Tartarian car parks

BrokenAgate

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In our modern cities, we have car parks and parking garages--above ground and subterranean--everywhere to accommodate the one billion cars that humanity puts on the roads every day. Parking spaces are precious commodities in our bigger cities, such that people have fights over them. Seriously. Just google "fight over parking spot," and you'll find loads of videos and articles of people beating each other up, and even getting killed, over parking space disputes. It's bizarre that people would ruin their, and other people's, lives over something so petty, but it happens all the time in the United States, and probably elsewhere, too. We are very possessive of our parking spaces, even when they aren't the only ones available. And with the number of vehicles increasing every day, that sad fact of life is bound to become worse.

So, what about the previous civilization, Tartaria or whatever you choose to call it? We don't seem to have examples of buildings designed exclusively for the parking of vehicles, or of vast car parks surrounding those enormous and beautiful buildings. They must have had vehicles of some sort, as we can see their tracks (called "cart ruts" by the mainstream penguins) all over the world. We've seen images of train tracks being excavated from many meters of dirt. Where were these vehicles stored when nobody was driving them? What were those huge, wide, vast roads for if not for the passage of loads of vehicles? People had to park them somewhere while they were shopping or working. Or have I simply missed something? Were all the parking areas covered up by mud, so we just can't see them at all?
 

Apollyon

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The cart ruts you're referring to are likely imprint fossils from huge ancient structures anything that drove around those things would have rusted away or been turned to stone and crumbled to dust a long time ago. If we're talking about the possibility of a relatively advanced"tartarian" civilization existing in the last few hundred years theres no reason to assume that they used cars The same way we do.
 

UnusualBean

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They parked along the sides and sometimes down the middles of those really wide streets, and there's also the possibility of public transportation (both above ground and below). The streets could've been really wide because they look better (form) and because it would help spread out traffic (function). Nowadays we don't seem to care about either of those things, so we make really narrow streets.
 

redtrx

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I don't think they had cars, or vehicles as we know them today. Take a look at Piranesi's Ichnographia Campus Martius:

18879

If you zoom in for full detail you can see that if this represents a "Tartarian" city, perhaps even a run-of-the-mill city of that age, then I don't see their urban planning being oriented around transportation at all, or at least not the transportation we have today (ie. personal vehicles necessitating road infrastructure). There are only a few main roads here, most of this city or campus seems rather open plan and looks like it would be a nightmare to navigate if they had cars and such. It is almost as if their cities were not like the commercial hubs we have today but more like gigantic city-sized university campuses. Perhaps this was a society that operated under a 'life is a classroom' guiding principle.

So maybe they had some public transport, like trams or something similar, and maybe they also had personal transport, but if so, their personal transport seems like it wasn't restricted to carefully planned and rigidly regulated streets, highways, parking garages etc.
 

UnusualBean

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I don't think they had cars, or vehicles as we know them today. Take a look at Piranesi's Ichnographia Campus Martius:
View attachment 18879

If you zoom in for full detail you can see that if this represents a "Tartarian" city, perhaps even a run-of-the-mill city of that age, then I don't see their urban planning being oriented around transportation at all, or at least not the transportation we have today (ie. personal vehicles necessitating road infrastructure). There are only a few main roads here, most of this city or campus seems rather open plan and looks like it would be a nightmare to navigate if they had cars and such. It is almost as if their cities were not like the commercial hubs we have today but more like gigantic city-sized university campuses. Perhaps this was a society that operated under a 'life is a classroom' guiding principle.

So maybe they had some public transport, like trams or something similar, and maybe they also had personal transport, but if so, their personal transport seems like it wasn't restricted to carefully planned and rigidly regulated streets, highways, parking garages etc.
That's Campus Martius in Rome, not Tartary. It had plenty of streets in it, but people most likely walked for the most part since the area was only 2km^2.
 

KorbenDallas

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I don't know, some of those 19th century streets in America were made to be pretty wide. The below photographs were made in the early 1900s, but the streets were made in the 19th century:
I know I have seen quite a few much older images / engravings with wide streets. Were those designed for horses?I don't know.

I believe theirs could have been the age of steam, and may be electricity. What cars? May be there ones... made in "single" numbers for demonstration purposes.

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Technological remnants?
 

redtrx

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That's Campus Martius in Rome, not Tartary. It had plenty of streets in it, but people most likely walked for the most part since the area was only 2km^2.
Hmm I didn't realise it was such a small area. However if this is indicative of the rest of Rome it seems like transport and associated infrastructure was organised quite differently than what we have in today's modern cities.

But I mean you say its Rome, but what was "Rome"? I thought it had been established (at least on these forums) that what we call "Ancient Rome" could well have survived till quite recently, which would imply a Tartary/Rome overlap. A lot of so-called Tartarian structures resemble Ancient Roman and Ancient Greek architecture, and often feature sculptures with people in togas etc. Or is the thinking that Rome existed up till a certain point in recent history but was later occupied (or seized) by the Tartarian culture? If so where are the Tartarian-specific structures, sculptures? Seems that Rome and Tartaria were part of the same entity. Either that or Tartarian stuff was targeted a whole lot more for demolition.
 

UnusualBean

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But I mean you say its Rome, but what was "Rome"? I thought it had been established (at least on these forums) that what we call "Ancient Rome" could well have survived till quite recently, which would imply a Tartary/Rome overlap. A lot of so-called Tartarian structures resemble Ancient Roman and Ancient Greek architecture, and often feature sculptures with people in togas etc. Or is the thinking that Rome existed up till a certain point in recent history but was later occupied (or seized) by the Tartarian culture? If so where are the Tartarian-specific structures, sculptures? Seems that Rome and Tartaria were part of the same entity. Either that or Tartarian stuff was targeted a whole lot more for demolition.
Different people have different ideas about that. Personally I think they were both influential but separate cultures of the time. We tend to have a very isolationist view of the past, but in an interconnected world prominent cultures influence each other very heavily. That's why today there are people in India wearing bluejeans and people in Italy drinking tea.

But that's off topic for this thread and I don't know how to bring it back around so :censored::whistle:
 

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