The Tesla Turbine

Paracelsus

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Yes, everyone is skeptical of Tesla, but that is not what this post is about. This is about a bladeless pump - which clearly works. I'll link to the best explanations of the working principle of the turbine/pump and schematics.
Nikola Tesla's Revolutionary Engine Still Lies Untouched, Here's How It Works
(PDF) Development Of Tesla Turbine For Green Energy Applications
Tesla Turbine
Study and Design of Bladeless Tesla Turbine

TeslaTurbineOriginal.png

The Tesla turbine works like all conventional pumps, you have an intake and a discharge side, but, this is where the similarities end. Conventional pumps are built around the bladed impeller and spin in a single direction. Tesla concieved of something entirely different, a pump that uses a series of discs that look and act similar to the friction plate on a manual transmission.
How Clutches Work

As fluid is introduced, the central shaft begins to rotate - which the plates are mated to. Due to the principle of the "boundary layer effect" the inherent friction and viscosity of the fluid grabs these plates and causes the pump to increase in speed. As the pump speed increases (measured in rpm's, not discharge volume yet) the efficiency increases. Being a former volunteer firefighter I've spent a decent amount of time around water pumps as a driver operator and engineer. Generally, centrifugal pumps are connected to either a PTO (powered take-off), or have their own engine. Tesla's turbine/pump requires neither, or the requisite priming.

Now this is where the concept gets more interesting. As you add or subtract turbine discs so you increase or decrease pump speed in rpm's (rotations per minute) and pump discharge rate in gpm's (gallons per minute). You could also increase or decrease pump speed or efficiency by increasing the diameter of the turbine discs as well.

Based on the explanations and diagrams, this turbine not only looks feasible, but highly applicable and scalable. Everything I research I research for a singlular purpose - I want to build it. I'll be constructing some water cisterns next year and want to build a Tesla turbine for my inevitable pumping requirements.

If you've made it to here, feel free to weigh in on materials science or over-unity, I'm mostly thinking out loud.
 

whitewave

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Can't wait to see those blueprints/diagrams! I'm one of those heretics that believe Tesla was a real person who really did what he said he did. Then again, he may have had access to forgotten technology and just put it out as his own.

There's a guy in Oklahoma that built (what he claims is) the biggest Tesla coil in the world. Every year he has a pot luck/demonstration in his yard that is awesome to attend/watch. I'm not smart enough to know how to use one to power my washer/dryer but it sure is cool to see one in action. :)
 

Dirigible

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Can't wait to see those blueprints/diagrams! I'm one of those heretics that believe Tesla was a real person who really did what he said he did. Then again, he may have had access to forgotten technology and just put it out as his own.

There's a guy in Oklahoma that built (what he claims is) the biggest Tesla coil in the world. Every year he has a pot luck/demonstration in his yard that is awesome to attend/watch. I'm not smart enough to know how to use one to power my washer/dryer but it sure is cool to see one in action. :)
Any videos or news stories about this?
 
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Paracelsus

Paracelsus

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It's pretty impressive when you're standing 20 feet away and can smell the ozone.
There was always a Tesla coil at the science fair as a little kid. I was probably the last generation where you could actually touch the housing to feel the elctromagnetic energy field. Liability has ruined alot of fun.
 

ISeenItFirst

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Love the idea and the turbine. Sounds like a fun project. You still need a PTO or engine to use it as a pump. I do not understand it's use in an automotive application, unless we are talking about an air powered car. That would be an interesting transmission. Maybe that's what those old companies were using as engines.

Its like most turbines/pumps. Add compressed fluid (air in this case qualifies) and it spins. Spin it and it pumps fluid. Most turbines/pumps are not reversible though(well some are, but typically suffer a large loss of efficiency in reverse). This one has a couple other advantages as well. Crazy efficiency when it gets up to speed. Would love to see what the power graphs would look like. Any design formulas would be cool as well.
There is a video of a little one running on compressed air at the end of the article in the first link. It spins at an impressive 81k rpms. They don't mention psi of air input. That's moving pretty fast.
 
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Paracelsus

Paracelsus

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Love the idea and the turbine. Sounds like a fun project. You still need a PTO or engine to use it as a pump. I do not understand it's use in an automotive application, unless we are talking about an air powered car. That would be an interesting transmission. Maybe that's what those old companies were using as engines.
As an engine it's the torsional energy from the main drive shaft you're looking for, with the fluid input acting as the motive force. Provided the fluid doesn't heat up too much and lose viscosity you could continuously recirculate it in a closed loop. Thus the knock that this is just another "perpetual motion" machine.

As far as needing an auxiliary motor or PTO, you really don't. Provided you get the turbine discs or main shaft spinning it will remain spinning. You could even use an electromagnetic transmission to regulate RPM's. There is a really cool device called a KLAM brake that is used on heavy vehicles. It's a giant electromagnet that slows the rotation of the drive shaft and has different levels of impedance. I've even had the chance to use it while driving water tenders, it's pretty cool.
KLAM Magnetic Retarder System
 

ISeenItFirst

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Its a really cool turbine. As far as needing PTO, you really do. The brake thing is unrelated to this, but regulating rpms isn't the issue, it's transferring power to the wheels.

I do not see any perpetual motion here. Unless you mean to take the exhaust ports and pipe them to the intake port. I have not seen one described that way, and i would bet dollars to donuts it would not function as a forever spinning engine if you did.
 

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