The Seal of the Washington Territory. Strange Buildings.

Veritas

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The Territory of Washington was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1853, until November 11, 1889, when the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Washington. It was created from the portion of the Oregon Territory north of the lower Columbia River and north of the 46th parallel east of the Columbia. At its largest extent, it also included the entirety of modern Idaho and parts of Montana and Wyoming, before attaining its final boundaries in 1863.
Seal background: The territorial seal was proposed and designed in 1853 by J.K. Duncan, a lieutenant in the U.S. Army assigned to Territorial Governor Isaac Stevens’ survey party. It was adopted in 1854.

The description: A story in the February 25, 1854, edition of Olympia’s “Pioneer and Democrat” describes the territorial seal: On one side a log cabin and an immigrant wagon with a fir forest in the background; on the other side a sheet of water being traversed by a steamer and sailing vessel, a city in perspective, the Goddess of Hope and an anchor in the center, the figure pointing up to the significant word “Alki” (bye and bye).

Here is Washington. Check out buildings on left side!
Seal-of-Washington-Territory-1854.jpg

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KorbenDallas

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Interesting Seal. That Al-ki or Alki with its meaning of "By and by" looks foreign to the drawing. At least to me it does. 1853 looks weird as well, especially the 53 portion. Considering the skills required to draw "a city in perspective", this 53 looks like it was drawn by someone else.

And speaking of this "city in perspective". Here is the original article from February 25, 1854, edition of Olympia’s “Pioneer and Democrat”, which says "the groundwork of a city appearing".

Seal_Washington_territory_1.jpg

I'm wondering what city this "groundwork" belonged to in 1853-54 in the future State of Washington....

Seal-of-Washington-Territory-1854_1.jpg

A pretty interesting degradation happened to the word Alki.
  • 1854 Alki is a Chinook word meaning "we hope for greatness hereafter, and be content to by our time".
  • 2018 Alki is a Chinook word meaning "by and by".
The Goddess of Hope Elpis (greek) or Spes (roman) was the last item in the Pandora's Box. The last item which did not escape the box.
  • In Hesiod's Works and Days, Elpis was the last item in Pandora's box (or jar).
    • Pandora brings with her a jar or, in most stories, a box containing "burdensome toil and sickness that brings death to men", diseases and "a myriad other pains". Prometheus had – fearing further reprisals - warned his brother Epimetheus not to accept any gifts from Zeus. But Epimetheus did not listen; he accepted Pandora, who promptly scattered the contents of her jar. As a result, Hesiod tells us, "the earth and sea are full of evils". One item, however, did not escape the jar (96–99), hope:
      • Only Hope was left within her unbreakable house,
        she remained under the lip of the jar, and did not
        fly away. Before [she could], Pandora replaced the
        lid of the jar. This was the will of
        aegis-bearing
        Zeus the Cloudgatherer.
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UnusualBean

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What's crazy to me about Chinook Jargon is that nearly everybody spoke it to some degree in PNW and the surrounding areas up through the early 20th century, and I'd never even heard of it until a couple years ago. And now the languages it's based off of are extinct.
 

Red Bird

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I just saw this! I’ve always been interested in the Lewis & Clark journey and have read books with their journals. Now I would love to read the unedited versions. For instance what stuck out from reading was only that the natives seemed lazy on the coast and that they ate dog. Truly weird when you consider that they did it- made it to the pacific!
Going through the Columbia gorge for the first time a few years ago we were amazed about how desolate of wildlife it is-especially Birds. I mean, there’s water there! There’s some there, like bighorn sheep, but not what you would think. Also vegetation.
Could this be because it was actually under water not too long ago as the old maps say?
It could be all of the bird killing windmillls...

Also when they reached the Mandan villages, plains etc. what did they really hear, think and see. They had a goal, I suppose, like most men 🙃 and stuck to it.

I’ve read many books of pioneer journals (mostly women- 5hey wrote a lot then). They are usually put together by ancestors or others who may have left out anything that ‘sounds crazy’ in this, or the last century. . That goes for a lot of biographers I imagine.
 
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Plissken

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Going through the Columbia gorge for the first time a few years ago we were amazed about how desolate of wildlife it is-especially Birds. I mean, there’s water there! There’s some there, like bighorn sheep, but not what you would think. Also vegetation.
Could this be because it was actually under water not too long ago as the old maps say?
I agree! I have lived up and down the Snake River from Pocatello, Idaho to where I currently reside in Kennewick, Washington, the area where the Snake River and Columbia River join up in Eastern Washington. The whole area along the Snake and the upper Columbia looks desolate until you get to the mountains on either side of the flood plain. The official story is the Bonneville floods created all of the canyons and crazy rocks in these areas 14,500 years ago. It eventually flowed through the gorge and out to sea.

During the same time period, there were the Missoula flood events, which supposedly also changed the landscape in Eastern Washington 13,000 to 15,000 years ago.

I think it happened more recently than the official narrative states. Check out the KB post about the changes in the North American Maps. Like the maps with Mer de l'Ouest ("Western Sea") from the 1700s compared with these map about the floods. The Native Americans also have many tales of these floods. They sound a lot like Noah's flood story, they land on a mountain after sending out a bird.... I am reading these stories right now and plan to do a post sometime in the future about these floods.
1762_map.jpg


Bonneville Map
Bonneville flood.JPG


Missoula Maps
Map_missoula_floods.gif


Glacial Lake Columbia (west) and Glacial Lake Missoula (east) are shown south of Cordilleran Ice Sheet. The areas inundated in the Columbia and Missoula floods are shown in red.
Glacial Lake Columbia (west) and Glacial Lake Missoula (east) are shown south of Cordilleran I...jpg


Plissken 🐍
 

Red Bird

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I agree! I have lived up and down the Snake River from Pocatello, Idaho to where I currently reside in Kennewick, Washington, the area where the Snake River and Columbia River join up in Eastern Washington. The whole area along the Snake and the upper Columbia looks desolate until you get to the mountains on either side of the flood plain. The official story is the Bonneville floods created all of the canyons and crazy rocks in these areas 14,500 years ago. It eventually flowed through the gorge and out to sea.

During the same time period, there were the Missoula flood events, which supposedly also changed the landscape in Eastern Washington 13,000 to 15,000 years ago.

I think it happened more recently than the official narrative states. Check out the KB post about the changes in the North American Maps. Like the maps with Mer de l'Ouest ("Western Sea") from the 1700s compared with these map about the floods. The Native Americans also have many tales of these floods. They sound a lot like Noah's flood story, they land on a mountain after sending out a bird.... I am reading these stories right now and plan to do a post sometime in the future about these floods.
View attachment 19958

Bonneville Map
View attachment 19961

Missoula Maps
View attachment 19959

Glacial Lake Columbia (west) and Glacial Lake Missoula (east) are shown south of Cordilleran Ice Sheet. The areas inundated in the Columbia and Missoula floods are shown in red.
View attachment 19960

Plissken 🐍
This is great and can’t wait for a full post.
My husband had a heart attack while we were staying in Kennewick. Folks there were wonderful. Alls well now.

Probably explains all of those huge, weird canyons in eastern Oregon too. It’s like, whoa don’t wreck at those innocuous little bridge railings in the flatlands- it’s a 1000 ft down! This is a big topic because when was ‘ice age’ and how many. Right now I think one ice age after Noah’s flood (a few hundred years later perhaps) not lasting long at all, then more flooding that was more local. All not that long ago.
 
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