The Temple of the Sun, and the City of Nineveh

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,790
Reactions
19,608

Recognition

Well-known member
Messages
175
Reactions
450
Lol! This is NOT what I pictured when they read us the tale of Jonah and the whale!!! Growing up, pictures like this were displayed in kids books, related to Ninevah:

IMG_7263.JPG

Here are some more pictures that may have been more contemporary to these events: looks like architecture has already reached its peak in 'biblical' times-at least for Ninevah🤔😂

IMG_7262.JPGIMG_7264.JPG

I think the story of Jonah and the whale, and god's destruction of Ninevah are both apropos to this forum.

IMG_7267.JPGIMG_7269.JPGIMG_7270.JPG

Jonah living in a giant fish for 3 days and 3 nights reminds me of this thread: 19th Century Noah's Arks: Whaleback Steamer Ships Did he travel under water, because he would have been bombed if they saw him approach?

Battle of Ninevah occurred on December 12, 627, (so exact😂) but it looks like it could have happened more like 1627, at least according to this painting:

IMG_7268.JPG

"Nineveh, the capital of Assyria, was destroyed in 612 B.C. by the Medes. This was in fulfillment of the prophet Nahum’s prediction that God would completely destroy the city." If Fomenko's dating is correct then the painting would line up with his timeline ideas.

More research to be done, I'll post when I have more time. Great pic KD. Pretty sure Babylon, Diana Ephesus and Ninevah are all linked.
 

JWW427

Well-known member
Messages
284
Reactions
760
The Temple of the Sun in the OP looks like it was part of our Star Civilization. Port hole windows, circular moat, minarets. A health spa of sorts? A hospital with healing waters? Maybe. A solar temple smacks of cosmology worship.
Nineveh has been trampled by ISIS.
The conspiracy word on the street is that ISIS was paid well to destroy evidence of our advanced civilization past.
They tried to destroy the images and statues of the Annunaki Kings and winged chimeras.
This city is a hotspot we should all dig out.
JWW

nineveh.jpegnineveh 2.jpegnineveh 3.jpegnineveh 4.jpegnineveh 5.jpegnineveh 6.jpeg
 
OP
KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
4,790
Reactions
19,608
While the OP only contains one temple, the thread topic was updated to the entire city of Nineveh. Once again abandoned in 612 BC. That is 2,631 years ago.
  • Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul in modern-day northern Iraq. It is located on the eastern bank of the Tigris River, and was the capital of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Today it is a common name for the half of Mosul that lies on the eastern bank of the Tigris.
  • It was the largest city in the world for some fifty years until the year 612 BC when, after a bitter period of civil war in Assyria, it was sacked by a coalition of its former subject peoples, the Babylonians, Medes, Chaldeans, Persians, Scythians and Cimmerians. Its ruins are across the river from the modern-day major city of Mosul, in Iraq's Nineveh Governorate. The two main tells, or mound-ruins, within the walls are Kouyunjik (Kuyuncuk), the Northern Palace, and Tell Nabī Yūnus.
  • Large amounts of Assyrian sculpture and other artifacts have been excavated and are now located in museums around the world. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) occupied the site during the mid-2010s, during which time they bulldozed several of the monuments there and caused considerable damage to the others. Iraqi forces recaptured the area in January 2017
  • Nineveh - Wikipedia
Assyrian royal palace at Nineveh, a reconstruction of Layard, woodcut
Nineveh-city.jpg


The MudFlooded Nineveh
The location of Ninevah was known, to some, continuously through the Middle Ages. Benjamin of Tudela visited it in 1170; Petachiah of Regensburg soon after.
  • Carsten Niebuhr recorded its location during the 1761–67 Danish expedition. Niebuhr wrote afterwards that "I did not learn that I was at so remarkable a spot, till near the river. Then they showed me a village on a great hill, which they call Nunia, and a mosque, in which the prophet Jonah was buried. Another hill in this district is called Kalla Nunia, or the Castle of Nineveh. On that lies a village Koindsjug.
Excavation of Nineveh (dirt on top...)
nineveh_excavation-1.jpg

Source

Excavations of Nineveh
Excavations_of_Nineveh.jpeg

Source

In 1842, the French Consul General at Mosul, Paul-Émile Botta, began to search the vast mounds that lay along the opposite bank of the river. The locals whom he employed in these excavations, to their great surprise, came upon the ruins of a building at the mound of Khorsabad, which, on further exploration, turned out to be the royal palace of Sargon II, in which large numbers of reliefs were found and recorded, though they had been damaged by fire and were mostly too fragile to remove.
  • In 1847 the young British diplomat Austen Henry Layard explored the ruins. Layard did not use modern archaeological methods; his stated goal was "to obtain the largest possible number of well preserved objects of art at the least possible outlay of time and money." In the Kuyunjik mound, Layard rediscovered in 1849 the lost palace of Sennacherib with its 71 rooms and colossal bas-reliefs. He also unearthed the palace and famous library of Ashurbanipal with 22,000 cuneiform clay tablets. Most of Layard's material was sent to the British Museum, but two large pieces were given to Lady Charlotte Guest and eventually found their way to the Metropolitan Museum. The study of the archaeology of Nineveh reveals the wealth and glory of ancient Assyria under kings such as Esarhaddon (681–669 BC) and Ashurbanipal (669–626 BC).
  • The work of exploration was carried on by George Smith, Hormuzd Rassam, and others, and a vast treasury of specimens of Assyria was incrementally exhumed for European museums. Palace after palace was discovered, with their decorations and their sculptured slabs, revealing the life and manners of this ancient people, their arts of war and peace, the forms of their religion, the style of their architecture, and the magnificence of their monarchs.
  • The mound of Kouyunjik was excavated again by the archaeologists of the British Museum, led by Leonard William King, at the beginning of the 20th century. Their efforts concentrated on the site of the Temple of Nabu, the god of writing, where another cuneiform library was supposed to exist. However, no such library was ever found: most likely, it had been destroyed by the activities of later residents.
  • The excavations started again in 1927, under the direction of Campbell Thompson, who had taken part in King's expeditions. Some works were carried out outside Kouyunjik, for instance on the mound of Nebi Yunus, which was the ancient arsenal of Nineveh, or along the outside walls. Here, near the northwestern corner of the walls, beyond the pavement of a later building, the archaeologists found almost 300 fragments of prisms recording the royal annals of Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal, beside a prism of Esarhaddon which was almost perfect.
KD: Just like with everything else, the City of Nineveh had to be dug out from under a whole lot of dirt. Judge for yourself how many feet we are taking about. Certain things never change, and archaeologists keep on ignoring any reasonable explanations related to the arrival of all the mud/dirt. Here are a few excavation photographs.

Photographs
This photo is from the mid-19th century excavation of the colossal statues at the Nergal Gate of the ancient city of Nineveh. This statue was one of two winged bull-men (aka lamassu ) that guarded one of several entrances to Nineveh dated to the time of King Sennacherib*. Named for the Mesopotamian god Nergal, the gate was possibly used for ceremonial purposes since it is the only known gate flanked by stone sculptures of winged bull-men, which were believed to be protective deities.

colossal statues at the Nergal Gate.jpg

Source

Two Statues
nineveh_statues.jpg


A Lamassu sculpture photographed in 1906 at Nimrud, near Nineveh
nimrud_lamassu.jpg

Museum of Lost Objects: The Winged Bull of Nineveh
Ok, I gave up on the photographs. Not my day it is. There are tons of black and white photographs with some serious mudflood-type features. They all belong to various cities from the same area.

nineveh-13.jpg

kd_separator.jpg

P.S. May be... our dug out "Nineveh" is anything but Nineveh. That is if Nineveh had ever existed... but if it did, it could have been at a totally different location. I'm still looking into it.
  • I think we could be presented with the ruins of one of the 17th century cities which TPTB decided to call Nineveh.
 

0harris0

Well-known member
Messages
176
Reactions
370
wow all that homogenous mud... same from top to bottom yet the narrative suggests it's all just natural accumulation of dirt over millenia.... that sure explains just 1 single layer yeah? riiiiiiiiight :rolleyes:
 

knowncitizen

Member
Messages
5
Reactions
11
wow all that homogenous mud... same from top to bottom yet the narrative suggests it's all just natural accumulation of dirt over millenia.... that sure explains just 1 single layer yeah? riiiiiiiiight :rolleyes:
In England you could find an Roman coin/artifact buried just below the surface and then Old Rome is buried under 50 feet of dirt in some places. This never worked in my head! In Ireland we would find stone age stuff at 2 feet depth. Then they try to tell you that some places were buried intentionally. Nothing makes sense. LOL
 

Recognition

Well-known member
Messages
175
Reactions
450
While the OP only contains one temple, the thread topic was updated to the entire city of Nineveh. Once again abandoned in 612 BC. That is 2,631 years ago.
  • Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul in modern-day northern Iraq. It is located on the eastern bank of the Tigris River, and was the capital of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. Today it is a common name for the half of Mosul that lies on the eastern bank of the Tigris.
  • It was the largest city in the world for some fifty years until the year 612 BC when, after a bitter period of civil war in Assyria, it was sacked by a coalition of its former subject peoples, the Babylonians, Medes, Chaldeans, Persians, Scythians and Cimmerians. Its ruins are across the river from the modern-day major city of Mosul, in Iraq's Nineveh Governorate. The two main tells, or mound-ruins, within the walls are Kouyunjik (Kuyuncuk), the Northern Palace, and Tell Nabī Yūnus.
  • Large amounts of Assyrian sculpture and other artifacts have been excavated and are now located in museums around the world. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) occupied the site during the mid-2010s, during which time they bulldozed several of the monuments there and caused considerable damage to the others. Iraqi forces recaptured the area in January 2017
  • Nineveh - Wikipedia
Assyrian royal palace at Nineveh, a reconstruction of Layard, woodcut
View attachment 31228

The MudFlooded Nineveh
The location of Ninevah was known, to some, continuously through the Middle Ages. Benjamin of Tudela visited it in 1170; Petachiah of Regensburg soon after.
  • Carsten Niebuhr recorded its location during the 1761–67 Danish expedition. Niebuhr wrote afterwards that "I did not learn that I was at so remarkable a spot, till near the river. Then they showed me a village on a great hill, which they call Nunia, and a mosque, in which the prophet Jonah was buried. Another hill in this district is called Kalla Nunia, or the Castle of Nineveh. On that lies a village Koindsjug.
Excavation of Nineveh (dirt on top...)
View attachment 31229
Source

Excavations of Nineveh
View attachment 31239
Source

In 1842, the French Consul General at Mosul, Paul-Émile Botta, began to search the vast mounds that lay along the opposite bank of the river. The locals whom he employed in these excavations, to their great surprise, came upon the ruins of a building at the mound of Khorsabad, which, on further exploration, turned out to be the royal palace of Sargon II, in which large numbers of reliefs were found and recorded, though they had been damaged by fire and were mostly too fragile to remove.
  • In 1847 the young British diplomat Austen Henry Layard explored the ruins. Layard did not use modern archaeological methods; his stated goal was "to obtain the largest possible number of well preserved objects of art at the least possible outlay of time and money." In the Kuyunjik mound, Layard rediscovered in 1849 the lost palace of Sennacherib with its 71 rooms and colossal bas-reliefs. He also unearthed the palace and famous library of Ashurbanipal with 22,000 cuneiform clay tablets. Most of Layard's material was sent to the British Museum, but two large pieces were given to Lady Charlotte Guest and eventually found their way to the Metropolitan Museum. The study of the archaeology of Nineveh reveals the wealth and glory of ancient Assyria under kings such as Esarhaddon (681–669 BC) and Ashurbanipal (669–626 BC).
  • The work of exploration was carried on by George Smith, Hormuzd Rassam, and others, and a vast treasury of specimens of Assyria was incrementally exhumed for European museums. Palace after palace was discovered, with their decorations and their sculptured slabs, revealing the life and manners of this ancient people, their arts of war and peace, the forms of their religion, the style of their architecture, and the magnificence of their monarchs.
  • The mound of Kouyunjik was excavated again by the archaeologists of the British Museum, led by Leonard William King, at the beginning of the 20th century. Their efforts concentrated on the site of the Temple of Nabu, the god of writing, where another cuneiform library was supposed to exist. However, no such library was ever found: most likely, it had been destroyed by the activities of later residents.
  • The excavations started again in 1927, under the direction of Campbell Thompson, who had taken part in King's expeditions. Some works were carried out outside Kouyunjik, for instance on the mound of Nebi Yunus, which was the ancient arsenal of Nineveh, or along the outside walls. Here, near the northwestern corner of the walls, beyond the pavement of a later building, the archaeologists found almost 300 fragments of prisms recording the royal annals of Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal, beside a prism of Esarhaddon which was almost perfect.
KD: Just like with everything else, the City of Nineveh had to be dug out from under a whole lot of dirt. Judge for yourself how many feet we are taking about. Certain things never change, and archaeologists keep on ignoring any reasonable explanations related to the arrival of all the mud/dirt. Here are a few excavation photographs.

Photographs
This photo is from the mid-19th century excavation of the colossal statues at the Nergal Gate of the ancient city of Nineveh. This statue was one of two winged bull-men (aka lamassu ) that guarded one of several entrances to Nineveh dated to the time of King Sennacherib*. Named for the Mesopotamian god Nergal, the gate was possibly used for ceremonial purposes since it is the only known gate flanked by stone sculptures of winged bull-men, which were believed to be protective deities.

View attachment 31237
Source

Two Statues
View attachment 31238

A Lamassu sculpture photographed in 1906 at Nimrud, near Nineveh
View attachment 31245
Museum of Lost Objects: The Winged Bull of Nineveh
Ok, I gave up on the photographs. Not my day it is. There are tons of black and white photographs with some serious mudflood-type features. They all belong to various cities from the same area.
P.S. May be... our dug out "Nineveh" is anything but Nineveh. That is if Nineveh had ever existed... but if it did, it could have been at a totally different location. I'm still looking into it.
  • I think we could be presented with the ruins of one of the 17th century cities which TPTB decided to call Nineveh.
'The excavations started again in 1927, under the direction of Campbell Thompson, who had taken part in King's expeditions. Some works were carried out outside Kouyunjik, for instance on the mound of Nebi Yunus, which was the ancient arsenal of Nineveh, or along the outside walls. Here, near the northwestern corner of the walls, beyond the pavement of a later building, the archaeologists found almost 300 fragments of prisms recording the royal annals of Sennacherib, Esarhaddon, and Ashurbanipal, beside a prism of Esarhaddon which was almost perfect. '

R: Wow. Can you imagine?? This sounds so gorgeous-imagine the civilization that would be writing on prisms. Could be computer chips for all we know. The writing on the prisms is fascinating to me, as is the god of 'writing'. Is Nabu/Nebo writing genetic code? From the bible:

Isaiah 46:1

Bel has bowed down, Nebo stoops over; Their images are consigned to the beasts and the cattle. The things that you carry are burdensome, A load for the weary beast.


Jeremiah 48:1

New International Version
Concerning Moab: This is what the LORD Almighty, the God of Israel, says: "Woe to Nebo, for it will be ruined. Kiriathaim will be disgraced and captured; the stronghold will be disgraced and shattered.

New Living Translation
This message was given concerning Moab. This is what the LORD of Heaven’s Armies, the God of Israel, says: “What sorrow awaits the city of Nebo; it will soon lie in ruins. The city of Kiriathaim will be humiliated and captured; the fortress will be humiliated and broken down.

Berean Study Bible
Concerning Moab, this is what the LORD of Hosts, the God of Israel, says: “Woe to Nebo, for it will be devastated. Kiriathaim will be captured and disgraced; the fortress will be shattered and dismantled.

R: Is Nebo a god, a city, or a machine? Also, not to bring westworld into this again, but the lord of "hosts", is striking. Are we talking about a large group of something? A bunch of party hosts? Or 'an animal or plant on or in which a parasite or commensal organism lives'? What about 'a computer that mediates multiple access to databases mounted on it or provides other services to a computer network.' Just thought that was interesting. Here, more pictures of Ninevah.


Check out egg-like qualities of guys beard, and on this bull's body. Reminds me of Ms. Ephesus.
IMG_7277.JPGIMG_7278.JPG


This picture was done by Mary Evans, called 'Tomb of Jonah', circa 1880. This suggests, like you said, could be the ruins of one of the 17th century cities which TPTB decided to call Nineveh. Mud flood all over the place.

IMG_7279.JPGIMG_7282.JPG

What are these ladies holding in their hands?IMG_7284.JPG

Gotta love the 'village' moniker. Nothing to see here. Move along.
IMG_7283.JPG

Lastly, I could be looking at this info too long, but look at hieroglyphic for Moab. Could be 'writing code for creation of limbs of kings who fly'? 😂
IMG_7286.jpg

Wiki Regarding Moab:
The etymology of the word Moab is uncertain. The earliest gloss is found in the Koine GreekSeptuagint[2] which explains the name, in obvious allusion to the account of Moab's parentage, as ἐκ τοῦ πατρός μου ("from my father"). Other etymologies which have been proposed regard it as a corruption of "seed of a father", or as a participial form from "to desire", thus connoting "the desirable (land)".[citation needed] Rashi explains the word Mo'ab to mean "from the father", since ab in Hebrew and Arabic and the rest of the Semitic languages means "father". He writes that as a result of the immodesty of Moab's name, God did not command the israelites to refrain from inflicting pain upon the Moabites in the manner in which he did with regard to the Ammonites. Fritz Hommel regards Moab as an abbreviation of Immo-ab = "his mother is his father".[3]

R: Again, this fits with Ms. Ephesus.
 
Last edited:

aero618

New member
Messages
8
Reactions
3
So true! Def some resemblance to Vatican, too.
View attachment 31727
From my earlier truth seeking, I seem to remember that The Jesuits took over the planning of the rebuilding of St.Peter's Square and drastically changed the origionl plan at that time in particular to the colonades, researchers concidered it to be a Temple of The Sun by it's geometry~ sorry I can't substantiate with citation

The 12 faceted dome also links back to the "centre pieces" of the 1900 Expos
Post automatically merged:

R: Wow. Can you imagine?? This sounds so gorgeous-imagine the civilization that would be writing on prisms. Could be computer chips for all we know. The writing on the prisms is fascinating to me, as is the god of 'writing'. Is Nabu/Nebo writing genetic code? From the bible:
Prism in geometry is just a solid, or 3D object- polyhedron

The Esarhaddon Prism- The British Museum

1571220955177.png

Post automatically merged:

1. The Temple of the Sun in Nineveh
The engraving refers to a draught, created from a "Medallion" found in Egypt and created by John Peter Bellori 1616-1696 WORDS: BIOG: Bellori, John Peter He was a jesuit and influencial with the Queen of Sweden and Sun Worship. He "conjectures" it to be Nineveh.

A bit off topic but regarding these Temples of The Sun and St.Peters Rome;

St.Peters Basillica was rebuilt between 1506 & 1626. St.Peters Square forming the "Temple of The Sun"started after in 1656-7's by Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini ~ note this is the "Renaissance" that reintroduced traditional architecture types from the Polytheism times (NB pagans origionally refered to people who were Polytheits); interesting for Rome as a now "Christian", in 1585 during the rebuilding, the obolisk that stood at the centre of the Circus of Nero was moved 300m to the centre of the later St.Peter's Square design~ not very Christian.

Origional St.Peters Basillica

1571230300344.png
 
Last edited:
Top