The Ghost Forrest of Neskowin, Oregon

Timeshifter

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Please move this KD if in wrong forum

I came across this story just now, as I thought mm, 1700? Isn't that about the time we discuss for possible world wide cataclysm?

The Ghost Forrest of Neskowin, Oregon

Reading the article, the rhetoric is the same of that which we use here... Mud, Tsunami etc

Ghost_Forest_Neskowin_Oregon.jpg.990x0_q80_crop-smart.jpg

'Geologists believe there was once a vast forest of cedar and sitka spruce trees on this spot, about 90 miles southwest of Portland, reports The Telegraph. They likely stood as tall as 200 feet. But in 1700, a massive earthquake struck the area, burying the towering trees deep in mud and eventually the ocean'

Key words: Likely, Mud, Ocean...

'Then powerful storms caused by El Nino ravaged the coast in the winter of 1997 to 1998. The fierce storm eroded parts of the beach, unearthing the remnants of the once-towering trees'
forest-170668216_wwwalamycom_The-Ghost-Forest-at-an-extreme-minus-tide-with-sunrise-and-fog-Ne...jpg

So until 1998, no one knew these trees where there? No boats or ships had ever struck them? Does this region still grow 200ft cedar and sitka spruce trees?

it seems that there are a few around...

'Sitka spruce assumes growth forms from low, twisted, gnarled headland scrub that is deformed by wind-blown sand and salt spray to trees of impressive size. A tree at Quinault Lake in Olympic National Park in Washington State is 191 feet tall. A tree in Clatsop County, Oregon, on county land, claimed to be the National Champion, is 206 feet tall. Both trees are nearly 18 feet in diameter.'

Source

'Visitors now can see about 100 ancient tree stumps rising from the sand and waves when the tide is out. More stumps are visible in winter when tides are at their lowest. Travel Oregon describes the unveiling as "a mysterious and beautiful sightseer’s dream."

The petrified trees are draped in barnacles, mussels and other sea creatures'

"The center of some of the particularly large stumps have been eroded away, creating shallow pools in which sea life gets trapped when the tide is out," writes Sarah Betty in Travel Oregon. "You can sometimes see small fish or crabs in these little pools, waiting for the tide to come back in and release them back into the ocean."

What caught my eye was the date of 1700, a quick google on the earthquake bring up this from waki The Cascadia Earthquake

'The earthquake caused a tsunami which struck the coast of Japan, and may also be linked to the Bonneville Slide and the Tseax Cone eruption in British Columbia.

Saying this event made it all the way to Japan, and may be linked to other events is a great way of hiding a worldwide event?

The opening line on waki:

'The earthquake took place at about 21:00 Pacific Time on January 26, 1700 (NS). Although there are no written records for the region from the time, the timing of the earthquake has been inferred from Japanese records of a tsunami that does not correlate with any other Pacific Rim quake. The Japanese records exist primarily in the modern-day Iwate Prefecture, in communities such as Tsugaruishi, Kuwagasaki and Ōtsuchi.'

Roughly translated, we are making this up. I am sure the good people of Oregon would be keeping written records in 1700s.

If we search disasters in Japan 1700 we get this from 3 years later Genroku earthquake but on a quick search I could find nothing else.

I don't have time just now to search further, but I would be interested to see if forum members can shed any more light on this location and events.

Are we talking singular event, or part of a bigger cataclysm?

Cheers, TS.
 

Andrinus

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Good post! (y) The images are quite atmospheric. One thing I dont understand: were the trees already petrified when they get covered with mud (how would that be possible?) or did they need only 300 years to transform into stone?
 
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Timeshifter

Timeshifter

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Good post! (y) The images are quite atmospheric. One thing I dont understand: were the trees already petrified when they get covered with mud (how would that be possible?) or did they need only 300 years to transform into stone?
Excellent question! Im sure there is discussion about knowledge of instant petrification process on the forum somewhere. Ie, build with wood & turn the stone..
 

Red Bird

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Well there could have been a boat or trapper, and natives but Lewis & Clark just travelled over in 1805. Pretty young country, so to speak.
 

whitewave

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I came across this story just now, as I thought mm, 1700? Isn't that about the time we discuss for possible world wide cataclysm?


What caught my eye was the date of 1700, a quick google on the earthquake bring up this from waki The Cascadia Earthquake
I don't have time just now to search further, but I would be interested to see if forum members can shed any more light on this location and events.
I posted about this orphan tsunami in this thread.
"An "orphan tsunami" in 1700 could explain the mudflood evidence. A Cascadia earthquake at that time of an 8 or 9 magnitude wreaked havoc all the way to Japan. "In the 1980s and 1990s, scientists conducting fieldwork found evidence that coastal lands in the Northwest dropped suddenly and were inundated by tsunami waves and mud. All along the Oregon and Washington coast, the rapid advance of seawater had buried delicate marsh plants that were still alive and killed Sitka spruce, leaving behind rotting stumps. Rot-resistant western red cedar survived longer and their remnants became known as “ghost forests.”
Distribution and sediments of 60 sites along the Cascadia margin of Western North America indicate that the entire subduction zone was buried in mud. Seattle has an elevation of 187 feet and is about 96-134 miles (depending on route) to the ocean and that's a loooooong way to throw big piles of mud. Still, it's a possibility."
 

Red Bird

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Remember the maps from the 1500's showing the whole NWest under water. I couldn't find them right away- maybe somebody could post them. There was more than one, and why would they just blot that part out, when the rest of the West Coast even had place names.
 

WildFire2000

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The evidence for a global reaction to the grand solar minimum and extensive Earth-based geological and atmospheric craziness across the globe due to changes in the sun are reaching ridiculous levels. The timing in cataclysmic events, the weather patterns, the geology. It's all coming to a .. Who ACTUALLY knows and how long have they known? WHY are they hiding it and running this planet and society into the ground KNOWING it will happen again, or are we truly just wandering around in ignorance and the past is hidden .. by ... accident? Are the lies what people actually believed? I struggle to think that there isn't a group of SOMEONE that knows and actively worked to keep the truth of it all hidden over the last 200-ish years, but I keep coming back to the WHY question.

I've mentioned it many times, and so I'm doing it again, the WildHeretic map thread is absolutely crucial to any discussion to the late 1600's and early 1700's for dates and coastal changes, as well as the historical movements of governmental and religious powers from the time. The maps KD found and posted from the 1500's and the massive changes to the North American continent are undeniable, especially when you look at the drastic changes around the same time period for the entire world. If you drop the dogmatic "science" of our day and look at it with an open mind the story that they tell is one that should trigger unity and cooperation to prepare for the coming onslaught we're bound for... are we that shallow as a species?
 

jd755

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Found this from 2008
Research on Neskowin stumps creates uproar

It says there were 200 tree stumps uncovered so a wood not really a forest. Forest evokes great size in the mind of the reader, a wood much less so. Just a method to obfuscate by exaggeration I have noticed, since coming here, that appears in many stories of the past be it recent past or ancient past. Maybe nothing in it but feels to me it is of significance.

Any update on the attempt to test these tree stumps?

The other thing is that even today most of humanity lives by water. Mostly the sea, for the obvious reason there is a lot of sea coastline and I find it incredible that tales of tsunami or sudden water infiltration for whatever reason would not come through time from the people who witnessed the event or its aftermath either by oral recollections in families, diaries, journals etc.
Evidence from these sources is much more reliable, to me I hasten to add, than 'official sources'.
Has anyone who has such a rich family history record, as a fair few have on here, seen anything in them relating to any catastrophic event similar to tsunami, earthquake, that sort of level or even localised catastrophes as would appear, to me, always to me, appear to be the case with this flooded wood?
My family history is scant, well doumented 'officially' but no tales of anything catastrophic. Between 1790 and 1960 some were in Chile, South Africa, Canada, United Kingdom and Australia.
 

Ice Nine

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We were camping on the Oregon coast in the winter of 1997-1998 when the stumps were revealed. Not only that but it was the best agate picking trip we have ever had. Some agates were as big as a large potato.
Good post! (y) The images are quite atmospheric. One thing I dont understand: were the trees already petrified when they get covered with mud (how would that be possible?) or did they need only 300 years to transform into stone?
I have not been to the Neskowin forest when they were exposed, so I have never touched them, but I have been to many other spots and the trees and roots are not petrified. not at all, they are preserved by the sand, silt and saltwater, but not petrified.

Actually there are spots all along the Oregon coast where they become exposed now on really low winter tides. I've been going to the Oregon coast every year for over 45 years. So I know it like the back of my hand. And I can assure you all, they are not petrified.
semi- petrified forests
Among the finds still visible are 4,000-year-old stumps, which are showing in various spots on the coast. There’s a wild display of geological oddities happening right now, with those semi-petrified forests as well as freakish things called “red towers.”

Ghost forest at Arch Cape this month (photo Tiffany Boothe, Seaside Aquarium)

The stumps are the result of an ancient forest becoming frozen in time by sand, clay or muck of some sort surrounding them, which kills them but also preserves them for ages in an oxygen-free environment. Some are around 1,000 years old; most are about 5,000 to 4,000 years old


Where to find ghost forests

but what I find equally fascinating is, see the red arrow I placed at the bottom of the cliff, which is 1,578 feet high, there are tree roots protruding out from under all that, this is at Cape Lookout and they can be seen at anytime. But the when the tide is very low, exposed tree roots are all over the beach. So besides the land dropping 10 to 30 feet during an earthquake, which some experts say happened, there was also a great deal of mud and rock that covered the area as well, at least that is how it seems to me. None of the trees are petrified, the wood is quite intact, especially what is protruding out of the bottom of the cliff face.

Cape-Lookout-State-Park-beach-cliffs-Oregon-Coast.jpg

This is predominantly what you see at all the ghost forest locations, with Neskowin being the most talked about for it has the standing stumps.

roots 1.jpgroots 2.jpgroots.jpg


 
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WildFire2000

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Thanks for that info Ice, that's interesting.

My family is considering a move westward, and if I make it out where I think we're going, it'd be much easier to see some of these things for myself. I'd love to see the forests of Oregon, California, and Washington state. There's so much stuff.

All that said, the fact the trees aren't petrified is pretty amazing. Someone should try and trace those roots. .. ground penetrating radar or something instead of digging them out all invasively. I wonder if they're all connected in a giant root system like the Redwood forest, making them a similarly massive single tree life-form as they've stated the other forest is.
 

Ice Nine

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Thanks for that info Ice, that's interesting.

My family is considering a move westward, and if I make it out where I think we're going, it'd be much easier to see some of these things for myself. I'd love to see the forests of Oregon, California, and Washington state. There's so much stuff.

All that said, the fact the trees aren't petrified is pretty amazing. Someone should try and trace those roots. .. ground penetrating radar or something instead of digging them out all invasively. I wonder if they're all connected in a giant root system like the Redwood forest, making them a similarly massive single tree life-form as they've stated the other forest is.
They are Sitka spruce trees and I do know Spruce is one of the hardest wood there is. Here a bit about some research that was done.

Research on Neskowin stumps creates uproar

"The stumps looked very intact and very preserved," said Zald, who teaches classes on tree ring patterns. "It is rare to see stumps so old. Usually they are rotted. It occurred to me these are a really unique asset to find out about the climate on the coast of Oregon."

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department gave him permission to conduct his research. The agency allowed Zald to take core samples -- obtained through a tiny hole made by a borer -- from up to 30 trees and cut 10-inch wedges with a chain saw from up to six trees.

"The problem is that the wood is already deteriorating," Zald said. "If you try to core it, the core that comes out is rotted in fragments and falls apart. We tried coring 10 or 15 different stumps in multiple locations on multiple stumps, and it all had the same result."

The Oregon coast is spectacular, so is northern California and the Washington coast is pretty wild too.

There are many many exposed cliff faces all along the coast, here is a particularly spectacular place, Beverly Beach State Park on the Oregon coast, we've found many interesting rocks and clam fossils there over the decades. And also you will see buried trees in the cliff sides many places as well.

Some major event rolled over the coast at one time or two, burying and burning as well, we've seen charred trees in the cliffs. Which if it was from a major volcanic event you would expect some charred trees mixed in the lahar that flowed to the sea.

Take a short gander at some of the geology of Beverly Beach, this is south of the ghost forest areas.
 

esgee1

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I grew up in Oregon. I hiked in a lot of the forests as a kid. It always amazed me to find remnants of huge tree stumps. Once upon a time Oregon had some very large trees. Most of them were cut down in the 19th and early 20th century. I can also attest to finding remnants of ancient forests/tree roots being exposed on the coastal beaches.

If you ever get a chance to visit the Oregon Coast, I highly recommend it. My family would always visit Florence (for Mo's Clam Chowder and salt water taffy), sea lion caves and the Heceta Beach lighthouse during summer vacations. Then northwards up to Newport and Tillamook, or southwards to Coos Bay and Bandon.

Sea-Lion-Caves.png

Photo by Art Bromage from Seattle - Sea Lion Cave, CC BY-SA 2.0, File:Sea-Lion-Caves.png - Wikimedia Commons

We would stop for the various attractions and beaches along the way. I have fond memories of touring the famous cheese factory in Tillamook (there's one in Bandon too). Newport also is home to the Oregon Coast Aquarium. And if you make a slight detour inland before reaching Tillamook, you can visit Howard Hughes's Spruce Goose in McMinnville.


There's many more interesting places to visit in Oregon, many you can hike to or visit by car (if you're unable to do a lot of walking). There's really lots to see if you enjoy traveling by car and/or doing outdoor stuff. I recommend Travel Oregon to get you started.

Cheers! 🍻
 

Ice Nine

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Been there done that, how about Yachats and the 804 trail/ Smelt Sands a must see place,a spectacular little walk along the rocky headland, with waves crashing all along the jaunt. And Devil's Chun and Thor's Well at Cape Perpetua. Yes there is much to see and do and lots of great beach combing, we have found a lot of fossils and agates and just plain unusual rocks.
 

JustWow

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Remember the maps from the 1500's showing the whole NWest under water. I couldn't find them right away- maybe somebody could post them. There was more than one, and why would they just blot that part out, when the rest of the West Coast even had place names.
Americas Dutch version.PNG
I have many maps saved in a folder- I do not know how I made this my desktop background (some time ago) but when you made your comment I thought "Oh, I have one right here!"
 

Andrinus

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I have not been to the Neskowin forest when they were exposed, so I have never touched them, but I have been to many other spots and the trees and roots are not petrified. not at all, they are preserved by the sand, silt and saltwater, but not petrified
Thanks @Ice Nine for the clarification 👍 I thought about this too first, but then ran into the trap of taking a single word much too serious, just because it was found, uhm, in the internet 🤣
 

WorldWar1812

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Petrified trees.

Varna (Bulgaria)
Friday – Varna, Bulgaria | Peter's Cruise Blog



Petrified forest in Uzbekistan. Check how bark and inner core has disappeared.

What would have caused that petrification? Abscence of oxygen, and high degrees temperatures.




What about (as some mythological sources tell us), one day sun swept closer to earth surface, burning wide areas of our beautiful planet?

Did you know Pyramid comes from "in the middle of the fire"?



Rosicrucians sure knows.

"Black Desert" Egypt, near Gizeh Plateau (officially volcanic basaltic stones)..........but no volcanoes there.



Geology has been faked as much as history.
 

jd755

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Well it seems, as far as I and a couple of search engines can tell, the samples cut from the stumps have either never been analysed or if they have the results have never been published or put 'on the net', unless a sleuth on here can track them down.
 

Ice Nine

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I was looking at the petrified forest in Uzbekistan yesterday and sure can't figure it out. It reminds of something like microwaves blowing out the center of the trees first, disintegrating/vaporizing the core of the trees. And then mineralizing the trees themselves.

There is also a fossil forest in Yellowstone. The Fossil Forest of Yellowstone

There is a small petrified forest in Egypt with some really mondo bizarro trees. Maadi Petrified Forrest Cairo Egypt.
maadi-petrified-forest-cairo-6.jpg


But what is claimed to be the oldest forest in the world is in New York. Gilboa Fossil Forest

Gilboa.jpgGilboa 1.jpg

Actually when delving into it,further there are petrified forests all over the planet. What I always find the most perplexing of all about petrified big tree/logs is how they all look like they were sawn into pieces by a large chainsaw. You could fill a book with all the shit I don't know about stuff, but does this look natural to anybody? We collect petrified wood and we have some pieces that clearly have what we can only surmise are cut marks in the wood.
636577648282004834-Crystal-Forest-credit-NPS.jpgblack-forest1.jpgbosque-petrificado-jaramillo-480x210.jpglogs.jpgPetrified_Forest_National_Park_Arizona.jpgPetrifiedWoodLog.jpg
 

jd755

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Actually those bottom set of pictures don't look like trees at all to me anyways. They look exactly like furred up pipes. Or more accurately the inside of furred up pipes which has dried out and cracked in the fashion you show. What material the pipe was if it were a pipe I cannot tell but the furring was always bad on steel, lead and cast iron pipes in my experience with terracotta and plastics coming next.
 

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