The city of Duluth: how ancient is it?

KorbenDallas

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The other day YouTube suggested videos started playing a random video about some city I have never heard about before. The name of the city is Duluth, and it is a major port city in the US. It is the 2nd largest city on Lake Superior. More on the city of Duluth you can look up here.

duluth.jpg


And in 1719...
Lake_superior_1719.jpg

Source
Here are the phrases from the video which caught my attention:
  • Her harbor was soon the busiest in the United States outpacing even the port of New York.
  • Soon after the turn of the 20th century Duluth had more millionaires per capita than any city in America
  • If we had retained a lot of those buildings Duluth would look like Prague, or another European city.
Part I


Part II


Demolishing Duluth
Bulldozers are wiping them out this summer, one by one, those remnants of our rich past, those landmark structures that are - or were - all about who we are, who we used to be, and what it was that made our corner of the world special, unique a...
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The Lost Architecture of Duluth
VISIT SITE
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VISIT SITE

The Great Fire of 1918
The worst natural disaster in Minnesota history—over 450 dead, fifteen hundred square miles consumed, towns and villages burned flat—unfolded at a frightening pace, lasting less than fifteen hours from beginning to end. The fire began around midday on Saturday, October 12, 1918. By 3:00 a.m. on Sunday, all was over but the smoldering, the suffering, and the recovery.
  • What is often called simply the Cloquet Fire was really a host of fires, fifty or more, that combined in a single event. It had two major theaters, one called the Cloquet–Duluth Fire and the other the Moose Lake Fire.
  • The Cloquet–Duluth Fire began before noon on October 10 when a Great Northern locomotive set a small fire at Milepost 62 northwest of Cloquet. It smoldered for two days, then came alive when a cold front brought stiff winds and a steep drop in humidity. At about 1:30 p.m. this fire began to move and join with others.
Burned out ruins of the Northland Country Club in Lakeside.jpg

Duluthians explore the burned out ruins of the Northland Country Club in Lakeside.
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KD: I do not know anything about this Duluth City (my wife thought I said "Deluge City" at first). I just find it interesting that our Great Lakes cities have something about them... something suggesting that they could be a bit older than we are lead to believe.
You know something is up when your 19th century Post Office looks like the one below, and not like this.

 

anotherlayer

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  • Soon after the turn of the 20th century Duluth had more millionaires per capita than any city in America
Hmmm... how many cities do they say that about?

- Jim Thorpe, PA: In the 1880s, Mauch Chunk had the most millionaires per capita of any city in the United States.

- Buffalo, NY: “In 1901, Buffalo had 60 millionaires, more per capita than any city in the US.
 

AnthroposRex

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Hmmm... how many cities do they say that about?

- Jim Thorpe, PA: In the 1880s, Mauch Chunk had the most millionaires per capita of any city in the United States.

- Buffalo, NY: “In 1901, Buffalo had 60 millionaires, more per capita than any city in the US.
This does seem odd. Almost like the go to public explanation for inexplicable infrastructure is that some millionaire benefactor was responsible. The larger the city the more millionaires they would need to account for.
 

Timeshifter

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These fires!!!! Ahhhhhhgggg!

This destruction shenanegans was continuing well into the 1990s (outside of fake wars)

How many other places have been wiped we are yet to discover?

The 1st video mentions a creek with lagoons running into the centre, sounds like an expo to me!

:unsure:
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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An interesting city it is.
  • The great cities of Europe are often known for what goes on below their streets as above—the London Underground, the vaults of Edinburgh, the catacombs of Paris. Duluth has its own subterranean features, though they are much less on the minds of its people.
  • The Tunnels of Subterranean Duluth
903BC351-65B4-4331-861D-187FD7E7BA9C.jpeg

Under West Duluth in the Millers Creek tunnel.
 

Timeshifter

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An interesting city it is.
  • The great cities of Europe are often known for what goes on below their streets as above—the London Underground, the vaults of Edinburgh, the catacombs of Paris. Duluth has its own subterranean features, though they are much less on the minds of its people.
  • The Tunnels of Subterranean Duluth
View attachment 26746
Under West Duluth in
the Millers Creek tunnel.​
Exactly like the 'Victorian' tunnels throught the UK etc.

But the Europeans came to the USA after these?...

Imo these were all built way before any Victorian times.

Much more to learn here...
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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The estimated price tag to maintain the landmark Historic Old Central High School has grown to nearly $25 million.
No wonder they are demolishing these buildings left and right. Wish someone in a position of authority asked a question of how they were able to build these buildings by the thousands in the 19th century.
 

Firefly

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Another oddity is the Enger Tower.The official story is that it was built as a tribute to a furniture seller, Bert Enger.

Here is a stock photo
Enger-Tower-1960s-Gallagher.jpg


And one I took
IMG_0666.JPG


From the top of the tower:
IMG_0665.JPG

Kind of an odd tribute to a local businessman.
 
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SuperTrouper

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Wish someone in a position of authority asked a question of how they were able to build these buildings by the thousands in the 19th century.
As a side note, I've said to quite a few people recently, without sounding "conspiratorial" whatsoever, that it's a pity we don't build those magnificent buildings anymore. Then I asked them why they think this is the case. It's my new way of approaching the general community and making them switch their brains on without getting into deeper theories. I've been getting a pretty much uniform response that we've lost the skill to build them and that it would be too expensive.
 

anotherlayer

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As a side note, I've said to quite a few people recently, without sounding "conspiratorial" whatsoever, that it's a pity we don't build those magnificent buildings anymore. Then I asked them why they think this is the case. It's my new way of approaching the general community and making them switch their brains on without getting into deeper theories. I've been getting a pretty much uniform response that we've lost the skill to build them and that it would be too expensive.
"They" all seem to answer with the same thing. That it's because it was slave labor and cheap. Apparently around 1900 there were millions of slave workers who dug canals, built these buildings, built Expos, built monumental Post Offices. And they were at the same time, skilled to the teeth.

What a world...
 
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KorbenDallas

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This is the Great Pyramid building recipe... and then all the skilled slave workers disappeared.

Dug Out or Not?
duluth_14.jpg


Just Buildings
Park Terrace - Duluth, Minnesota 1891 (demolished 1936).jpg

Park Terrace - Duluth, Minnesota 1891 (demolished 1936)

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Duluth Incline
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duluth-incline-railway-1905.jpg1907-Duluth-Incline-Saloon.jpg

Beacon Hill Pavilion
The Crystal Palace Beacon Hill Pavilion.jpg

The pavilion and incline railway (left side) at the summit. The pavilion burned to the ground in May 1901.

1905
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Larger Image

What's this?
just curious
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WarningGuy

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This is the Great Pyramid building recipe... and then all the skilled slave workers disappeared.

Dug Out or Not?
View attachment 26783

Just Buildings
View attachment 26775
Park Terrace - Duluth, Minnesota 1891 (demolished 1936)

View attachment 26776
View attachment 26777

Duluth Incline
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View attachment 26780View attachment 26779

Beacon Hill Pavilion
View attachment 26782
The pavilion and incline railway (left side) at the summit. The pavilion burned to the ground in May 1901.

1905
View attachment 26784
Larger Image

What's this?
just curious
View attachment 26785
Looks like a large old style black and white television to me. but that can not be or can it ?
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Timeshifter

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Looks like a large old style black and white television to me. but that can not be or can it ?
View attachment 26788
My 1st thought too, large TV...

Also, more builder types who built in to mud and rock....

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Edit to add: Is this another ghost city 1898? Where are all the people? image taken round mid afternoon given shadows. Also, I have darkened the horizon to see what is in the washed out sky.
(Some things could be jpg artefact)

SHORPY-Duluth_Panorama_2.jpg


full size

1902, lots of people, similar time of day, again I have darkened the overexposed sky (Some things could be jpg artefact)



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Look at all of that electricity!

Source
 
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jd755

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Its advertising of some description. It's clearly sign written even forgiving the crappy low res image shorpy are using (its a large glass plate original which would pin sharp but we don't get to see those 'on the web').
Looking around at the immediate area it appears to be a dumping ground for broken carts, yes I know the out of time horse and cart again, but there it is, so my guess would be its from either the 'cab' end of some sort of horse drawn cart.
 

anotherlayer

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I thought Large vanity mirror, Early refrigerator or something, but can find nothing like that.
I see what could be a mirror image. The right vertical panel/side seems to be (air) vented. And that is definitely a "top" of some sort, yeah?

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This section of this photo is hilarious. So many poles...

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Baseball? One on one football?

baseball.jpg
 
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enochian

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Hey guys, not to derail but while reading this thread I was suddenly reminded of the little town of Peshtigo, WI, a few hundred miles east of Duluth, that happened to suffer a fire on the same day as the great Chicago fire back in 1871. I did a book report on this fire way back in elementary school and always found it interesting. I've only gotten to visit the town once but it has a very old 19th century feeling you get with some places out east.

Lots of mysteries hidden in Wisconsin!

"It burned approximately 1,200,000 acres (490,000 ha) and was the deadliest wildfire in American history, with the estimated deaths of around 1,500 people, and possibly as many as 2,500.
"Occurring on the same day as the more famous Great Chicago Fire, the Peshtigo fire has been largely forgotten"
 
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