The Great Fire of Prescott, Arizona, 1900

BrokenAgate

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Great Prescott Fire | July 14, 1900

Like so many other towns and cities, Prescott, AZ (current population about 42,000) had a Great Fire. It occurred on July 14, 1900, supposedly from an unattended candle that set a lodging house on fire. How did they always manage to find the causes of these "great fires," at a time when cities were lucky to have fire fighting equipment, never mind a forensics department? Did those even exist back then?

Anyway, you know the story by heart already: the fire quickly spread out of control, burning entire neighborhoods to the ground, and everything had to be rebuilt. And of course, it wouldn't be proper for a Great Fire to not follow the script, so they had to make sure the fire department was handicapped in some way; in this case, the pumping station was in the midst of repairs. In a movie, a disabled water system in Act 1 would be the set-up for a disaster in Act 2. But we know that all of life is a movie, right?

Oh, and nobody died. It's a miracle! Cue the preacher finishing up with a sermon about the love of God.

Here is an image of the mess that was left over.

Prescott-Fire-blog.jpg

We can see that, while the buildings were flattened, the trees didn't suffer much...or at all, really. The modern-day fires in California were exactly the same, houses incinerated while the trees were barely scorched.

I'll just come out and say it: It's the same kind of weaponry. Somebody had it back then, and somebody has it now, improved with greater precision. Which city or state is next on the list of "wildfires" to incinerate everything but the vegetation?
 

jd755

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The label "great" is a misnomer. If that picture is the extent of the fire then perhaps its 'paper talk' to put Prescott 'on the map' if there were reports of great fires across the state, country. Politicians and the media are always in cahoots, always telling porkies.
A bit like the naming of storms over here mirrors the naming of Hurricanes over there and typhoons in Asia. The name is a handy reference point off which can hang all manner of bullshit and the date kind of disappears.
Apologies if I am wandering but I write as 'it' arrives.
 

jd755

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Interesting just how few tents there are and yet they have a bandstand up and running!
Here is the tale, common to a few sites.
In 1900, a great fire destroyed most of the buildings on Whiskey Row.
At the time of the fire, the entire bar and back-bar of the Palace Hotel was removed to the square by the patrons as the fire approached, re-installing it after the gutted brick structure was rebuilt. (The size of the back-bar is impressive, and appears not easily moved, even by many hands.)


Blimey. We cannot save the building nor stall the fire but we will save the bar laden with the fire accelerant alcohol. The patrons did it, the patrons who were possibly, more than likely pissed, did it, sound legit, not really.

Here is a clear example of deliberate or accidental obfuscation.
If this image disappears off of the site;

Blue-Sign.jpg

What is left is this description which contradicts the information on the blue sign!

Whiskey Row is full of some of Prescott's oldest history. This street is named Whiskey Row because of the large number of saloons in one place. Whiskey Row developed after a fire in July of 1900 destroyed the entire block. When reconstructed, there was an inordinate amount of bars rebuilt in the area. At one point the block hosted a total of 40 saloons.

Coming back to the worldhistory article;

Starting in the O.K. Lodging House, next door to the south of the newly built Scopel Hotel on South Montezuma at Goodwin, possibly when a miner left a lighted candle stuck in the wall of his room, the fire quickly spread to the Scopel.

Once again outstanding fire investigation skills just as there was in San Francisco 49 years earlier, at least the author of the article dropped in the word "possibly".

The water supply at that time was from a well on Aubrey Street, about a block south, but the pumping plant was being overhauled and repaired, with the engine disconnected from the pump.

How inconvenient especially as the town and area were suffering a prolonged drought;

Anyone who has lived in Arizona knows that, eventually, one topic is bound to surface: drought. When the spring of 1900 rolled into the Central Highlands, an unusually dry spell came with it.

So desperate was the concern about the drought that the mayor pro tem, Fred Brecht—Mayor John Dougherty was out of town—issued a “notice to [the] water consumers” of Prescott on May 21, 1900, that continued to be published right up until July 14. A ban was enacted regarding the use of water for irrigation purposes, i.e., the watering of lawns and gardens.

Time marched on and spring flowed into summer. Still no rain.

All that remains of the principal business portion of the town is tottering walls and piles of charred and burning debris. The fire which started at 10:45 last night was not under control until 3 o'clock this morning, when the fire fighters went a distance in advance of the flames and blew up the buildings on the south side of Goodwin street, preventing them from crossing that street. The most conservative estimate of the total losses are from $1,000,000 to $1,500,000.


Wow blowing up buildings to create a firebreak. But surely a building blown up would leave a lot of dry wood lying around for the advancing fire to use as fuel stepping stones?
And as ever they get the huge financial cost in the story much more important than any human casualties, time and again.

The burned district embraces five blocks, in which were located the principal business houses, both banks, both telegraph offices, three newspaper offices, four hotels and every saloon and every restaurant except one in the town, besides scores of private residences.

Hang on. Doesn't this contradict the blue signs information again?
Five blocks and no-one dies, incredible, truly incredible. I'd lay odds the hotels, the banks, the saloons, restaurants and private residences had folks in them at the time the fire is said to have started.

Going back to the dccourier site;
Today, it is commonly accepted that a miner’s misuse of a miner’s candlestick holder was the cause of the Great Fire. However, Tony Johns—an undersheriff at the time and later a Prescott fire chief—testified that the Great Fire’s spark was a mystery, asserting the candlestick story is nothing but legend. In fact, within days after the catastrophe, the narrative of its cause began changing.


Urban myth, deliberate obfuscation, media lying, who knows.
Five blocks and four and a half blocks mentioned above, four on this sign.

ac100132-abb8-47fb-b7ad-58fe37370299_d.jpg

Saturday night, July 14, 1900, a miner left a candle in the wall of his room in the Scopel Hotel on the southwest corner of Goodwin and Montezuma Streets in Prescott, Arizona. The fire quickly hopped across Goodwin Street and proceeded to consume all of the buildings on "Whiskey Row," leveling the entire block. Though some of the Plaza buildings were built of brick, many were wood, and the destruction was nearly complete. Over 80 businesses were consumed in the fire as it swept its way to Granite and Willis, destroying almost the entire business district. Within 3 days, towns folks were rebuilding their town with brick. Merchants set up their businesses in tents and corrugated metal buildings, and hastily constructed sheds in the meantime. Of the buildings standing at the time of the fire, only a few remain: The Prescott National Bank and the Bank of Prescott (both under construction in 1900), the Knights of Pythias Building on South Cortez Street, and the City Jail and Fire Station on West Goodwin Street.

The fire lasted about 4 hours, burning close to 4 blocks of businesses. No lives were lost. No one was badly hurt. Estimates claim that the fire did roughly 1.5 million dollars in damage. The city of Prescott emerged from the fire with more beautiful historic structures than the ones consumed by the fire.


So the banks were being built when the fire struck!

It certainly has all the ingredients of many other American 'Great' fire saga's it's as though the perpetrators of the fake history really do have only one fire disaster template to run with. Looking at the images they often strike me as being transferable from one location to another as easily as the story in words.
How can a block of destuction appear or disappear?

And reading through this article insurance scam leaps off of the page, to me at least, always to me Link

Before the “Great Fire” of 1900 in downtown Prescott, a three-story stone and brick hotel stood on the southwest corner of Montezuma and Goodwin streets. Generally known as the Scopel Hotel, it was officially the Grand View House.

Builder of the Grand View was Ferdinand Scopel, an Italian immigrant who arrived in the Prescott area in 1882 at the age of 24.


Impressive a three story brick built hotel where did he get the cash from?

Reportedly down to his last dollar, he made a discovery of gold in Crook Canyon in the Hassayampa district, about thirteen miles from Prescott. He struck a rich vein, and began working it with a single mule and an arrastra. He named his claim the Venezia

Might have known!

After selling his mining interests at a goodly profit in 1894, Scopel began a new career as a real estate entrepreneur in town. In 1895 he broke ground on his hotel across from the Courthouse Plaza. The building was reported the following January to be the finest business building constructed in Prescott up to that time.

So in the three years after arriving 'from Italy?' he spent up prospecting, almost down to his 'last dollar' and then mined the gold out, stashed the cash and sold the claim. Who would be fool enough to buy him out?

Then 'in 1895' (no mention of the month note) he began his three story brick hotel building and no more than a year later it was fitted out, and open?

On July 14, 1900, a fire was started by a neglected miner's candle in a wood frame building adjoining the Scopel Hotel.

Oh how very convenient. A 'wood frame building' that 'adjoined' the newly built brick built hotel. This is where I see insurance scam.

The town reservoir on Mt. Vernon St. had gone dry because of over-usage while the pumping station was down for repairs. With a strong breeze from the south blowing the flames toward the Scopel/Grand View hotel, the fire chief had to decide whether to dynamite the hotel to stop the fire's progress or hope that the brick structure would prevent the fire from spreading. He chose the latter. The hotel was rapidly consumed by the fire, and soon most of downtown Prescott also went up in flames. The fire chief was heavily criticized for his decision.

Poor bloke damned if you do damned if you don't. Cannot find his name though so any super sleuths about feel free to fill in the gap.

Although Scopel didn't seem to hang around for the insurance payout so perhaps it was the land he was after?

Almost immediately, Scopel began construction of a new lodging house on the site of the former Grand View. By October, 1900, three months after the fire, Scopel opened a new temporary lodging house and saloon on the site of his former Grand View hotel. The lodging house was newly outfitted and advertised as the Scopel House, “fine rooms, everything new.

By late 1903, Scopel had yet another new hotel under construction at the corner site where his first hotel had burned down. The Arizona Miner reported “... Scopel has commenced work on his building on the corner of Montezuma and Goodwin streets...The new sand stone brick will be used. This will make one of the handsomest buildings in the city when done.”

The new Scopel hotel was even larger and more impressive than the first.


Found a couple more;
1870's Prescott (how can anyone tell?)

Source
prescott,az late 1870's_.jpg


An undated Whiskey row; Source
1171_t990.jpg

Prescott train terminal 1800's

Pinterest so no link
d26a0ff7d47dd5289d70195f585d65aa--arizona-train-stations.jpg

Another undated picture this time of the rebuilt Whiskey row and the all important bandstand!
Bugger it looks like the plan all along was a park around the bandstand.


Another Whiskey row picture again undated but the ditch lines up nicely with first photo in this batch so must be slightly earlier and of course it lines up nicely with either the sidewalk gutter or the edge of the park to my cynical eyes anyway.

Source
1175_t990.jpg



Whiskey row again?
1173_t990.jpg

This one is titled entry into Prescott and to me the park is already there if the trees are any measure;


Duckduckgo's poor linking is frustrating to say the least but here's how Prescott was laid out in 1891.


And finally, and I truly cannot believe this San Francisco style connection, the Russians were coming, possibly!
The duckduckgo image searh presents this description
Prescott, Arizona History: Colony of Russians Arrives to ...
but the link is just the blogspot image store! Source

RussiansGlendale.jpg

Hah found it Colony of Russians Arrives to Farm *UPDATED*

No one knows exactly why they came in early 1916. It was assumed that they were avoiding one of many purges in soviet Russia. (*1) But on January 12th, fourteen railroad cars carrying over 100 Russian colonists and their possessions arrived at Jerome Junction, southeast of present day Chino Valley. They brought with them 151 cattle, 103 horses, chickens, geese and all their household furniture and goods. (*2), (*3) & (*4)

But much later than the fire year. Interesting nonetheless.
 
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Maxine

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No one knows exactly why they came in early 1916. It was assumed that they were avoiding one of many purges in soviet Russia.
How exactly could they be avoiding purges in Soviet Russia if there were was apparently no Soviet Russia yet in 1916? Only a year later a revolution would happend which will be the start of Soviet Russia!
 

jd755

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How exactly could they be avoiding purges in Soviet Russia if there were was apparently no Soviet Russia yet in 1916? Only a year later a revolution would happend which will be the start of Soviet Russia!
Not a clue. The (*1) refers to this source further down on the linked page.
(*1) AH Bisjak, Oral History; Sharlot Hall Museum Archives; Tape #940
 

ripvanwillie

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My family came over from Russia around 1913, but were refused entry. Had to live in Mexico until 1923, and many of my relatives still do. Many Russian immigrants were brought into America at that time to replace the black slaves. My family knew there would be a revolution in Russia many years before it happened, that is why they left in 1913. They suffered from religious persecution and they refused to engage in war so they were not welcome to the new state.
 

jd755

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My family came over from Russia around 1913, but were refused entry. Had to live in Mexico until 1923, and many of my relatives still do. Many Russian immigrants were brought into America at that time to replace the black slaves. My family knew there would be a revolution in Russia many years before it happened, that is why they left in 1913. They suffered from religious persecution and they refused to engage in war so they were not welcome to the new state.
Thankyou.
That explains this from the site link I posted above.

A January 18th, 1917 article in the Prescott Journal Miner revealed a lawsuit that the Russian colony filed against the Hassayampa Alfalfa Farms Company that specifically enumerated the colony's complaints.

First, the Company failed to provide the water necessary in 1916 in time to save the Russian's crops. The Russians sued for $14,995 for the crops they lost that year.

Additionally, the Russians did work in preparing the land and were never paid for it. They plowed extra land, preparing it for future farming and put up fencing. For this, the Russians sought an additional $15,854. However, the Russians wouldn't get the money they sought as the Hassayampa Alfalfa Farms Co. was going out of business. (*12)

(Note to any genealogist who might be looking or some of the names of the Russian colonists: Click on footnote (*12). Page 1 reveals the names of the 20 plaintiffs.)

This, coupled with the declining precipitation of the dry cycle years, caused the colony to leave in mass in 1921 after only 5 years. (*5)

Farming in Glendale, AZ
They arrived as a unit and they left as a unit. "They all boarded a train with all their livestock and all their equipment and everything," Bisjak recalled. They moved south into Glendale, Arizona where irrigation for their crops was assured. Many of the Russian surnames can still be found there today! (*1)

There was, however, one member of the Russian colony that stayed behind. "When they left," Bisjak remembered, "they brought a big old black chicken over. My mother said, 'What's that for?'

"That's for the boy," was the reply, "and so we had that little old black chicken for years and years and years. Nothing happened to it until it died." (*1)


I feel I don't give enough attention to the prejudices 'of the day' and the actions that resulted from them when peering into the past.
 

SunBard

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Trees aren't harmed, the buildings are. If we consider Nature having an intelligence (and I do) could Nature Herself sparked these fires as a warning not to overconsume Her bounty?
 

ripvanwillie

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Thankyou.
That explains this from the site link I posted above.

A January 18th, 1917 article in the Prescott Journal Miner revealed a lawsuit that the Russian colony filed against the Hassayampa Alfalfa Farms Company that specifically enumerated the colony's complaints.

First, the Company failed to provide the water necessary in 1916 in time to save the Russian's crops. The Russians sued for $14,995 for the crops they lost that year.

Additionally, the Russians did work in preparing the land and were never paid for it. They plowed extra land, preparing it for future farming and put up fencing. For this, the Russians sought an additional $15,854. However, the Russians wouldn't get the money they sought as the Hassayampa Alfalfa Farms Co. was going out of business. (*12)

(Note to any genealogist who might be looking or some of the names of the Russian colonists: Click on footnote (*12). Page 1 reveals the names of the 20 plaintiffs.)

This, coupled with the declining precipitation of the dry cycle years, caused the colony to leave in mass in 1921 after only 5 years. (*5)

Farming in Glendale, AZ
They arrived as a unit and they left as a unit. "They all boarded a train with all their livestock and all their equipment and everything," Bisjak recalled. They moved south into Glendale, Arizona where irrigation for their crops was assured. Many of the Russian surnames can still be found there today! (*1)

There was, however, one member of the Russian colony that stayed behind. "When they left," Bisjak remembered, "they brought a big old black chicken over. My mother said, 'What's that for?'

"That's for the boy," was the reply, "and so we had that little old black chicken for years and years and years. Nothing happened to it until it died." (*1)


I feel I don't give enough attention to the prejudices 'of the day' and the actions that resulted from them when peering into the past.
This article you posted has me a bit confused. I was born into the Russian Molokan church in southern California, and I was told a similar story when I was young about Molokans who lived in Glendale, AZ. This sounds like the same story to me.

So, I'm wondering why your article says they built a Greek Orthodox church. Molokans are Molokans because they revolted against the orthodox church. That church is there nemesis. They don't worship together. That would be like Martin Luther inviting the Pope over for supper and a prayer.

So, like much of my history, a new mystery appears. Can a similar fate happen to two completely different groups of immigrants from Russia and they both end up in the same tiny farm community on the edge of an American desert? Seems beyond unlikely to me.

And it is true no one knows why we all came. Everyone I ask gives a different story. I have stories from my grandfather who was born in Guadalupe, Mexico. I actually lived in Glendale, AZ for a short while. And yes, there was a Russian Molokan church there. I think it still is. I never went there or met any of the local Russians. Just an odd coincidence, I suppose.

The main reason my relatives left for America, I believe, was opportunity. Molokans, now mostly known as spiritual Christians, were mostly peasant farmers and laborers who were persecuted for their beliefs, and since they are pacifists, they have been moved around quite a bit. Primarily against war, but also against the "new" Orthodox church which tried to change their beliefs and customs from the old Christian religion. They came to America to live a Molokan life, an never intended to assimilate and develop American ways, and that is why they have been persecuted here and are slowly becoming extinct.

Lot's of Molokans came to America in the late 1800's early 1900's. Some Russian immigrants apparently pretended to be Molokans once they found they could get into America via that belief. There were some men who made a healthy living importing Russians into America (much like the coyotes who today bring Mexican laborers into America from Mexico for a profit). They were told to tell the men at the border they are Molokans and were thus sent to the Molokan communities in the Los Angeles area.

Growing up there was always this question among us, who is a Molokan and who is "not of us." I clearly fell into the latter category, but primarily of my own volition!

Who knows what really happened?

Here is a link about the Glendale, AZ Russian farmers and also a bit about my relatives for you to explore, and it does mirror some of your article:

Bowen — Russian Farmers’ Village in Glendale, Arizona
 

SunBard

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This article you posted has me a bit confused. I was born into the Russian Molokan church in southern California, and I was told a similar story when I was young about Molokans who lived in Glendale, AZ. This sounds like the same story to me.

So, I'm wondering why your article says they built a Greek Orthodox church. Molokans are Molokans because they revolted against the orthodox church. That church is there nemesis. They don't worship together. That would be like Martin Luther inviting the Pope over for supper and a prayer.

So, like much of my history, a new mystery appears. Can a similar fate happen to two completely different groups of immigrants from Russia and they both end up in the same tiny farm community on the edge of an American desert? Seems beyond unlikely to me.

And it is true no one knows why we all came. Everyone I ask gives a different story. I have stories from my grandfather who was born in Guadalupe, Mexico. I actually lived in Glendale, AZ for a short while. And yes, there was a Russian Molokan church there. I think it still is. I never went there or met any of the local Russians. Just an odd coincidence, I suppose.

The main reason my relatives left for America, I believe, was opportunity. Molokans, now mostly known as spiritual Christians, were mostly peasant farmers and laborers who were persecuted for their beliefs, and since they are pacifists, they have been moved around quite a bit. Primarily against war, but also against the "new" Orthodox church which tried to change their beliefs and customs from the old Christian religion. They came to America to live a Molokan life, an never intended to assimilate and develop American ways, and that is why they have been persecuted here and are slowly becoming extinct.

Lot's of Molokans came to America in the late 1800's early 1900's. Some Russian immigrants apparently pretended to be Molokans once they found they could get into America via that belief. There were some men who made a healthy living importing Russians into America (much like the coyotes who today bring Mexican laborers into America from Mexico for a profit). They were told to tell the men at the border they are Molokans and were thus sent to the Molokan communities in the Los Angeles area.

Growing up there was always this question among us, who is a Molokan and who is "not of us." I clearly fell into the latter category, but primarily of my own volition!

Who knows what really happened?

Here is a link about the Glendale, AZ Russian farmers and also a bit about my relatives for you to explore, and it does mirror some of your article:

Bowen — Russian Farmers’ Village in Glendale, Arizona
What was the old Christian religion? I've always felt there was some chicanery going on with Christian history.
 

Banta

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The fire happened on the 111th anniversary of Bastille Day.
Post automatically merged:

Okay this is all probably a load of bad dot-connecting, but I think it's interesting nonetheless.

Prescott Arizona was named for William H. Prescott, "American historian and Hispanist, who is widely recognized by historiographers to have been the first American scientific historian."

That's pretty fancy, getting the big "s" in the front of his history. Definition for "scientific historian":

"A scientific historian, who uses scientific methods such as statistics or systematic comparisons, can be contrasted with a narrative historian, who narrates sequences of events in the past, telling the "story" of what has happened before the present."
Oh, those scientific methodS! ...by the way, if you search duckduckgo for "scientific historian" in quotes, Prescott's Britannica wiki is the first result.

Let's see if this sounds "scientific" to you:

During his lifetime, he was upheld as one of the greatest living American intellectuals, and knew personally many of the leading political figures of the day, in both the United States and Britain. Prescott has become one of the most widely translated American historians, and was an important figure in the development of history as a rigorous academic discipline. Historians admire Prescott for his exhaustive, careful, and systematic use of archives, his accurate recreation of sequences of events, his balanced judgments and his lively writing style. He was primarily focused on political and military affairs, largely ignoring economic, social, intellectual, and cultural forces that in recent decades historians have focused on. Instead, he wrote narrative history, subsuming unstated causal forces in his driving storyline.
So, he's telling a story. But Scientifically.

Alright, I'm already off in left field here. Anyway, Prescott was the Homer of his day, in that "Despite suffering from serious visual impairment, which at times prevented him from reading or writing for himself, Prescott became one of the most eminent historians of 19th century America."

What's funny is his Wiki says:

Prescott's eyesight degenerated after being hit in the eye with a crust of bread during a food fight as a student, and it remained weak and unstable throughout the rest of his life.
but the Wiki on the William Hickling Prescott House, where he lived in Boston later in life says:

The house was designated a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 1964,[2] and was listed on National Register of Historic Places in 1966,[1] for its association with Prescott, who gained a reputation for his books on Spanish (and Spanish colonial) history. His 1837 History of the Conquest of Mexico received great acclaim both in the United States and in Europe. Due to his blindness (caused by an incident during a bar brawl), he employed researchers and secretaries to acquire documents and prepare his manuscripts.
This is probably just bad wiki, now that I look at the source.

blinded.PNG


https://npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NHLS/66000765_text

Well, maybe they wouldn't have so many commons brawls if there weren't bars there. Not very smart, Harvard!

So, we're going with blinded by bread. Moving on:

Prescott was admitted to the Phi Beta Kappa Society as a senior, which he considered a great personal honor,[18] and graduated from Harvard in 1814. After a short period of rheumatic illness, he embarked on an extended tour of Europe.

Prescott first traveled to the island of São Miguel in the Azores, where his grandfather and Portuguese grandmother lived.[19] After two weeks, he left for the cooler climate of London, where he stayed with the distinguished surgeon Astley Cooper and the oculist William Adams.[20] Prescott first used a noctograph while staying with Adams; the tool became a permanent feature of his life, allowing him to write independently in spite of his impaired eyesight. He visited Hampton Court Palace with future American president John Quincy Adams, at the time a diplomat in London, where they saw the Raphael Cartoons.
Apparently easy for nearly blind people to go out extended Europeans holidays in the early 19th century. Also, he definitely had some sort of a relationship with John Quincy Adams it seems, as he popped up earlier too:

As a young man, Prescott frequented the Boston Athenæum, which at the time held the 10,000-volume private library of John Quincy Adams, who was on a diplomatic mission to Russia
Prescott was big into the history of Spain:

Prescott first became interested in the history of Spain after his friend, the Harvard professor George Ticknor, sent him copies of his lectures on the subject.[30] Prescott's studies initially remained broad, but he started preparing material on Ferdinand and Isabella in January 1826.[31] His acquaintance Pascual de Gayangos y Arce helped him construct a sizable personal library of historical books and manuscripts concerning the subject. Alexander Hill Everett, an American diplomat in Spain, also provided him with material which was unavailable to Prescott in Boston.[32] However, progress was stalled almost immediately, due to a sudden deterioration in Prescott's eyesight. Unable to find a reader fluent in Spanish, Prescott was forced to work through Spanish texts with an assistant who did not understand the language.[33] When Alexander Everett heard of this situation, he provided Prescott with the services of George Lunt, who had adequate knowledge of Spanish for the task. However, this could only be a temporary arrangement, and he was replaced by a man named Hamilton Parker, who held the position for a year.[34] Eventually George Ticknor, who was by then in charge of the department of modern literature at Harvard University, found James L. English, who worked with Prescott until 1831.[35] Among the books studied by Prescott in this period, Ticknor lists Juan Antonio Llorente's Historia crítica de la Inquisición de España, Historia de los Reyes Católicos don Fernando y doña Isabel by Andrés Bernáldez [es], Voltaire's Charles XII and William Roscoe's Life of Lorenzo de Medici, which were to be the sources on which the History of Ferdinand and Isabella was to be based.[36] In spring 1828, Prescott visited Washington, where he and Ticknor dined with John Quincy Adams at the White House, and saw Congress in session.
He SAW Congress in action. About as well as the rest of us when talking about the time period in question...

He wrote the History of Ferdinand and Isabella, linked here:

History of the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella : Prescott, William Hickling, 1796-1859 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Not sure if anything of interest is in there, but he mentions that he's doing all of this research blind within the first couple pages.

He followed this up with:

However, after writing to Ángel Calderón de la Barca, a Spanish minister living in Mexico, who was able to provide source material, Prescott started research on what was to become the History of the Conquest of Mexico.[58] He extensively read the works of Alexander von Humboldt, who had written on Mesoamerica, and started corresponding with the historian Washington Irving, the Swiss writer Sismondi and the French historian Jacques Nicolas Augustin Thierry.[59][60] He also received assistance in collecting sources from a college friend, Middleton, and a Dr. Lembke. In contrast to the lengthy time spent researching the History of Ferdinand and Isabella, Prescott started drafting the History of the Conquest of Mexico in October 1839. However, Prescott faced difficulties in writing the work which he had not encountered previously. There was relatively little scholarship on Aztec civilization, and Prescott dismissed much of it as "speculation", and he therefore had to rely almost exclusively on primary sources (with the exception of Humboldt). In particular, he considered Edward King's theory that the pre-Columbian civilizations were non-indigenous to be fallacious, although he was greatly indebted to him for his anthology of Aztec codices in the Antiquities of Mexico.
1565920941054.png


Bust in his Sunday's finest Toga, as was the custom at the time. I can't seem to find an actual picture of the bust, though it appears to be located in the Boston Athenæum.

Prescott was elected to the Institut de France in February 1845, in recognition of his accomplishments as a historian. He took the place of Martín Fernández de Navarrete, who had died the previous year, after a vote was cast. He was also admitted to the Prussian Academy of Sciences in Berlin.
There's the French connection. Not very strong, I know, but this guy... he got around!

In March 1845, his eyesight, which had recovered significantly, suddenly deteriorated. Prescott was also suffering from acute dyspepsia and rheumatism, and he travelled to Nahant to "benefit from the sea-air".[85] This did not prevent him travelling to Washington, where he dined at the White House with President James K. Polk. He was also entertained by John Y. Mason, the former United States Secretary of the Navy, who informed him that a copy of Prescott's Conquest of Mexico had been placed in the library of every fighting ship...

...Prescott visited Washington D.C. in spring 1850, where he met Zachary Taylor, then President of the United States, as well as numerous other prominent figures, including Henry Bulwer, the British ambassador, and Daniel Webster, the former Secretary of State, who had been a friend of Prescott's father.[101] Soon afterward, he decided to visit England. He embarked from New York on May 22, and arrived at Liverpool on June 3.[102] There he stayed with an old friend, Alexander Smith, and became reacquainted with Mary Lyell, the wife of the geologist Charles Lyell.[103] He traveled with the Lyells to London, where they stayed in Mivart's Hotel. Prescott was greeted in London, as in Washington, by the most important members of society—he dined with the Foreign Secretary and future Prime MinisterHenry Temple, the former Prime Minister Robert Peel, as well as the elderly Duke of Wellington.[104] He went to the races at Ascot, and was presented at court to Queen Victoria.[105] On June 22, he traveled to Oxford to receive an honorary doctorate in law. In Oxford, he stayed at Cuddesdon Palace, the home of the Bishop of Oxford, Samuel Wilberforce, who was absent because of the christening of the infant Prince Arthur.[103][106] Prescott met Spencer Compton, the president of the Royal Society, who was also receiving an honorary degree.[107] He left London for Paris, where he arrived on July 20. Two days later, he traveled to Brussels, where he stayed in Coudenberg, the site of a residence of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, returning to London on July 29.[108] Traveling north, Prescott visited Alnwick Castle and the ruins of Hulm Abbey in Northumbria. On his arrival in Edinburgh, he met the geologists Adam Sedgwick and Roderick Murchison, whom he accompanied to Inveraray, where he visited Inveraray Castle.[109] Prescott then traveled south, through Staffordshire, where he was entertained by George Sutherland-Leveson-Gower. He embarked for New York on September 14, arriving on September 27....
So, he was very well thought of, so much so that he gets a town in Arizona named after him only five years after his death.
 
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jd755

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This article you posted has me a bit confused. I was born into the Russian Molokan church in southern California, and I was told a similar story when I was young about Molokans who lived in Glendale, AZ. This sounds like the same story to me.

So, I'm wondering why your article says they built a Greek Orthodox church. Molokans are Molokans because they revolted against the orthodox church. That church is there nemesis. They don't worship together. That would be like Martin Luther inviting the Pope over for supper and a prayer.

So, like much of my history, a new mystery appears. Can a similar fate happen to two completely different groups of immigrants from Russia and they both end up in the same tiny farm community on the edge of an American desert? Seems beyond unlikely to me.

And it is true no one knows why we all came. Everyone I ask gives a different story. I have stories from my grandfather who was born in Guadalupe, Mexico. I actually lived in Glendale, AZ for a short while. And yes, there was a Russian Molokan church there. I think it still is. I never went there or met any of the local Russians. Just an odd coincidence, I suppose.

The main reason my relatives left for America, I believe, was opportunity. Molokans, now mostly known as spiritual Christians, were mostly peasant farmers and laborers who were persecuted for their beliefs, and since they are pacifists, they have been moved around quite a bit. Primarily against war, but also against the "new" Orthodox church which tried to change their beliefs and customs from the old Christian religion. They came to America to live a Molokan life, an never intended to assimilate and develop American ways, and that is why they have been persecuted here and are slowly becoming extinct.

Lot's of Molokans came to America in the late 1800's early 1900's. Some Russian immigrants apparently pretended to be Molokans once they found they could get into America via that belief. There were some men who made a healthy living importing Russians into America (much like the coyotes who today bring Mexican laborers into America from Mexico for a profit). They were told to tell the men at the border they are Molokans and were thus sent to the Molokan communities in the Los Angeles area.

Growing up there was always this question among us, who is a Molokan and who is "not of us." I clearly fell into the latter category, but primarily of my own volition!

Who knows what really happened?

Here is a link about the Glendale, AZ Russian farmers and also a bit about my relatives for you to explore, and it does mirror some of your article:

Bowen — Russian Farmers’ Village in Glendale, Arizona
It's not my article. I merely found it by using the 'dark arts' of researching away from wikiwakiallmadeup and youtube.
Here's the link to the site the article is on Colony of Russians Arrives to Farm *UPDATED*
Drew Desmond is the author and his contact details are in his header and bio. He would be the one who is likely to have the answers you seek.
 

Red Bird

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The fire happened on the 111th anniversary of Bastille Day.
Post automatically merged:

Okay this is all probably a load of bad dot-connecting, but I think it's interesting nonetheless.

Prescott Arizona was named for William H. Prescott, "American historian and Hispanist, who is widely recognized by historiographers to have been the first American scientific historian."

That's pretty fancy, getting the big "s" in the front of his history. Definition for "scientific historian":



Oh, those scientific methodS! ...by the way, if you search duckduckgo for "scientific historian" in quotes, Prescott's Britannica wiki is the first result.

Let's see if this sounds "scientific" to you:



So, he's telling a story. But Scientifically.

Alright, I'm already off in left field here. Anyway, Prescott was the Homer of his day, in that "Despite suffering from serious visual impairment, which at times prevented him from reading or writing for himself, Prescott became one of the most eminent historians of 19th century America."

What's funny is his Wiki says:



but the Wiki on the William Hickling Prescott House, where he lived in Boston later in life says:



This is probably just bad wiki, now that I look at the source.

View attachment 27193

https://npgallery.nps.gov/NRHP/GetAsset/NHLS/66000765_text

Well, maybe they wouldn't have so many commons brawls if there weren't bars there. Not very smart, Harvard!

So, we're going with blinded by bread. Moving on:



Apparently easy for nearly blind people to go out extended Europeans holidays in the early 19th century. Also, he definitely had some sort of a relationship with John Quincy Adams it seems, as he popped up earlier too:



Prescott was big into the history of Spain:



He SAW Congress in action. About as well as the rest of us when talking about the time period in question...

He wrote the History of Ferdinand and Isabella, linked here:

History of the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella : Prescott, William Hickling, 1796-1859 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

Not sure if anything of interest is in there, but he mentions that he's doing all of this research blind within the first couple pages.

He followed this up with:



View attachment 27198

Bust in his Sunday's finest Toga, as was the custom at the time. I can't seem to find an actual picture of the bust, though it appears to be located in the Boston Athenæum.



There's the French connection. Not very strong, I know, but this guy... he got around!



So, he was very well thought of, so much so that he gets a town in Arizona named after him only five years after his death.
Yes reading the wiki article they passed up the founders and renamed the town after a historian.

I’m sure there is a connection to our infamous Bush family. I couldn’t find the connection in a quick search but I’m sure it’s there as their Samuel Prescott line is from Massachusetts etc too, as the Bushes are also. Calling Miles Mathis! They really are all related.
Remember a Bush ancestor was around San Francisco, during its fire years,too.
Added: also 911. Maybe we should revisit each fire here to see if there was a Bush ancestor hanging around...🤓🧐
 
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