Smithsonian Institution Building: hidden in plain sight!

Paracelsus

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It really shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone here that this is the building that The Smithsonian Institution is based out of.
Smithsonian Institution Building, The Castle

https://pin.it/4agji4a3ipthos
https://pin.it/yltvxhyi6wd7lh
https://pin.it/zuh2as5oi36edv
https://pin.it/ladl3jikxgbrky
https://pin.it/rcve7bj26gqlw7
https://pin.it/h23hj3q3shtu4q
https://pin.it/sbgzywu2jn7kq3
https://pin.it/4eahqstheeq5vz

How is that for some Tatarian architecture!?

Probably just a coincidence that the Parasites claimed squatter's rights on this particular structure.
 
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ScottFreeman

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from the article
"Over the years several reconstructions have taken place. The first followed a disastrous fire on January 24, 1865, which destroyed the upper story of the main segment and the north and south towers. "

There's that recurring pattern again.
 

trismegistus

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The Smithsonian Institution Building, popularly known as the "Castle," was designed by architect James Renwick, Jr.
James Renwick Jr:

James_Renwick,_Jr.gifren-lead.jpgrenwick 1.jpgrenwick 2.jpg

This is all supposed to be the same person? Also, if he was in his hey-day in his early years, why aren't there any paintings of him of him in his 20s and 30s?

Renwick was born into a wealthy and well-educated family. His mother, Margaret Brevoort, was from a wealthy and socially prominent New York family. His father, James Renwick, was an engineer, architect, and professor of natural philosophy at Columbia College, now Columbia University. His two brothers were also engineers. Renwick is buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York, with his wife and father.
I assume his two brothers were Henry and William, according to this alumni record. Like father, like sons I suppose.

EDIT: Tracing the Brevoort line back through geni.com shows that his family immigrated from the Netherlands in the 1600s. Their family owned most of the real estate that eventually became NYC. It is no wonder this kid had a silver spoon growing up, moreover the "claim" this bloodline has to real estate in the areas where his buildings were constructed.

Renwick was not formally trained as an architect. His ability and interest in building design were nurtured through his cultivated background, which granted him early exposure to travel, and through a broad cultural education that included architectural history. He learned the skills from his father. He studied engineering at Columbia, entering at age twelve and graduating in 1836. He received an M.A. three years later. On graduating, he took a position as structural engineer with the Erie Railroad and subsequently served as supervisor on the Croton Reservoir, acting as an assistant engineer on the Croton Aqueduct in New York City.
Engineering at Columbia at age 12? It also took him six years to graduate, and at 21 he was already working as a structural engineer. Yet somehow inbetween all of this he had the time to study and master Gothic Revival Architecture? He got his first commission at the age of 24 to design Grace Church...

ren-grace.jpg

GraceEpisPC1910.jpgGraceInt.jpg56-3651105-450px-gracechurchbroadway222.jpg

This ecclesiastic edifice was finished in 1846 and stood alongside Richard Upjohn’s Trinity Church as an outstanding example of Gothic Revival architecture. Grace is clad in Sing Sing marble and at the time of its construction stood out almost as a beacon at the bend in Broadway. Due to cost overages, the spire was originally constructed in wood, but was replaced with marble in 1883.
Not too shabby for a 24 year old with no prior experience...

Why was the wood replaced with marble? I guess to avoid things burning down, as they were so apt to do back then.

His whole existence seems fishy as hell to me, although if we follow the path of the buildings that are claimed to have been designed by him we can follow some more breadcrumb trails to Tartarian architecture.

St. Patrick's Cathedral, NYC

st patricks 3.jpgst patricks.jpg


Cavalry Church, NYC

Calvary-church_1_crop.jpgCalvary_postcard_c_1880_-_Copy_-_Copy.png

Another one of his churches that had the wooden spires torn down. Coincidence has now gone full blown :unsure:

Corcoran Art Gallery (now Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery), Washington DC

5170551289_b7c2b9e40e_b.jpgcorcoran.jpg026802pr.jpg


St. Bartholomew's Church, NYC

st barth.jpg

Apparently torn down at some point, couldn't really find much on it.

All Saints Roman Catholic Church, Harlem NYC

4892882783_a3ec6ae48d_b.jpgIMG_3371.jpg
 
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Paracelsus

Paracelsus

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James Renwick Jr:

View attachment 14896View attachment 14897View attachment 14898View attachment 14899

This is all supposed to be the same person? Also, if he was in his hey-day in his early years, why aren't there any paintings of him of him in his 20s and 30s?



I assume his two brothers were Henry and William, according to this alumni record. Like father, like sons I suppose.

EDIT: Tracing the Brevoort line back through geni.com shows that his family immigrated from the Netherlands in the 1600s. Their family owned most of the real estate that eventually became NYC. It is no wonder this kid had a silver spoon growing up, moreover the "claim" this bloodline has to real estate in the areas where his buildings were constructed.



Engineering at Columbia at age 12? It also took him six years to graduate, and at 21 he was already working as a structural engineer. Yet somehow inbetween all of this he had the time to study and master Gothic Revival Architecture? He got his first commission at the age of 24 to design Grace Church...

View attachment 14892
View attachment 14894View attachment 14895View attachment 14893



Not too shabby for a 24 year old with no prior experience...

Why was the wood replaced with marble? I guess to avoid things burning down, as they were so apt to do back then.

His whole existence seems fishy as hell to me, although if we follow the path of the buildings that are claimed to have been designed by him we can follow some more breadcrumb trails to Tartarian architecture.

St. Patrick's Cathedral, NYC

View attachment 14900View attachment 14901


Cavalry Church, NYC

View attachment 14909View attachment 14908

Another one of his churches that had the wooden spires torn down. Coincidence has now gone full blown :unsure:

Corcoran Art Gallery (now Smithsonian's Renwick Gallery), Washington DC

View attachment 14903View attachment 14904View attachment 14902


St. Bartholomew's Church, NYC

View attachment 14905

Apparently torn down at some point, couldn't really find much on it.

All Saints Roman Catholic Church, Harlem NYC

View attachment 14906View attachment 14907
Outstanding research!

Renwick couldn't have been responsible for all, or any of those structures quite possibly. The cathedrals are spectacular, and have the signature of Notre Dame, Dresden, or Chartres. These are undoubtedly Tatarian structures.
 
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GroundhogLfe

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Outstanding research!

Renwick couldn't have been responsible for all, or any of those structures quite possibly. The cathedrals are spectacular, and have the signature of Notre Dame, Dresden, or Chartres. These are undoubtedly Tatarian structures.
I concur, it's incredible research.

I'm just wondering the claim on OP and this post how people attribute the these Gothic architectures to that of the Tatarian / Tartarian. Wouldn't this fit more that of European like the French . The Taj Mahal was Tartarian and it's quite different from these splendours. Where does that association come from, I'd just like to know what I am missing.
 
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Paracelsus

Paracelsus

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I concur, it's incredible research.

I'm just wondering the claim on OP and this post how people attribute the these Gothic architectures to that of the Tatarian / Tartarian. Wouldn't this fit more that of European like the French . The Taj Mahal was Tartarian and it's quite different from these splendours. Where does that association come from, I'd just like to know what I am missing.
Feel free to check out my Pinterest board Grand Tatarian Architecture, there are close to 1000 photos there from all over the world. I have specific sections for ceilings, doorways, and especially statuary features. The Smithsonian "castle" is one of many buildings clearly displaying a "universal" architectural style present all over the world.

https://pin.it/jyx6ynpcioqhjw

Feel free to argue with me all you want. But after seeing about 300 pictures stretching from Angkor Wat to Seattle, WA you might change your mind.
 

GroundhogLfe

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Feel free to check out my Pinterest board Grand Tatarian Architecture, there are close to 1000 photos there from all over the world. I have specific sections for ceilings, doorways, and especially statuary features. The Smithsonian "castle" is one of many buildings clearly displaying a "universal" architectural style present all over the world.

https://pin.it/jyx6ynpcioqhjw

Feel free to argue with me all you want. But after seeing about 300 pictures stretching from Angkor Wat to Seattle, WA you might change your mind.
I was not really arguing, but just asking for where does the strong association come from to attribute this Gothic type of architecture to be of Tartarian origins. I think it is a serious question to make other people believers on this past Tartarian utopia that some are promoting.

If we are to go in to specifics of it we have at least a couple of contesting views we can look this from:

A) Similar type of architecture found all over the world - make assumption it is Tartarian based on what? Because it was filtered out of history?

B) Most of this type of architecture that has survived seems to be located in the eastern part of NA and Europe, which would fit better for "new France" or even the Spanish or Portuguese who were seafarers around the globe as well to fit the more global narrative - thinking of for example Portuguse Macao with this recurring problem presented by Trismegistus on Ruins of St.Paul.

I don't know, I want to find out and thanks for the link.
 
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Paracelsus

Paracelsus

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@GroundhogLfe,

Go through KD's Norumbega post:
Norumbega: Washington Monument and the Roman Empire

Or CyborgNinja's Columbian Exposition post:
The destruction of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago

America has (or had, now) its' fair share of stone structures. But, they had to be torn down because something that cyclopean can't exist next to something newer, yet significantly inferior in scope and execution. Now, I'm not saying the Tatarian Empire was a utopia. Maybe it was ruthlessly hierarchical like the ancient Vedic caste system.

Personally, I find it humorously ironic that the Smithsonian, the epicenter of archaeological dogmatism, orthodoxy and conspiracy ends up in what appears to be a Tatarian structure. THEY are literally inhabiting the very architectural history they are actively trying to suppress.
 

GroundhogLfe

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@GroundhogLfe,

Go through KD's Norumbega post:
Norumbega: Washington Monument and the Roman Empire

Or CyborgNinja's Columbian Exposition post:
The destruction of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago

America has (or had, now) its' fair share of stone structures. But, they had to be torn down because something that cyclopean can't exist next to something newer, yet significantly inferior in scope and execution. Now, I'm not saying the Tatarian Empire was a utopia. Maybe it was ruthlessly hierarchical like the ancient Vedic caste system.

Personally, I find it humorously ironic that the Smithsonian, the epicenter of archaeological dogmatism, orthodoxy and conspiracy ends up in what appears to be a Tatarian structure. THEY are literally inhabiting the very architectural history they are actively trying to suppress.
None of those threads make me a believer that these are of Tartarian origins and I am 100% sold on the idea that Columbian exposition was not what it was told for us to be about, but to destroy the building. I like both of those threads.

There are other reasonable options for these buildings being in existence as well than the Tartarian global empire but I'm not sold on any idea yet. This is why I'm trying to be inquisitive about them to find out when some in making a strong statement like that. To support the idea on the Tartarian architecture is that if the Portuguese were linked to the Native Americans then it could solidify that globalish Tartarian idea, them representing mostly the Sephardic "gyes" and the eastern traditional more asiatic ones coming from "Tartaria".

ps. I think the caste system still might exist to a degree, it's just hidden in plain sight. At least for me it's relatively easy to see how it might work. You're just not set upon them from birth yet and can rise out from the status of Pariah.
 

trismegistus

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There are other reasonable options for these buildings being in existence as well than the Tartarian global empire but I'm not sold on any idea yet.
FWIW I don't think any of the research I did necessarily proves a Tartarian connection, the Gothic revival architecture is different enough to where there are still some question marks though not totally out of the realm of possibility.

What I think I have proven though, is that there is something fishy about this architect. Anything that has his name on it is, in my mind, questionable in origin. It is a fallacy to assume that this means Tartarian, but at the very least it fits into the idea that our history is not what we are told. There are a few other conclusion you could draw from this anomaly.

1. These Gothic structures are not "revival" but actually were built in the time we are told Gothic architecture came about (12th-15th century, or the Fomenko equivalent as such).

2. Tartarian architecture had a Gothic phase, as tastes do change as civilizations evolve.

3. The base structures themselves are Tartarian, the Gothic flairs were added by this family.

Also, I think understanding why several of these buildings had the "wooden" spires removed at some point is key to understanding the origins of these beautiful works. If nothing else, its a stunning reminder of how much more we used to care about visual splendor and craftsmanship.
 

GroundhogLfe

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FWIW I don't think any of the research I did necessarily proves a Tartarian connection, the Gothic revival architecture is different enough to where there are still some question marks though not totally out of the realm of possibility.

What I think I have proven though, is that there is something fishy about this architect. Anything that has his name on it is, in my mind, questionable in origin. It is a fallacy to assume that this means Tartarian, but at the very least it fits into the idea that our history is not what we are told. There are a few other conclusion you could draw from this anomaly.

1. These Gothic structures are not "revival" but actually were built in the time we are told Gothic architecture came about (12th-15th century, or the Fomenko equivalent as such).

2. Tartarian architecture had a Gothic phase, as tastes do change as civilizations evolve.

3. The base structures themselves are Tartarian, the Gothic flairs were added by this family.

Also, I think understanding why several of these buildings had the "wooden" spires removed at some point is key to understanding the origins of these beautiful works. If nothing else, its a stunning reminder of how much more we used to care about visual splendor and craftsmanship.
Indeed, your research on this architect pretty much is another nail in the coffin on the history of falsehoods. What you brought up should be compelling enough even for some professional academics to start to dig deeper in to and find out that something is very much out of place here. Any speculation on Tartarian connections involved in that post would've just undermined it, so it was perfect as it was. Well done.

When I brought up the case from Macao as an example I simply meant that here's another gothic type of structure, this time apparently built by the Portuguese in the early 17th century that experienced a fire in the 19th century as a possible recurring theme in that time around the world. I also brought it up as a possible point that perhaps there were other sources for these buildings to be in existence than this Tartarian empire.

Here's a definition of Tartary from a 1688 published book that I have found interesting enough to perhaps make an own thread of it. It's one of the earliest ones I've read so far and most interesting.

tar1.jpgtar2.jpgtar3.jpgtar4.png
 
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trismegistus

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More James Renwick Jr findings (I will likely just keep adding to this thread as I come across more stuff):

Supervised the construction of the Union Fountain in NYC.

M3Y60301.jpg

New_York_Union_Square_1850.jpg


From Wiki
A fountain was built in the center of Union Square to receive water from the Croton Aqueduct, completed in 1842. In 1845, as the square finally began to fill with affluent houses, $116,000 was spent in paving the surrounding streets and planting the square, in part owing to the continued encouragement of Ruggles. The sole survivors of this early phase, though they have been much adapted and rebuilt, are a series of three- and four-story brick rowhouses, 862–866 Broadway, at the turn where Broadway exits the square at 17th Street. The Everett House on the corner of 17th Street and Fourth Avenue (built 1848, demolished 1908) was for decades one of the city's most fashionable hotels.[15]
No mention of his name on the Wiki as far as I can see.


Here's a juicy one:

James Renwick Jr is absolutely a Freemason (not that I wasn't suspecting it from the beginning).

Capture.JPG


I found another paper describing the event, I highly recommend you read through the entire article. Here is an excerpt from the prayer they gave at the ceremony.

masonic speech excerpt.JPG


I wonder which battle they are referring to. This is 1847, so the most likely candidate is the Mexican-American war I suppose.

They rolled out quite the red carpet for the opening of the Smithsonian, it seems.
 

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