The Williamson Tunnels, Liverpool, UK.

Timeshifter

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The Williamson Tunnels: Edge Hill, Liverpool UK.

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I came across this recently whilst looking around for other curiosities in my favourite city, Liverpool on the UK.

It is taught as fact that these were all built to give workers some work, or because Joseph Williamson was eccentric!

After reading briefly, I thought, come one, built for no reason? So I had to look further.

According to waki: Image below: 'The "banqueting hall", which is about 70 feet (21 m) long, between 20 feet (6 m) and 25 feet (8 m) wide and 20 feet (6 m) high'

17721

That is some construction for the sake of it... 10 to 15 metres underground too...

Wiki, the ‘friends of Williamson’ website, and any other source claims that Williamson perhaps built these tunnels as a means to offering employment to the out of work of the Edge Hill area of the city, post the Napoleonic wars, or simply because he was eccentric (They've no idea)

So a self-made millionaire (Tobacco) buys a plot of land, builds some houses on it, then quarries it out and builds tunnels, chambers and banquet halls, just to give the local populous work? For 30 years he built away down there, but no one knows why? Give me a break. Look at the details in the buildings, these were built to be lived in, not simply made for the sake of it and to be filled in.

However, using the ‘not knowing why’ narrative certainly is an easy cover story to use, after all, is who doesn’t love a mystery, and it adds to the appeal of the tunnels.
The official line is no one knows why he did this? They know who he is, what he is worth, the houses he has built, but no one knows why he built these tunnels?

Friends of WT

Waki

Let us look at Joseph Williamson:

The Mole of Edge Hill, or the King of edge Hill, born 1759 and dies 1840. Even his history is a mystery, born in Warrington, oh no, after some more research, actually he was born in Barnsley, Yorkshire (still debated) He had a bit of luck in business and this allowed him to buy a plot of land in Edge Hill, Liverpool. He built some houses and landscaped the land, and for no apparent reason dug miles of tunnels beneath it. After his wife dies he becomes more eccentric. He meets George Stephenson who was building the extension of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway from Edge Hill to Lime Street stations and whose own excavations passed through those of Williamson.

Even his Portrait may not even be him according to the FOW website...

17724

Joseph Williamson?​

That is pretty much it for waki and the FOW website FOW

Joseph Williamson Waki

Further investigation brings up the same info. It seems very little is known about this highly successful and wealthy business man… In fact, it seems without the writings of James Stonehouse, it seems even less would be known about Williamson and the tunnels.

Who was James Stonehouse?

I could find very Little about this guy, other than he was the author of this book 'The streets of Liverpool' book which celebrated the achievements of Williamson. Other than this, the guy is a ghost...

On the Fiends of Williamson website they state about Stonehouse:

'Reading Stonehouse’s writings on the tunnels with the benefit of modern research, it is clear that in a small number of instances he makes factual errors. Equally, a few of his notes appear the subject of slight exaggeration (though this is difficult to prove)'

Fabrication

I am beginning to believe this whole story and its characters are fabricated...

So according to the official narrative, from 1840 after Williamson's death, the 'Tunnels' were filled in and forgotten. Until the early 1900's when some mining surveys were done and produced some maps of part of the site, the and then some military investigations which discovered some tunnels, and then the 'association?' in 1907 produced some incomplete maps due to back fill, then no further investigation of interest until 1995 when a student from Liverpool University carried out a micro-gravity survey of the site. Interesting, why this survey on this site? Link to paper The narrative of this paper places the tunnels firmly 150 years old.

Micro Gravity: Gravimetry is the measurement of the strength of a gravitational field. Gravimetry may be used when either the magnitude of gravitational field or the properties of matter responsible for its creation are of interest. Waki

I also noticed this in a paper written on the tunnels Paper The paper however follows the official narrative mostly .

'Other possible explanations for the ‘tunnels’ construction range from a refuge for an impending apocalypse, contraband warehouses, and as a means of moving unseen through the area. There does not appear to be any evidence for these theories other than Williamson’s reported religious fervour and highly secretive nature'

:unsure: Spidy senses tingling.

Here is a drawing depicting the area in 1550. Have tried to find a source showing the terrain prior, I have not as yet. This artist must have spent so much time up there in their balloon....

17729

Noticed how there was almost no interest in the tunnels for almost a century? Why could that be? Allow the populous to forget about them?

Waki

Some guy called Charles Hand visited the tunnels in the early 1900's and made some amendments to Stonehouse's work, other than this, Hand is another ghost.

Hand

Lets have a look at the history of the tunnels, again there is very little, from the FOW website which manages the tunnels, or waki.

‘The manner in which matters developed from this point on is the subject of much Chinese whispering and even more speculation. A choice has to be made here without the benefit of any significant documentary evidence. Most casual and many serious observers today maintain that Williamson had his men continue digging, building and tunnelling, perhaps making use of the old quarries on the site, as a response to the poverty which surrounded his neighbourhood. Certainly, the construction stepped up a gear and a labyrinth began to take shape, but was it genuinely the product of philanthropy on Williamson’s part?’

I am back where I started. Who in their right mind would build this to give people work, or for giggles? What about the planning, the tools, the skills, the spoil? The FOW website admits Williamson may not even have made any plans!

Below is hand drawn map of the tunnels supposedly drawn by Stonehouse, but again can we believe this guy?

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And here is the most recently proposed map, including know and suspected tunnels.

17723

It seems that more tunnels are regularly being unearthed (surprise) Link Note how these tunnels have names: Banquet Hall, Boiler room, Kitchen.... Tunnels my #rse.

If we look at the terrain around Edge Hill, could it possibly suggest a mud flood? I have driven up there before, and it is certainly on a steep incline with a mound on top of the hill. The train lines and tunnels do appear to be cut into the hill, when it appears it would have been easier to run over ground, but if there are tunnels already there?

Old drawing (Published 1847) and recent google earth screen grab: Again, this artist must have spent so much time up there in their balloon....

17725


Red marks the location of the the tunnels. Link to original

Below, google earth similar view today, you can see the railway cut into the 'mound' and yes there is rock.

17726

I am not buying any of the official narrative.

Could it be, that these (and many more tunnels were already in existence, were discovered and simply dug out, perhaps when laying railways? Further, could Joseph Williamson be another one of these dubious historical fugues, perhaps from the imagination of Stonehouse? Or are they both fabricated figures to sustain the narrative?

Could it be that this labyrinth of buildings have simple been rediscovered, and this Williamson guy has been introduced to the narrative, to cover up the actual origin of the tunnels/ rooms/ chambers?

It is pretty obvious that these are not simply tunnels. But by calling them tunnels, people do not look past that.

What also struck me when seeing these tunnels is their similarity to some other ‘Victorian’ tunnels which I came across near me, which are said to have been built in the same mid-1800s, and serve as storm drains…

Sheffield Megatron:

17727

I have lived in Yorkshire for 47 years and not a single friend or member of my family had heard of these tunnels when I asked. It seems these tunnels have been rediscovered over the last decade by Urban explorers.

Urbex

TS Conclusion:

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand that there is more here than meets the eye. I am not convinced that any of these structures are what they are said to be, I believe they all had a prior use/ function. These Williamson tunnels are certainly not what they are being sold to be.

The next time I visit Liverpool, shall book on a tour and take my own images, I will also ask some awkward questions, I know what the responses will be, but I have to ask :)

Would love to hear your thoughts, and does anyone have experience of similar across the UK or worldwide?

Cheers, TS.
 
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0harris0

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Would love to hear your thoughts, and does anyone have experience of similar across the UK or worldwide?
firstly, awesome post, the official sounds like a bunch of lies!

secondly- I live in Bristol, there are a load of tunnels throughout the city, some caves too, there isnt much information about these though, a few of the older generation (the "lads" of the 70s/80s) remember being able to access the old tunnel/cave systems as kids, though there's a lot of old mines around! any extant entrances are on private property or gated & locked...
The Colston Hall, however, has tunnel entrances in its basement (3 floors down...) but they're always locked.. I wonder who holds the key, they have tunnels from near the old harbour, all the way up to clifton.. (1-1.5 miles)
always been intruiged about those, i may aswell look into it properly now :geek:
 

BStankman

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Verity

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I'm so pleased you've put something together on this subject. I'd love to have done so but... time.
I've been watching them via FB for a year or more now. Occasionally asking questions that the well-meaning staff get flustered/angry over, so I usually keep quiet.
When one goes through the many 'tunnel' and 'underground' stories in modern news articles throughout the world there is a constant angle; they are not tunnels per se, these were originally "quarries" where men went to quarry stone to build buildings up to 5m above ground.
(?)
So... they dig out the stone beneath their feet and carry it above ground to build on top of the dug-out quarry then go back down and dig out more, until what- suddenly there is a building of quarry-stone standing upon a quarry with no more stone in it..?
This idea above is popular in Rome right now- maybe it's the precursor to filling in the 'quarries' as all the buildings are collapsing. As they apparently do, because people haven't stopped widening the quarries..?
Labyrinth of Roman tunnels is mapped as crumble into ancient voids

The Williamson staff use this quarry-idea too when pushed, that they were quarries originally, then bricked over, but these, like the majority of other underground sites are clearly well-constructed tunnels and/or hallways connecting to yet further tunnel systems with multiple floors.

Jury's out on why they were built, but I'm reminded of that film 'Interstellar' when the actors went hopping worlds looking for a decent spot to colonise.
They land on the shallow water planet. It all seems odd, but innocuous enough until a massive tidal wave comes to crush all in its path.
Perhaps the builders knew that every so often sh*t happened, and they were simply prepared, or maybe they needed to quarry stone and bricked the quarries over but ended up getting carried away, or maybe they hadn't thought of umbrellas yet and a series of tunnels was useful on precipitous days. :)

Looking around at Italy and France etc., where folks lived underground during the war, it's not such a huge push to imagine the 15-1600's, when whatever happened was happening perhaps...
A Secret World Hidden Beneath the Vineyards of Champagne

If there was some sort of global cataclysm like (in my own version of events) a series of major volcanic eruptions/earthquakes (inspired by bolts through the Sahara?) which had volcanoes spewing months or even years worth of slow-release ash all over Europe/Russia etc. people would need to have 'safe spaces' to live and work, allow clean water to collect, people to breed etc.
When above ground is purely inhospitable, one goes underground. When thunder bolts scare the cr*p out of you, you run to a cave if there is one.
When bombs fell in WW2 London you go sleep in the Underground. Whatever. One attempts to escape the source of danger.

When asking the official stance on necessary tools and technology of digging out the Williamson stone walls back in the 1700's, there was no answer. When asked about the extraordinarily beautiful architectural design and physical skill involved with the curvature of some of ceilings that were officially constructed by minimum wage workers down on their luck, no answer.

The point of the word architecture, is the technology of the arch.
Which is pretty much perfect, sacred geometry.

So yeah, unskilled labourers created these with 18th century tech. What- spades, pickaxes and wheelbarrows? I guess.. it could..be... done...


177511775217753177541775517756
 

Ice Nine

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I'm not even going to say the intricate curvilinear brickwork is similar, it's identical. Apparentently brick masons, world wide, all went to the same school.
My brains hurts, we have the more primitive underground cities, like in Cappadocia for instance, then we have the extremely sophisticated stylized brickwork underground cities. I think there were numerous "major events" and not all in the same time frame.
I think our current society is built on the remains of previous societies and that this is the norm all across the world.
Totally agree with this.
 

Moriarty

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The Williamson Tunnels: Edge Hill, Liverpool UK.


I came across this recently whilst looking around for other curiosities in my favourite city, Liverpool on the UK.

It is taught as fact that these were all built to give workers some work, or because Joseph Williamson was eccentric!

After reading briefly, I thought, come one, built for no reason? So I had to look further.

According to waki: Image below: 'The "banqueting hall", which is about 70 feet (21 m) long, between 20 feet (6 m) and 25 feet (8 m) wide and 20 feet (6 m) high'


That is some construction for the sake of it... 10 to 15 metres underground too...

Wiki, the ‘friends of Williamson’ website, and any other source claims that Williamson perhaps built these tunnels as a means to offering employment to the out of work of the Edge Hill area of the city, post the Napoleonic wars, or simply because he was eccentric (They've no idea)

So a self-made millionaire (Tobacco) buys a plot of land, builds some houses on it, then quarries it out and builds tunnels, chambers and banquet halls, just to give the local populous work? For 30 years he built away down there, but no one knows why? Give me a break. Look at the details in the buildings, these were built to be lived in, not simply made for the sake of it and to be filled in.

However, using the ‘not knowing why’ narrative certainly is an easy cover story to use, after all, is who doesn’t love a mystery, and it adds to the appeal of the tunnels.
The official line is no one knows why he did this? They know who he is, what he is worth, the houses he has built, but no one knows why he built these tunnels?

Friends of WT

Waki

Let us look at Joseph Williamson:

The Mole of Edge Hill, or the King of edge Hill, born 1759 and dies 1840. Even his history is a mystery, born in Warrington, oh no, after some more research, actually he was born in Barnsley, Yorkshire (still debated) He had a bit of luck in business and this allowed him to buy a plot of land in Edge Hill, Liverpool. He built some houses and landscaped the land, and for no apparent reason dug miles of tunnels beneath it. After his wife dies he becomes more eccentric. He meets George Stephenson who was building the extension of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway from Edge Hill to Lime Street stations and whose own excavations passed through those of Williamson.

Even his Portrait may not even be him according to the FOW website...

View attachment 17724
Joseph Williamson?​

That is pretty much it for waki and the FOW website FOW

Joseph Williamson Waki

Further investigation brings up the same info. It seems very little is known about this highly successful and wealthy business man… In fact, it seems without the writings of James Stonehouse, it seems even less would be known about Williamson and the tunnels.

Who was James Stonehouse?

I could find very Little about this guy, other than he was the author of this book 'The streets of Liverpool' book which celebrated the achievements of Williamson. Other than this, the guy is a ghost...

On the Fiends of Williamson website they state about Stonehouse:

'Reading Stonehouse’s writings on the tunnels with the benefit of modern research, it is clear that in a small number of instances he makes factual errors. Equally, a few of his notes appear the subject of slight exaggeration (though this is difficult to prove)'

Fabrication

I am beginning to believe this whole story and its characters are fabricated...

So according to the official narrative, from 1840 after Williamson's death, the 'Tunnels' were filled in and forgotten. Until the early 1900's when some mining surveys were done and produced some maps of part of the site, the and then some military investigations which discovered some tunnels, and then the 'association?' in 1907 produced some incomplete maps due to back fill, then no further investigation of interest until 1995 when a student from Liverpool University carried out a micro-gravity survey of the site. Interesting, why this survey on this site? Link to paper The narrative of this paper places the tunnels firmly 150 years old.

Micro Gravity: Gravimetry is the measurement of the strength of a gravitational field. Gravimetry may be used when either the magnitude of gravitational field or the properties of matter responsible for its creation are of interest. Waki

I also noticed this in a paper written on the tunnels Paper The paper however follows the official narrative mostly .

'Other possible explanations for the ‘tunnels’ construction range from a refuge for an impending apocalypse, contraband warehouses, and as a means of moving unseen through the area. There does not appear to be any evidence for these theories other than Williamson’s reported religious fervour and highly secretive nature'

:unsure: Spidy senses tingling.

Here is a drawing depicting the area in 1550. Have tried to find a source showing the terrain prior, I have not as yet. This artist must have spent so much time up there in their balloon....


Noticed how there was almost no interest in the tunnels for almost a century? Why could that be? Allow the populous to forget about them?

Waki

Some guy called Charles Hand visited the tunnels in the early 1900's and made some amendments to Stonehouse's work, other than this, Hand is another ghost.

Hand

Lets have a look at the history of the tunnels, again there is very little, from the FOW website which manages the tunnels, or waki.

‘The manner in which matters developed from this point on is the subject of much Chinese whispering and even more speculation. A choice has to be made here without the benefit of any significant documentary evidence. Most casual and many serious observers today maintain that Williamson had his men continue digging, building and tunnelling, perhaps making use of the old quarries on the site, as a response to the poverty which surrounded his neighbourhood. Certainly, the construction stepped up a gear and a labyrinth began to take shape, but was it genuinely the product of philanthropy on Williamson’s part?’

I am back where I started. Who in their right mind would build this to give people work, or for giggles? What about the planning, the tools, the skills, the spoil? The FOW website admits Williamson may not even have made any plans!

Below is hand drawn map of the tunnels supposedly drawn by Stonehouse, but again can we believe this guy?



And here is the most recently proposed map, including know and suspected tunnels.


It seems that more tunnels are regularly being unearthed (surprise) Link Note how these tunnels have names: Banquet Hall, Boiler room, Kitchen.... Tunnels my #rse.

If we look at the terrain around Edge Hill, could it possibly suggest a mud flood? I have driven up there before, and it is certainly on a steep incline with a mound on top of the hill. The train lines and tunnels do appear to be cut into the hill, when it appears it would have been easier to run over ground, but if there are tunnels already there?

Old drawing (Published 1847) and recent google earth screen grab: Again, this artist must have spent so much time up there in their balloon....

Red marks the location of the the tunnels. Link to original

Below, google earth similar view today, you can see the railway cut into the 'mound' and yes there is rock.


I am not buying any of the official narrative.

Could it be, that these (and many more tunnels were already in existence, were discovered and simply dug out, perhaps when laying railways? Further, could Joseph Williamson be another one of these dubious historical fugues, perhaps from the imagination of Stonehouse? Or are they both fabricated figures to sustain the narrative?

Could it be that this labyrinth of buildings have simple been rediscovered, and this Williamson guy has been introduced to the narrative, to cover up the actual origin of the tunnels/ rooms/ chambers?

It is pretty obvious that these are not simply tunnels. But by calling them tunnels, people do not look past that.

What also struck me when seeing these tunnels is their similarity to some other ‘Victorian’ tunnels which I came across near me, which are said to have been built in the same mid-1800s, and serve as storm drains…

Sheffield Megatron:


I have lived in Yorkshire for 47 years and not a single friend or member of my family had heard of these tunnels when I asked. It seems these tunnels have been rediscovered over the last decade by Urban explorers.

Urbex

TS Conclusion:

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to understand that there is more here than meets the eye. I am not convinced that any of these structures are what they are said to be, I believe they all had a prior use/ function. These Williamson tunnels are certainly not what they are being sold to be.

The next time I visit Liverpool, shall book on a tour and take my own images, I will also ask some awkward questions, I know what the responses will be, but I have to ask :)

Would love to hear your thoughts, and does anyone have experience of similar across the UK or worldwide?

Cheers, TS.
Great post. There are also some similar chambers or tunnels under Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral. Which has in itself a very strange history.

Vaults of the Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral crypt under construction, 1937, Liverpool museums

The dating of thec1930s for the above link seems way out too
 

wild heretic

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I'm so pleased you've put something together on this subject. I'd love to have done so but... time.
I've been watching them via FB for a year or more now. Occasionally asking questions that the well-meaning staff get flustered/angry over, so I usually keep quiet.
When one goes through the many 'tunnel' and 'underground' stories in modern news articles throughout the world there is a constant angle; they are not tunnels per se, these were originally "quarries" where men went to quarry stone to build buildings up to 5m above ground.
(?)
So... they dig out the stone beneath their feet and carry it above ground to build on top of the dug-out quarry then go back down and dig out more, until what- suddenly there is a building of quarry-stone standing upon a quarry with no more stone in it..?
This idea above is popular in Rome right now- maybe it's the precursor to filling in the 'quarries' as all the buildings are collapsing. As they apparently do, because people haven't stopped widening the quarries..?
Labyrinth of Roman tunnels is mapped as crumble into ancient voids

The Williamson staff use this quarry-idea too when pushed, that they were quarries originally, then bricked over, but these, like the majority of other underground sites are clearly well-constructed tunnels and/or hallways connecting to yet further tunnel systems with multiple floors.

Jury's out on why they were built, but I'm reminded of that film 'Interstellar' when the actors went hopping worlds looking for a decent spot to colonise.
They land on the shallow water planet. It all seems odd, but innocuous enough until a massive tidal wave comes to crush all in its path.
Perhaps the builders knew that every so often sh*t happened, and they were simply prepared, or maybe they needed to quarry stone and bricked the quarries over but ended up getting carried away, or maybe they hadn't thought of umbrellas yet and a series of tunnels was useful on precipitous days. :)

Looking around at Italy and France etc., where folks lived underground during the war, it's not such a huge push to imagine the 15-1600's, when whatever happened was happening perhaps...
A Secret World Hidden Beneath the Vineyards of Champagne

If there was some sort of global cataclysm like (in my own version of events) a series of major volcanic eruptions/earthquakes (inspired by bolts through the Sahara?) which had volcanoes spewing months or even years worth of slow-release ash all over Europe/Russia etc. people would need to have 'safe spaces' to live and work, allow clean water to collect, people to breed etc.
When above ground is purely inhospitable, one goes underground. When thunder bolts scare the cr*p out of you, you run to a cave if there is one.
When bombs fell in WW2 London you go sleep in the Underground. Whatever. One attempts to escape the source of danger.

When asking the official stance on necessary tools and technology of digging out the Williamson stone walls back in the 1700's, there was no answer. When asked about the extraordinarily beautiful architectural design and physical skill involved with the curvature of some of ceilings that were officially constructed by minimum wage workers down on their luck, no answer.

The point of the word architecture, is the technology of the arch.
Which is pretty much perfect, sacred geometry.

So yeah, unskilled labourers created these with 18th century tech. What- spades, pickaxes and wheelbarrows? I guess.. it could..be... done...


View attachment 17751View attachment 17752View attachment 17753View attachment 17754View attachment 17755View attachment 17756
The first set of pictures reminded me of Ancient Rome. Now those pictures above definitely reminds me of the same.

At first I thought it was brickwork put on to bedrock. But no, the smooth walls are plaster. You can see it very clearly in a couple of pictures. You can also see the trowel marks of the plasterer. There is even a spiral finish to the left on the first photo. They are quite big, broad strokes in places too. The bricks also look quite large in places. Bigger people? The plaster has been shook off the archways at the top (earthquakes?) which I think is the rock dust sediment we are seeing piled up on the floor. But there is more sediment than what comes from the plaster so I think a deluge of some kind, aka mud flood event.

Ancient Rome is built from red bricks too and is also plastered, albeit nicer I think with marble-looking veneers. Like these "tunnels", ancient Rome is on average 10 meters below the ground.

I'd put both tunnels and city around the late middle ages.

The last question is the purpose of these "tunnels". Is it a city that had suffered a cataclysm? What are those massive ceilings for? Is it an aqueduct or sewer system? Could be a possible water storage and transport style building which at the time was mostly above ground perhaps. I'd need to see a lot more pictures.

Looking at more pictures in google images I definitely think this was an old sewage/water works system for the "previous" city if you know what I mean.


Here is one for Moscow. All cities have them it seems.


Tunnels under psychiatric hospitals is an odd one.
Underworld - Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital | Scott Haefner Photography

I mean look at this photo. This screams waterworks if nothing else.
https://www.stolenhistory.org/attachments/wil2-jpg.17752/

There is a maintenance part on the top left and it is such a deep channel because that was full of fresh water which supplied the city.

Same square entrances here as under the psychiatric hospital.


Hospital
Eye of the Beholder - Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital | Scott Haefner Photography

I'm thinking waterworks for sure.

London's sewer




So the next question about the old Liverpool sewage works was when was it really built? Is it early Victorian and Liverpool suffered a mid 19th century mud flood, or is it much earlier than that?

I'll let you guys find out. It would have to be pretty catastrophic for the records of it and the above ground buildings to vanish.


This illustration is 1858 so it is before then.

Excavation of the foundations of over ground buildings.


My word. Read the description: "On the right of this photograph is the newly uncovered cobbled roadway with a slab-covered trench running alongside it. Both the roadway and the trench have been bisected by the later sewer trench which runs diagonally across the photo. "

I wonder what the slab-covered trench could have been used for... No prizes for the obvious there. It was a water run-off drain. That's all it was.



Look at that. Part of the wall has collapsed.
http://www.williamsontunnels.co.uk/Photos/archaeo04.jpg

All photos found here.
New Excavations at the Williamson Tunnels

Yep, Only the foundations of buildings left. Everything else covered in earth, just like all "old " stuff. I'm betting on late middle ages. One of the main earth expansion event events. Which one I don't know.
 
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Verity

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Could be a possible water storage
I suggested water storage having noted the tide mark, and was told that it was the 'tide mark of the spoil' (dirt and broken junk the volunteers haul out bucket by bucket). Could be.

At first I thought it was brickwork put on to bedrock. But no, the smooth walls are plaster. You can see it very clearly in a couple of pictures. You can also see the trowel marks of the plasterer.
Never thought of this being plaster but it'd make sense to be sealed esp. if it was used for water storage. They also said water currently seeps through the plaster/bedrock and has been tested. It is extremely pure.
If you're on facebook you could suggest your ideas to the authoritahs. Everyone is very respectful but I'm not the only one questioning the narrative.

https://www.facebook.com/Friends-of-Williamsons-Tunnels-204751736221882

They also have a website where you can comment.

www.williamsontunnels.com


Have a closer look at the Paddington section. It's just fascinating.
Gallery
The Subterranean Mystery of the Williamson Tunnels

There are literally years worth of photos on their FB page, including 'Williamson's Kitchen' which is below ground level but above the tunnels. They uncovered four cast iron stoves/ovens in a row, quite interesting in itself. Last I heard they were trying to strategically cut the concrete that had been poured down the chimneys.
 
OP
Timeshifter

Timeshifter

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This place is more like a subterranean town or city. I wonder how far into the city it really extends?

All of this this dug out and built in 30 years? Dug out maybe, but built? I believe it is more likely that it was already there for some time prior to Williamson, if he even existed...

Windows? Ventilation? I believe this was a working subterranean society, in our not so distant past.

17854
 

Verity

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The scene at exactly 3:38 could be the tourist attraction in Turin, Italy, I saw the other year. Down a few steps, then down a few more. Bricked up ends and lots of elegant modern lighting so the illusion is very finite.
Absolutely identical spatial style & brickwork. No water though.
So this one in Sheffield is 'Victorian' c.120yrs old, and the one in Italy is 'Ancient Roman', c.2,000yrs old. Hm.
 

KorbenDallas

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What does it look like to you?
Bristole's Center
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In the 1240s the harbour was so busy that it was decided to completely divert the Frome, and St Augustine's Trench, or the "Deep Ditch", was dug from Stone Bridge to join the Avon at Broad Quay.

This has been the line of the river ever since. The Floating Harbour was constructed in 1809, isolating the Avon and Frome from tides between Cumberland Basin and Totterdown Lock.

The increasing use of the Frome as an open sewer combined with the cutting off of the souring action of the tides meant that it was now becoming a health hazard and in 1825 it was again diverted with locks at Stone House, channelling the main flow through Mylne's Culvert to the tidal Avon at New Cut. Up to 1858 the Frome was open along its length, crossed by some 13 bridges.

During the latter half of the 19th century, culvets were built from Wade Street in St Paul's to Stone Bridge, covering this stretch completely: Rupert Street and Fairfax Street run over these culverted sections.

St Augustine's Trench from Stone Bridge to Draw Bridge (near the end of Baldwin Street) was covered over in 1893 and finally the rest of the Trench was covered over in 1938.
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1950s construction of the road bridge to carry Union Street across Fairfax Street
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Union street was a man made slope 500 feet long begun in 1771 from Dolphin street at 42 feet down to broadmead at 7 feet (above the river Frome) the central arch spanned the river with a flood relieving arch on either bank. both sides were gradually lined with 5 storey georgian, regency and victorian shops. The meandering, stinking Frome ranged from 16 to 41 feet wide along its course through the built up city. Its channel was rebuilt to a uniform 22 feet width in 1848 then sections were gradually culverted over along its 1.1 mile length from Wade Street to St Augustines Reach. Fairfax Street was born ontop of the section you see here. The old Union Street river arch of 1771 has been demolished along with swathes of the massive earth embankment and is about to be replaced with the reinforced concrete structure you see today. Later came the frys chocolate factory complex, superceded by the Odeon Cinema. Then came the blitz and 1950s redevelopment, followed by the 1988 Galleries redevelopment and then the mid 2000s redevolment. There is nothing left of Georgian Union Street today. The nearest surviving above ground pre war structures are the lower arcade, friends meeting house, the front of the greyhound, st peters, christ church and st johns on the wall. The 1950s planners really did rape the heart out of the old city. The brutalist planners destroyed so much more than the Luftwaffe ever did.
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I think we need a separate thread on Bristol.

Clifton Rocks Railway, Bristol
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Timeshifter

Timeshifter

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It looks like it was already there and has been dug out from that picture... Spoil heaps all around.

Ready made 'tunnels' everywhere
 

0harris0

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I think we need a separate thread on Bristol.
Go for it, I live here, would be interesting to hear others' opinions on it! Most of the old city centre got annihilated in the 1940s though, and when I was a kid a lot of the centre was dilapidated and in ruins.. all redeveloped now into offices, expensive flats and student halls now tho...

I'm able to explain the locations/narratives to most of the stuff in your post! not all as unusual as it seems...
to me, the only really mad things here are the Avon "New Cut" which is about 3 miles of artificial river, and the suspension bridge :)

Pretty sure that tunnel in the bottom pic is remnants of another railway which ran along the portway.. its taken from next to the river looking across the road to clifton rocks railway (a funicular [water-powered, 45 degree incline] underground railway from the bottom near the river to the very fancy Clifton area)
this is so weird because that channel is supposed to be a river! well, it is a river.. i need to research these photos, locations etc...
 
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