphe.

In 1916, painter John Sloan, dadaist Marcel Duchamp and three of their friends broke into the interior staircase of the arch. They climbed to the top, cooked food, lit Japanese lanterns, fired cap pistols, launched balloons and declared it the independent republic of New Bohemia. The citizens were outraged and the interior was closed to the public.

🔸🔸🔸

Manhattan Bridge Entrance Ramp was inspired by the by the triumphal Porte Saint Denis in Paris and is a NYC landmark by the firm Carrère and Hastings, who also designed the New York Public Library. The accompanying colonnade and arch were completed in 1915. The Porte Saint Denis was in turn inspired by the Arch of Titus in Rome.
Manhattan Bridge Entrance.jpg


Manhattan Bridge detail - cornucopia.jpgManhattan Bridge Brooklyn_Plaza_Harry_M._Pettit.jpg
Manhattan Bridge
Bridge Wiki
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The Arch of Constantine also served as the model for the facade of the Municipal Building. The building’s terra-cotta vault was inspired by the Palazzo Farnes and its columned entrance was possibly modeled on Bernini’s Colonnade, at St. Peter’s

FACADE OF THE MUNICIPAL BUILDING.jpg


🔸🔸🔸

Mostly forgotten and graffiti-ridden, the 35-foot high marble Seward-Drake arch is now partially obscured behind buildings in Inwood. The arch is a remnant of a once wealthy family, whose marble estate was once entered via this monumental arch. According to The New York Times, the Drake family built their estate in 1855 on a hilltop north of the Dyckman family, using marble quarried from a location at the foot of the hill along Broadway. A low marble wall extended from the arch, which was said to be an exact replica of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris.

The arch can be seen in this 1903 photograph of the the Sherman Creek Power Plant:
1903 arch with power generating plant.JPG

The house was sold to Thomas Dwyer, a contractor who built the Solder and Sailor’s Monument and part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, who used the arch as his workshop. As the IRT subway made its way, the land was subdivided and at some point, a car dealership used the arch as its entrance. This signaled the end of the once grand Drake mansion, which was demolished in 1938 for the Park Terrace Gardens. The arch caught fire in 1970, leaving the roof open. Here she is today being very victorious:

seaman-drake-arch.jpg
Seward Drake Peek a boo.JPG



🔸🔸🔸

🐍 So we have arches in New York associated with Masons, pyramids, obelisks, altars of death and victory, war trophies, weapons, parades, World Fair building techniques, new technologies (wireless sound), fishy stories, as well as illumination and sound.

I wonder if these arches or gates, build power using sounds from the marching troops and cheering crowds, or maybe using human energy as a battery but like KB, I think some vital part has been removed. I hope everyone noticed that if they did give interior tours in the surviving Arches, they don't anymore. I found one interior photo shot by a NYT blogger on a private tour of the Washington Arch. That's it.

Washington Arch.jpg


Plissken 🐍


🔸🔸🔸
Madison Square Arches all gone
LOC NYC Arch pics
8 Monumental Arches of NYC
 
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Red Bird

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@tupperaware, I think is on to something. Current mind control using AI supposedly works on mapping your pattern of thoughts and replacing them by refiguring your short term memory. Targeted individuals are recommended to act impulsively to mess up the program or mapping. All this and more using EM. The psychos have always seemed to to be trying to get us to forget and then direct and are very successful. CERN is implicated in the Mandela effect (talk about gateways and freaks in control).
The old ‘triumphal’ arches were probably noted, or known, to cause this doorway effect to all the uses noted in other posts plus perhaps some tech we don’t know but the mystery schools (running science, tech and govt) do. Forgetting is important if you want to do a reset.
 

BrokenAgate

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I was going through my many image files, trying to organize them, when I came across this interesting drawing/etching/painting that I nabbed from some other thread on this forum. (Can't remember which one, sorry.) I can't really figure out what is going on in this image. If we really are just looking through an arch, then the horizon line on the right should appear underneath the archway. Instead we see a completely different scene of people in boats, while people in the foreground are walking around on land. The whole structure is brightly illuminated and casting a glow onto the ground in front of it. I don't know who the artist was, or what the writing at the bottom says. What are we seeing? A portal to a different landscape? Can anyone read the writing?


Illuminated arch 18th Century.jpg
 

Searching

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I was going through my many image files, trying to organize them, when I came across this interesting drawing/etching/painting that I nabbed from some other thread on this forum. (Can't remember which one, sorry.) I can't really figure out what is going on in this image. If we really are just looking through an arch, then the horizon line on the right should appear underneath the archway. Instead we see a completely different scene of people in boats, while people in the foreground are walking around on land. The whole structure is brightly illuminated and casting a glow onto the ground in front of it. I don't know who the artist was, or what the writing at the bottom says. What are we seeing? A portal to a different landscape? Can anyone read the writing?


View attachment 19737
The right side is French:
pont sur un rivière navigable el aupres partie d'un edifice
bridge over a navigable river and adjacent to a building
 

PairAlleles

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SuperTrouper

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I apologise if it was shared before, but Secrets in Plain Sight by Scott Onstott (which I highly recommend by the way), discusses the relationship between the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel, Luxor Obelisk, the Arc de Triomphe, and the Grande Arche in Paris. They create the doubling pattern. The Grand Arche, which is a 4D hypercube, points to the birthplace of Isis in Egypt. Have a watch on the discussion of this for about eight mins (from 3:26 to 3:34), it's absolutely mind-boggling:

.​
 

Mabzynn

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What do you think KD?


  • Title: Disegno della seconda macchina rappresentante un luogo di delizia dove colla decorazione di una piacevole bambocciata, si dispone il volo di un pallone aereostatico ... / Guis. Palarzi, arch. inventé ; Franco Barbarza, incise.
  • Date Created/Published: [Italy : s.n., 1785?]
  • Medium: 1 print : engraving.
  • Summary: Print shows a device for creating firework displays. The machine's shape represents a place of delight in which was arranged the flight of an aerostatic balloon. The fireworks are part of the annual homage paid by the King of Naples and Sicily to Pope Pius VI on a feast day for apostles Peter and Paul, June 29, 1785.
  • View the MARC Record for this item.
This could be an excellent source for photographs if you do not know about it...thousands upon thousands of photos...at the
The Library of Congress...

Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscapes Survey: Search Results
of every state in the U.S...architectural drawings and engineering plans are even included for some of them... you can search by City and State. I started with DC of course.

Search Results: "Washington DC" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress)
  • Summary: Print shows a device for creating firework displays. The machine's shape represents a place of delight in which was arranged the flight of an aerostatic balloon. The fireworks are part of the annual homage paid by the King of Naples and Sicily to Pope Pius VI on a feast day for apostles Peter and Paul, June 29, 1785.
New aerostatic machine being 65 feet high, and 120 in circumference, in which M Le Chev. Moret will go up. The 10th of August 1784. To ascend from Five Fields Row, Chelsea, on Tuesday at 1 o'clock. Image taken from A collection of broadsides, cuttings from newspapers, engravings, etc, of various dates, formed by Miss S. S. Banks. Bound in nine volumes. Originally published in 1780?-1810?.
 

JWW427

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Whatever their original function was––be it spiritual, mechanical, technological, symbolic, all of the above, etc.––they were, and still are, a potent symbol of conquest, raw power, victory, and military might. Power amplification for the light...or the dark. As above, so below. A gateway to heaven or hell, so to speak. It's all about perspective. The photo below is iconic, but in a sad way.
A power tool can saw wood for fixing a bridge, or it can be an electrically-powered 20mm Gatling gun.
JWW

German arch 2.jpeg
panzer arch.jpeg
 
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