Tartaria mentioned in Freemason Manual

BeckyGurl

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i decided to read this to see what those crafty free masons are really about, and it was so fascinating I stayed up all night just to finish it! There is a wealth of information in this book: Kabbalah, gramaria, Gnostic teachings, religious dogma, but I honestly didn’t expect to find a mention of a Tartarian temple! There was no picture so I had to look for it and wouldn’t you know it, the location of the temple had been changed. But if Albert Pike, Grand PooBah and unwitting whistle blower of the Fraternal order of the Free Masons says it’s a Tartarian temple, I’m satisfied. Oh, and it looks like some liquefaction occurred..
Morals and Dogma: Chapter of Rose Croix: XVII. Knight of the East and West

0256A3CB-6A13-425E-B4B8-7CA9BC89FBD5.jpeg
 
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BeckyGurl

BeckyGurl

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Where is the reference to Tartaria?
Here you go

“All temples were originally open at the top, having for roof the sky. Twelve pillars described the belt of the zodiac. Whatever the number of the pillars, they were mystical everywhere. At Abury, the Druidic temple reproduced all the cycles by its columns. Around the temples of Chilminar in Persia, of Baalbec, and of Tukhti Schlomoh in Tartary, on the frontier of China, stood forty pillars. On each side of the temple at Pæstum were fourteen, recording the Egyptian cycle of the dark and light sides”
Morals and Dogma
chapter XIV
Grand Elect, Perfect and Sublime Mason
 

UnusualBean

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Here you go

“All temples were originally open at the top, having for roof the sky. Twelve pillars described the belt of the zodiac. Whatever the number of the pillars, they were mystical everywhere. At Abury, the Druidic temple reproduced all the cycles by its columns. Around the temples of Chilminar in Persia, of Baalbec, and of Tukhti Schlomoh in Tartary, on the frontier of China, stood forty pillars. On each side of the temple at Pæstum were fourteen, recording the Egyptian cycle of the dark and light sides”
Morals and Dogma
chapter XIV
Grand Elect, Perfect and Sublime Mason
Aha, thanks.

Not really sure what to make of the site (or sites), but this just shows yet again that Tartaria was considered a real place in the 19th century.
 

VoidTrancer

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How did you find the photo? Have you found pics of the other temples mentioned?
 
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BeckyGurl

BeckyGurl

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Aha, thanks.

Not really sure what to make of the site (or sites), but this just shows yet again that Tartaria was considered a real place in the 19th century.
It’s the only photo of the temple in existence, I couldn’t find another one...some of my friends on Facebook were wondering why it says cashmere on the photo, so we figured out it was Kashmir, by the China border. The book really is very interesting, and although Pike only mentions Tartary twice, the mystical aspects of Masonry make it worth reading.
 

0harris0

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It’s the only photo of the temple in existence
it's actually called Shankarachaya:
Shankaracharya Temple - Wikipedia

I was a bit dubious of it being the same temple as described, there's no sign of "40 columns" in this one!

So then, presumably, the photo with the writing on has a misattributed title? Wonder if there's any way to find the real "Tukhti Schlomoh"?!

***** UPDATE *****

just a minute of looking, could this be the 40-pillared temple as mentioned?
Kashmir Diary: Ruins of Ancient Temples of Awantipora
 
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Onthebit

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I just start to read this book Mosses and Lichens:
http://wgbis.ces.iisc.ernet.in/biodiversity/sahyadri_enews/newsletter/issue34/reports/mosseslichenspop00marsrich.pdf

and on page 20 what do my eyes see? Published by Doubleday in 1919

"The manna of the Israelites is supposed to have been a species of Lecanora (Lecanora esculenta). This lichen is plentiful in Algeria and Tartary, as well as in mountainous districts of other countries. It is its habit to grow and spread rapidly and, as it is loosely attached, it is often carried by the wind down the sides of mountains into the valley, where it is spoken of as " Rains of manna." Kirghiz Tartars eat it as "earth bread." "
 

whitewave

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"The manna of the Israelites is supposed to have been a species of Lecanora (Lecanora esculenta). This lichen is plentiful in Algeria and Tartary, as well as in mountainous districts of other countries. It is its habit to grow and spread rapidly and, as it is loosely attached, it is often carried by the wind down the sides of mountains into the valley, where it is spoken of as " Rains of manna." Kirghiz Tartars eat it as "earth bread." "
I wonder if there was a sufficient supply of this edible lichen available in the area to feed about 1 million people for 40 years?
 

Jim Duyer

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Something that might help is the history of the Goths. Jordanes, in his Getica, written in the mid-500s, wrote that the earliest migrating Goths sailed from Scandinavia under King Berig in three ships. One shipload settled near the Vistula (Estonia, then on to Poland and Russia). They then moved into an area along the southern coast of the Baltic Sea which was inhabited by the Rugians, and expelled them.
And then, according to Jordanes, they moved into the lands of the Scythians and joined with them. But he continues by explaining that there are two Scythias known to his people (the Goths) one in Scandinavia and the other near the land of Tartaria and heading towards the portions of West Tibet that are now part of China. I have a map, that I don't have at hand but will look up, and it shows the lands of Scythia located in northern Norway, which also ties in with the Scots claim to be from Scythia, since, with their red or brown hair they resemble a Germanic race, and all of this through their ancestry, among the Picts. It all seems to fit together.
 

welkyn

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... But he continues by explaining that there are two Scythias known to his people (the Goths) one in Scandinavia and the other near the land of Tartaria and heading towards the portions of West Tibet that are now part of China. I have a map, that I don't have at hand but will look up, and it shows the lands of Scythia located in northern Norway, which also ties in with the Scots claim to be from Scythia, since, with their red or brown hair they resemble a Germanic race, and all of this through their ancestry, among the Picts. It all seems to fit together.
I mentioned in another thread, but I'll put it here as well: the name "Scandinavia" literally comes from the old/proto-Norse for "Scyth Island". I have no doubt, given research into the older cultures to move through Europe, that there's a strong connection between what became the "Scythians" of more common renown, and both the "Scandinavian" and "Scottish" cultures that flourished in the north (no less the "Celts" of central Europe, and all cultures in between - Germans, Danes, Frisians, Britons, Cruthin/Irish, Balts, Slavs, and so on.

A little tidbit of information: Cu Chullain, the Irish warrior, is said to have travelled "to the isle of Scathach", where warrior women taught men the ways of combat. He learned from Scathach herself, the head warrior/matron of the island. Some sources maintain that Scathach is the same as the notoriously hard-to-pin-down Scota, foremother of the Scots, or that Scathach is a descendant of the same. Anyway, if one reads the story of Cu Chullain in a certain light, it becomes clear that the "isle of Scathach" is Scandinavia, or is in Scandinavia, and it's more likely a mountainous region rather than the western Isles of Scotland.

Also, a little note on manna: one of the interpretations is that manna corresponds to the clear, dew-like droplets produced by the ergot fungus, which contain an LSD-like compound. The idea is that they "manifest from the skies" on the grasses, appearing like dew, and that the Israelites of old would have taken this "manna" and processed it (in a way which has since been stricken from the record) to make their bread. Eventually, there's some reference to the secret of manna-processing being restricted to the priestly clasa: only the priests were allowed to process and distribute the manna after that point. This ties in with e.g. the sacrament, which is a wafer potentially made from ergot-infected grain, thereby having become an "LSD-lite" substance - thence the visionary, redemptive, "miraculous healing" aspect of its consumption. Of course, the production of the wafer is undertaken by the priests... Same idea as with the manna: spiritual experience is gifted from on high, not for mass consumption. Reminds me of Eleusis...
 

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