The Vikings attacked Britain in 793 using maps provided by the Pope.

Jim Duyer

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The earliest known Viking attack in the British Isles was the destruction of the Holy Island of Lindisfarne on June 8, 793 AD. I have accumulated a mass of evidence which tells me that Pope Adrian I arranged for the Vikings to have in their possession detailed maps of the locations of all of the important Abbeys and Churches of the Celtic Christians in Britain, in the hope that they would destroy this earliest version of Protestantism. Most Abbeys and Monasteries held the cash funds of the locals in trust, in addition to the accumulated relics of their own. Immediately after this raid on Lindisfarne, the Vikings hit each and every Celtic Christian location in Northumberland, Durham, and all parts nearby, almost as if they had maps to these inland and mostly hidden locations. Would this surprise any of us?

Alcuin, a Northumbrian scholar in Charlemagne's court at the time, wrote:
Never before has such terror appeared in Britain as we have now suffered from a pagan race ... The heathens poured out the blood of saints around the altar, and trampled on the bodies of saints in the temple of God, like dung in the streets.
 

Andromeda

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Were Vikings really a bunch of brutal man slaying pagans? I find it hard to believe and the word Viking was coined for Northerners by the Academic elite somewhere between 18th century-19th century if memory is right..
 
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Jim Duyer

Jim Duyer

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Were Vikings really a bunch of brutal man slaying pagans? I find it hard to believe and the word Viking was coined for Northerners by the Academic elite somewhere between 18th century-19th century if memory is right..
True. Allow me to amend that - A group of Norsemen, made up principally of the residents of modern-day Norway, Denmark and Sweden, and whom many today refer to using the Academic term "Vikings."
 

KorbenDallas

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I have accumulated a mass of evidence which tells me that Pope Adrian I arranged for the Vikings to have in their possession detailed maps of the locations of all of the important Abbeys and Churches of the Celtic Christians in Britain, in the hope that they would destroy this earliest version of Protestantism.
What evidence are we talking about? Any chance of seeing it?
 
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Jim Duyer

Jim Duyer

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What evidence are we talking about? Any chance of seeing it?
I don't mind sharing it but it will take some time to gather it together - it's quite detailed.
I can tell you that the situation was as follows. The Pope needed help in cleaning out the Protestant Celtic-Christians in Britain. He sent missions over to talk to them first, and they basically rejected becoming even more under the domination of the Roman churches than they already were, especially since the Celtic-Christians began at possibly an earlier date than the Roman Church, or if not, very nearly the same time period in the first century AD. Actually the Pope tried to get the Roman Emperor Charlemagne involved, or to use his armies, but Charlemagne was not interested, and was occupied keeping control. Another huge problem was that the Celtic-Christians were operating from an Old and New Testament that was more complete and older than the ones the Romans were using. In some of their prose you will find mention of a scoffing attitude towards the miss-translations of Jerome, and the many words in the Roman version of the bible that actually made no sense at all. Immediately after hitting Lindisfarne, they hit all of the centers of the church in Northumbria and Durham
counties. They headed straight towards them. Even if they tortured one of the Monks, the chances that he would know all of the locations is very low. This effectively spelled the end of the Celtic-Christians, and Roman Catholicism spread soon afterwards. Of course with the arrival of the very staunch French Catholics in the Norman Invasion, that completed the process.
 

irishbalt

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I don't mind sharing it but it will take some time to gather it together - it's quite detailed.
I can tell you that the situation was as follows. The Pope needed help in cleaning out the Protestant Celtic-Christians in Britain. He sent missions over to talk to them first, and they basically rejected becoming even more under the domination of the Roman churches than they already were, especially since the Celtic-Christians began at possibly an earlier date than the Roman Church, or if not, very nearly the same time period in the first century AD. Actually the Pope tried to get the Roman Emperor Charlemagne involved, or to use his armies, but Charlemagne was not interested, and was occupied keeping control. Another huge problem was that the Celtic-Christians were operating from an Old and New Testament that was more complete and older than the ones the Romans were using. In some of their prose you will find mention of a scoffing attitude towards the miss-translations of Jerome, and the many words in the Roman version of the bible that actually made no sense at all. Immediately after hitting Lindisfarne, they hit all of the centers of the church in Northumbria and Durham
counties. They headed straight towards them. Even if they tortured one of the Monks, the chances that he would know all of the locations is very low. This effectively spelled the end of the Celtic-Christians, and Roman Catholicism spread soon afterwards. Of course with the arrival of the very staunch French Catholics in the Norman Invasion, that completed the process.
This is groundbreaking research Jim, can't wait to find out more. Will you publish?
 
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Jim Duyer

Jim Duyer

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I will probably publish this one for free - either here or on my site or both. Right now I am trying as fast as I can to publish "Secrets of the Anglo-Saxons" and also a book about a map that depicts Western Europe, including the trading areas in detail, and is from 2800 BC! Therefore the newest claimant to "the oldest map in the world." I also have proof that the first time someone called the Pope an "antichrist" was not in the fourteenth century, but in the eighth.
 

JWW427

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Given the octopus-like reach of the Vatican throughout "history," it would not surprise me.
Their skullduggery and treachery knows no bounds, no borders.
They were a wealthy corporation in the 8th century too. Bribes were handed out like candy.
By all accounts, the Norsemen were opportunists and savvy traders, and most certainly worked for the highest bidder.
JWW
 
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