Single photo: 1856 photo of Cologne Cathedral and 15th century crane

KorbenDallas

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This question is not directly related to the main object on the 1856 photograph, but rather to the 15th century crane you can see in the top left corner. Just ran into this photo, after playing with my other "crane" topics.

An 1856 photo of Cologne Cathedral, then unfinished,
with a 15th-century crane on south tower.

Rheinpanorama_1856_detail_Dom_1.jpg

Simple mathematics suggest that even if they mean 1499 for the 15th century, and the photograph was taken in 1856, the crane survived in the elements for at least 357 years.

Question: what was this 15th century crane made of to survive for 357 years in the "tall and proud" original position?

To put this into perspective, it's like if this crane would be standing today, after getting installed in 1661.
 

flameto

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I remember Randall Carlson talking about how cathedral-building ended suddenly at the end of the medieval warm period, with tools and materials left on site as if the builders just left. Maybe what's called the medieval warm period is incompletely understood and there was some event or catastrophe that happened then, with history being rewritten by the powerful and prepared in the ensuing confusion and trauma.
 

whitewave

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KD, you've stumbled upon the premise of the thread I'm trying to get organized enough to actually write/post. Between the monsoon season we're having here and school starting, I just can't seem to make the time to get it done.
 

dreamtime

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This is from a german newspaper:

But almost 90 years later, in 1410, all work was stopped after power struggles between the bourgeoisie striving for independence and the church burdened the social climate. At that time, the South Tower was only 56 metres high and thus two storeys high. The crane on the stump of the tower remained an involuntary landmark of the city for centuries.​
After the facade plans had been rediscovered surprisingly in Paris and Darmstadt, further construction could begin in 1842 with funds from the Prussian treasury - thanks to the art-loving King Friedrich Wilhelm IV - and the cathedral building association founded by Cologne citizens.​

One thing for sure, the church never disappoints with it's superb ability of rediscovering long-lost things.

Only institution I can see proactively burdening the social climate is the church. I doubt the building was in church-control during most of it's existence. I think that cabal slowly came to power in around 1700, and with the dissolution of the Papal States in the 1860s had succesfully managed to subvert most governments and no longer needed a directly controlled areas, except the Vatican City. But controlling the kings and rulers is one thing, controlling the populace is another.

Rebuilding the old architecture in line with Catholic ideology in the 18th and 19th Century was accompanied by some more esoteric variation of the following:

Beeldenstorm - Wikipedia
Iconoclasm - Wikipedia

Deconstructing the old technology and putting up religious symbols instead.

The first fotographs that were created in around 1850 show the last ruins of the previous cataclysm/war, and the attempts of the "new populace" to renovate the post-cataclysm buildings, and create a fantasy history out of thin air. The question arises what kind of truth made it necessary for the controlers to create a concorted, global effort of suppressing everything that humans believed in.
 
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whitewave

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That's a good question, dreamtime. It occurs to me that shame may be a reason for concealing truth, not from the current generation but, from future generations. Japans and Germany's version of WWII reads differently than America's. If there was some major war (and the 1200's did have most of the world fighting with massive casualties to name just one time period) and the world destroyed its civilizations, there may have been a concerted effort with collusion of the shamed survivors to conceal the horror and destruction they had unleashed. Swept it right under the rug.
 

Ice Nine

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@BStankman the World War two filminspector article and filmed footage was really fascinating and hard to watch, but I had to do it. My dad and many uncles and an Aunt were in World War II. All of them, except my Aunt were overseas fighting.

Holy Crud, what is that cathedral made out of.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Holy Crud, what is that cathedral made out of.
This is a very good question.

The German city of Cologne was bombed in 262 separate air raids by the Allies during World War II, all by the Royal Air Force (RAF) but for a single failed post-capture test of a guided missile by the United States Army Air Forces. A total of 34,711 long tons of bombs were dropped on the city by the RAF.

640px-Mass_bomber_raid_on_Cologne.jpg

Official British war art imagining a bombing raid on Cologne. The city's cathedral is clearly visible. It survived the war, despite being hit dozens of times by Allied bombs.
That US guided missile in the 1940s also sounds interesting... (only one though, lol)
 

whitewave

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Maybe that church is so old it's actually petrified. I'm to the point now, were any half-baked idea is sounding better than what what are supposed to believe about anything.
I'm hesitant to ascribe to any theory but am willing to keep an open mind. "Those who can believe in absurdities are capable of committing atrocities." (Which is the state the world is currently in and this site to trying to shake off).
 

wild heretic

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Nuremberg Chronicles come to the rescue here.

Written in 1493, we have an illustration of Cologne (Koeln) or "Clonia".


File:Nuremberg chronicles - colonia.png - Wikipedia

I noticed two things here:

1. Probable mud flood evidence along the front wall of the city. The ground looks too high for the archways.

2. The Cathedral is not the same style as today. Completely different architecture by the looks of it (not Gothic). The crane is also not the same as the one in the above photo from 1856 either.

I'm suspecting near complete rebuilds at different "stages" of history here.
 

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