They tried to make this book disappear: The Last Explorer by Edwin Hoyt

Anonymous

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I wrote in the Multiple Temperate Antarcticas thread about how misdirection is used to distract from the southern continents. Here is a much more jaw-dropping example that I have found.

Admiral Byrd probably needs to introduction on this forum, so I won't go into who he was and what he did. But did you know there was a book written about him? I found it by accident at my local library, because it would not have been easy to find the book through other means.

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The author, Edwin P Hoyt wrote a lot of books, here they are on his Wikipedia page:

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You might have an idea where I am going with this. "The Last Explorer" is not included in his bibliography.

That's a little bit strange, right? It gets stranger.

Edwin Hoyt died in July 29, 2005. Then just WEEKS later, this book was published.

Here is the title

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The similarities between the 2 books are astounding. Both books are about Antarctic explorers who explored using airplanes. Both books even have the same TITLE - "The Last Explorer" And of course, any search for "The Last Explorer" brings up the second book, NOT the first.

This seems to be a clear case of misdirection from the much more interesting explorer Admiral Byrd, to some irrelevant nobody explorer you probably have never heard of.

So what's in the first book? I've checked it out a few times and read bits and pieces, but nothing sticks out. As far as I can tell, he does not talk about Temperate continents but I haven't read every word. I consider this project unfinished until I read the entire thing and take photos of anything I find interesting.
 

KorbenDallas

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Great find.

I think the biggest threat posed by Byrd is his name and the fact that he existed, for both carry some information the establishment wished never existed.

Keep us updated on what you find in the book please.
 

esgee1

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Paracelsus

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Operation Highjump had a seriously impressive mission profile. Even mainstream can't deny that they were going down there loaded for bear for highly vague objectives.
Operation Highjump | History | Air & Space Magazine

I dig this quote:
A&S - "Was Byrd able to accomplish all of his objectives?"
Belanger - "No. Admiral Byrd by then was a minor player. His name was, of course, illustrious, and they wanted to make use of that."

That's the way you do it, that's the way you shill!
 
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KorbenDallas

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Belanger - "No. Admiral Byrd by then was a minor player. His name was, of course, illustrious, and they wanted to make use of that."
That’s because A&S are in the same boat. They could have killed Belanger with follow up questions after a statement like this.
 

KorbenDallas

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I don't know what the initial print run was in 1968, but the remaining 445 library copies, and 16 available on abebooks make this book very rare. eBay has zero copies for sale. Considering that library copies are not really available for purchase, the number of copies for sale appears to be well under 100. That's nothing as far as books go. This is not some Gutenberg Bible after all.

The book is not expensive due to pretty low demand. I purchased a copy on abe; wanna see if there is anything in there.

I have never heard of, or seen this book before, though my interest in the topic has been present for many years now. This in turn suggests that simple interest in the topic of Antarctica, and specifically in the achievements of Admiral Byrd were not sufficient to bump me into this title. Googling with no author produces anything but this book.

Just my opinion obviously.
 
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