Single Etching: 1836 The Stranger’s Gift (Christmas Eve)

anotherlayer

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Yes, I am a little late on this one, but it popped up again in my feed. So, nothing spectacular here but I do enjoy this etching. Here is the photo and description:

xmaseve1848.jpg

The first known image of a Christmas tree in America was published in 1836 in “The Stranger’s Gift” by Hermann ‘Bokum’ (see image from an original edition). The first time it was mentioned in a story was published in the 1836 edition of The Token and Atlantic Souvenir called, “New Year’s Day”, by Catherine Maria Sedgwick, where a German maid decorate’s her mistress’s tree. Both of the 1830s publications are observations of the German communities and households. Lifted from Buffalo Rising article.
I have no idea how they balanced those candles on the limbs. No way, just no way. Are they light bulbs? I mean, how do you place that many candles and not have the entire tree go up in flames within 2 minutes?

bvfloxmas.jpg

The Buffalo daily republic., December 29, 1848, Page 3, Image 3

“Beautiful Entertainment. – We have omitted to notice the Sabbath School Festival at the Unitarian church Christmas evening. The Commercial, of last evening, says: – It has seldom been our lot to witness any thing so joyous and beautiful as the Sabbath School Festival at the Unitarian Church, Christmas evening. The Christmas tree covered with light and with gifts – the delighted children – the happy parents, teachers and friends – all formed a group of rare interest. The singing by the children, admirably conducted by Mr. C. F. S. Tomas, was full of spirit and harmony of the heart as well as of sound. – In a brief address the Pastor gave a tongue to the emblems with which the room was filled: the evergreen – tho Christmas tree – the light – and carried the thought thro’ the signs to Christ, to Christianity, to immortality. An instructing part of the services was the presentation of a medal. A beautiful silver medal of ten dollars in value was given to the scholars of the school, by a gentleman of the Society…. Refreshments are then served to the children, and the gifts distributed from the tree.
Covered in light, eh? Hmpf.
 

Ice Nine

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They had candle holders that clipped onto a branch, my grandparents had some around when I was a kid. And yeah not safe at all, but they did have such things. this is an extremely small sampling of them. Some apparently just sort of sat on the branch.

Hey maybe we inadvertently have discovered why so many towns burned to the ground. :oops:

candle holders1.jpg

tree candle holders.jpeg
2013-12-06-ChristmasCandleHolderschristmasgiftsfromgermany-thumb.jpg
 

milhaus

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The etching is probably of an artificial/mechanical tree from the old world.
Then people started trying it with their primitive modern technology; candles and real trees they went out to cut down for no good reason. Or was it to change the landscape? whoops.
 
OP
anotherlayer

anotherlayer

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I just find it hard to believe that anyone in their right mind thought this was a brilliant idea putting candles on dying trees. But then again, I do dumb shit all the time. Ad nauseam.

Anyone wanna stick around and talk about the height of that door? It's huge!
 

Moriarty

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Yes, I am a little late on this one, but it popped up again in my feed. So, nothing spectacular here but I do enjoy this etching. Here is the photo and description:

View attachment 14539
The first known image of a Christmas tree in America was published in 1836 in “The Stranger’s Gift” by Hermann ‘Bokum’ (see image from an original edition). The first time it was mentioned in a story was published in the 1836 edition of The Token and Atlantic Souvenir called, “New Year’s Day”, by Catherine Maria Sedgwick, where a German maid decorate’s her mistress’s tree. Both of the 1830s publications are observations of the German communities and households. Lifted from Buffalo Rising article.
I have no idea how they balanced those candles on the limbs. No way, just no way. Are they light bulbs? I mean, how do you place that many candles and not have the entire tree go up in flames within 2 minutes?




Covered in light, eh? Hmpf.
Its a little known fact that christmas, as we tend to think of it today, with trees and decorations really came from Dickens imagination with A Christmas Carol. At the time of writing it christmas was not really celebrated and if it was it certainly had none of the trimmings we come to expect. He wrote it in 1843. It wasnt until about 10 years later that trees became a thing. Your photo is 1836
 

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