Sunken Forrest from 4500 years ago, UK

Timeshifter

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mmm, here's another unearthed ancient treasure, similar to this in Oregon, only this time in the UK.

The Ghost Forrest of Neskowin, Oregon


Sunken Forrest from 4500 years ago, UK

Storm Hannah uncovers mysterious sunken forest buried under peat and sand for 4,500 years


Cantrer-Gwaelod-1-getty.jpg

From this source: Mirror

'The forest of Borth in Wales was buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater but thick trunks and sprawling roots can be seen for the first time in thousands of years '

Oh really? Who decides on this thousands of years narrative? Who actually knows this was buried 4500 years ago? maybe it was because of this priestess?

'An ancient legend says that the forest was drowned because a priestess couldn't do her job' Snu


So here we have another storm uncovering a destroyed Forrest with petrified stumps.

It appears to the sole aim of storms these days is to help the mainstream cement the thousands of years narrative.

As you would expect, the stories are extremely poorly researched.

I am no expert, but some of these stumps appear to have been cut down?

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I don't have much to add at this point, I was hoping maybe some of the fab people of SH may live nearby and have more info?

:unsure:
 

Obertryn

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Pretty smooth cut. Prehistoric woodworkers?

"An ancient legend dictates that the land was drowned when a priestess called Mererid neglected her duties at the fairy well she was in charge of and allowed it to overflow."

Probably decided to skip work to go party with her girlfriends and missed the weather warning alarm.
 

Ice Nine

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Oh wow that's fantastic. If they are like the stumps in Oregon, they aren't petrified either.

Of course they had been cut down originally in one of our "go rounds" on Earth.
 

Jim Duyer

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mmm, here's another unearthed ancient treasure, similar to this in Oregon, only this time in the UK.

The Ghost Forrest of Neskowin, Oregon


Sunken Forrest from 4500 years ago, UK

Storm Hannah uncovers mysterious sunken forest buried under peat and sand for 4,500 years



From this source: Mirror

'The forest of Borth in Wales was buried under layers of peat, sand and saltwater but thick trunks and sprawling roots can be seen for the first time in thousands of years '

Oh really? Who decides on this thousands of years narrative? Who actually knows this was buried 4500 years ago? maybe it was because of this priestess?

'An ancient legend says that the forest was drowned because a priestess couldn't do her job' Snu


So here we have another storm uncovering a destroyed Forrest with petrified stumps.

It appears to the sole aim of storms these days is to help the mainstream cement the thousands of years narrative.

As you would expect, the stories are extremely poorly researched.

I am no expert, but some of these stumps appear to have been cut down?


I don't have much to add at this point, I was hoping maybe some of the fab people of SH may live nearby and have more info?

:unsure:
The locals have been telling the archaeologists about this area for longer than the science of archaeology actually existed, - and they kept calling the locals kooks. Although I disagree about the 4500 years ago dating - it was most probably from the same time period as Donnerland, or perhaps from 9.000 to 5.000 BC, or much earlier.
 

jd755

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Never seen these things despite holidaying in the bay two or three times in the seventies but they don't look like any tree stump I've ever seen. Wood in salt water does not last. Even trees such as mangroves do not linger long once dead.
It could be said that the sea buried them in mud and yet sea mud is the most biologically active of environments as evidenced by the colossal numbers of invertebrate and vertebrate life forms that live there, and that's just the ones 'we' know about. Much like soil we know next to bugger all about what's going on in mud.
So a gentle sea rise would kill the trees long before the water itself flooded over them as the land would salt up ahead of the inundation. A catastrophic sea rise would rip into and over the land forcing the top soil off and a large proportion of the subsoil knocking those nearest the sea 'off their feet' and then use the floating trees as battering rams in the waves. Waves suck just as effectively as they push so the soils unused to these actions would I feel fall easy victim to them.

I find it truly odd to see these things and no evidence whatsoever of a wall, a building, worked stone etc among them. Things much more likely to endure than wood in seawater or under the mud.
Driftwood does float about for a fair amount of time always sinking lower and lower into the water but once ashore it reveals just how brittle the sea and its organisms have made the wood.

As it seems wood can survive centuries under water/sand/mud as wooden ship disoveries suggest is possible why are so few ships discovered, surely they should litter the seabed in areas where sinkings were/are frequent, I must be getting more cynical as the days roll by as I truly am struggling to find any trustworthy source of information anywhere.
Yet there are tales of such things in fairly recent past as evidenced by this excellent 42 page pdf written in 1893. https://www.hslc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/46-3-Cox.pdf

Not that I have the slightest clue what the 'stumps' are in reality. And as ever this post is just my feelings on the yearly media 'revelation' they seem to run on 'slow news days'.
 
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Jim Duyer

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I find it truly odd to see these things and no evidence whatsoever of a wall, a building, worked stone etc among them.
Yes, but it is not that odd when you consider the source. Historically the Scandinavians, of whom we may suspect these people were related, did not, until recent times, make an runic marks on stone - only on wood. They also did not construct the type of works you speak of - they preferred to use wood and leather, and moved about quite a bit. So, no evidence is not proof of the lack of same, and I find it reasonable that they were related to the Doggerland folks.
 

Jim Duyer

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How exactly do we date these trees?
We physically drag a couple of archaeologists down there and make them look a bit deeper in the water. Even in Doggerland the artifacts are spaced quite a bit apart, and are usually discovered in the nets of fishermen, or oil exploration crews, and never from "scientists" who tend to stay away from ancient sites unless there is Greek or Roman pottery writing that they can read.
 

jd755

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How exactly do we date these trees?
Trees cannot be dated. Its that simple, to me always to me. The majority are living longer lives than a human does. Once the planter of a tree seed died everything anyone says about its age is hearsay.

By worked stone I wasn't referring to writing but worked to an unnatural shape.
I feel the current coastline of Britain is dynamic not static just like everywhere else on earth therefore its quite reasonable to me to see the great bays like the Wash, Cardigan and Morecambe as once upon a time being dry land or marshy land colonised by land flora and fauna including whatever humanity was knocking about. The sheer abundance of such places today is evidence of this for me, and as a slight aside the concreting and tarmacing of such places clear evidence of the 'controllers' in action.
Just a mile or so away from where this is typed what was once a nice sandy shallow bay is turning into dry land (it seems to be missing the marsh phase which is I suspect because there are no streams or rivers feeding the area being filled in) courtesy of a grass whose name I cannot recall, which is taking advantage of a change of some kind as there wasn't a blade of it there in the seventies, which uses its roots to trap the detritus of the sea and form tiny hummocks then fills in the gaps between.
Point being low lying land at the edge of the sea changes shape far quicker than we realise as most of us pay little attention to such things because it isn't an instant catastrophic process.

The mechanism which can change a sea level so effectively and yet so slowly that gives man time to chop the trees down or moves in effectively after logging out and doesn't go away again ergo wooded land floods and becomes shallow sea without rotting the tree stumps and completely covers them in the silt of the sea is not known, to me at least always to me.

Don't buy the Scandinavian connection myself as it sounds exactly the same reasoning for the teaching of French in British schools as the second language simply because they are "our nearest neighbours".
A Britain as the end of the continental peninsular is one thing when stood on Britain and looking across at Europe to say any particular people were here or not is not possible.

I also find it inconceivable that stone wouldn't feature in any society that found it abundant. It might not be worked in a currently recognisable way by our eyes, fair enough but stone can do things for humans wood and leather cannot so if they had the skills to use wood and leather for living then stone would not have been ignored.
But that's the mainstream for you they will not step outside what they have been taught when credibility in 'their community, the lifestyle, the pension, their lifelong beliefs are at stake.
 

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