Reset: Catacombs of Paris, Mud Flood Victims and Unidentified Dead

KorbenDallas

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Note: There are currently seven billion people alive today and the Population Reference Bureau estimates that about 107 billion people have ever lived. This means that we are nowhere near close to having more alive than dead. In fact, there are 15 dead people for every person living.

This is one of the threads I wanted to put together for a very long time. A few months ago I offered the thread titled 16th century Paris: Size vs. Population. The below contents are some sort of a byproduct of the above mentioned thread, in conjunction with these two:
Any idea of a recent reset (or resets) poses a question of the missing dead. An idea of any Mud Flood related activities poses the same question. It does appear (to a certain degree) that Mud Floods could somehow be related to our possible resets. I do not insist, but this is the impression I have.

As far as Mud Floods go, two time periods stick out. I think these two periods could be traced with visual representations of the mud flooded architecture.

Mud Flood: Period #1
1600-1750
view-of-the-tomb-of-caius-cestius.jpg

Above is one of the Giovanni Battista Piranesi's works. He lived between 1720 and 1778. If we consider, that he did witness everything depicted in his works, it gives us a Mud Flood date of approximately 1600-1750. I'm pushing it to 1600's due to Piranesi being just one of the ruin artists (Capriccio) we have. Some earlier ones, like Alessandro Salucci (1590 – c. 1655-60), suggest that the events in question could have taken place as early as 1620's. I do not put too much faith into these dates being accurate, but they can serve as a guidon of sorts.

Pre-period #1 Dead
While questionable, I think Mr. G. B. Piranesi did provide us with a pretty good idea on how that specific spin of our civilization used to handle their dead. The illustration below should speak for itself. Based on the image, it does not appear that the dead were buried in the ground back then. For a thread pertaining to the below sketch you can visit:
piranesi_cemetery_1.jpg

I believe that in the above case we could be talking about burial grounds of the cremated Giants. The same Piranesi left us a few images, suggesting that the builders of the insane architecture were quite a bit larger than us.

If those were indeed the Giants, I doubt we would be allowed on this specific knowledge by the current narrative maintenance crew.

giants_piranesi_1.jpg


Mud Flood: Period #2
1840-1900
mud_flood_123.jpg

The reason I think there was a second Mud Flood (and possibly a reset) is due to some drastic architectural differences between the ones presented by the Ruin Artists (like Piranesi), and the 19th century buildings we can witness.

In general, timing these events is hard. On one hand I would like to place this second Mud Flood closer to 1850s, but this Russian building above was allegedly built in 1910s. It appears that we have some major time frame meddling involved, but this thread is not about our time frame issues. It's about the dead.

Old Cemeteries
If we go along with the traditional linear development narrative, we would expect to see thousands of very old cemeteries spread out throughout the world. Yet, it does not appear to be the case. As a matter of fact we are provided with 8 oldest cemeteries, which are:
  1. Gross Fredenwalde - c. 8,500 years ago
  2. Kerameikos - c.3000 BCE; first organized cemetery c.1200 BCE
  3. Udegram Cemetery - c. 2,500 – 3,000 years ago
  4. Mount of Olives Jewish Cemetery - c.3,000 years ago
  5. Okunoin Cemetery - c. 819 CE
  6. Heiliger Sand (Holy Sand) - c. 1058
  7. Old Jewish Cemetery in Prague - c. 1439
  8. Myles Standish Burial Ground - c. 1638
Now, I'm pretty sure that the above eight are just a set of older cemeteries somebody put together for the sole purpose of creating content for their website. Are there old cemeteries out there? There sure are, but once you start paying attention, you start noticing this interesting word: "DATED". My personal trust to the dated things is next to none.

Essentially it appears that we do not have any cemeteries older than 500 years old. For that you just have to approach this issue systematically.

For example, the City of London was officially established in 43 CE.
The city of Paris was established God knows when. It appears that it happened some time around 250-225 BCE.
Pick your own city with a very old history, and see how old their local cemeteries are. Also when you run into some 1500 year old graveyard, try to understand where the dates are coming from. In my opinion, those dates are just made up. Kind of similar to the below 2000 year old burial site, located 5 feet deep dead smack in the middle of the street in one of the Russian cities.
  • Yup, 2000 y.o. graves located 5 feet deep. In my opinion these are the Second Mud Flood victims. Of course, pseudo archaeologists know better, and this is claimed to be a Scythian/Meotian Necropolis.

Request: If whoever speaks Russian, could you please translate what the guy in this video is saying?


KD: It appears that we do not have any cemeteries out there to account for the dead as they relate to various historical time frames. Sure we could go with cremations, and some other modes of riddance of the dead bodies. At the same time we pay the due respect to our dead, and we have places to show for it. Why don't they?

It's up to the reader to decide whether our distant ancestors were ignorant enough to not pay proper respect to their dead loved ones.
  • For those forum members who live in some very old cities - what is the oldest cemetery in your neck of the woods?
Catacombs of Paris
6 million skeletons
Some 200 miles of labyrinthine tunnels are believed to exist. Despite the vast length of the tunneled, underground world, only a small section of it is open to the public. This tiny portion (under 1 mile), known as Denfert-Rochereau Ossuary, or more popularly, “The Catacombs,” has become one of the top tourist attractions in Paris.

catacombes-v4.jpg

I think that the story of the Catacombs of Paris is as suspicious as it gets, in reference to the number of dead people we are presented with.
  • Where could six million skeletons come from by 1780?
Let us look at the narrative compliant version of the issue at hand.


The Narrative: The Catacombs of Paris are underground ossuaries in Paris, France, which hold the remains of more than six million people in a small part of a tunnel network built to consolidate Paris' ancient stone mines. Extending south from the Barrière d'Enfer ("Gate of Hell") former city gate, this ossuary was created as part of the effort to eliminate the city's overflowing cemeteries. Preparation work began not long after a 1774 series of gruesome Saint Innocents-cemetery-quarter basement wall collapses added a sense of urgency to the cemetery-eliminating measure, and from 1786, nightly processions of covered wagons transferred remains from most of Paris' cemeteries to a mine shaft opened near the Rue de la Tombe-Issoire.

The ossuary remained largely forgotten until it became a novelty-place for concerts and other private events in the early 19th century; after further renovations and the construction of accesses around Place Denfert-Rochereau, it was open to public visitation from 1874. Since January 1, 2013, the Catacombs number among the 14 City of Paris Museums managed by Paris Musées. Although the ossuary comprises only a small section of the underground "carrières de Paris" ("quarries of Paris"), Parisians presently often refer to the entire tunnel network as the catacombs.

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Essentially what we have is an old, no longer existing cemetery called Holy Innocents' Cemetery. It got overfilled and the dead bodies spilled into the streets of Paris. Authorities had to act, and they allegedly did by moving skeletons to the catacombs.
  • Under the reign of Philip II (1180-1223) the cemetery was enlarged and surrounded by a three-meter-high wall. Les Innocents had begun as a cemetery with individual sepulchres, but by then had become a site for mass graves. People were buried together in the same pit (a pit could hold about 1,500 dead at a time); only when it was full would another be opened.
  • The Holy Innocents' Cemetery is a defunct cemetery in Paris that was used from the Middle Ages until the late 18th century. It was the oldest and largest cemetery in Paris and had often been used for mass graves. It was closed because of overuse in 1780, and in 1786 the remaining corpses were exhumed and transported to the unused subterranean quarries known as the Catacombs.
The below illustration allegedly pertaining to 1550s, was done by Theodor Josef Hubert Hoffbauer who was born in 1839 and died in 1922. This guy has a lot of works, but I was not able to find a single image of his face. Yet, the existence of this "Holy Innocents' Cemetery" is supported by his below painting. Nothing knew there, I'm afraid.

The Holy Innocents' Cemetery, c.1550.
1280px-Saints_Innocents_1550_Hoffbauer.jpg

Holy Innocents' Cemetery allegedly was established in 12th century and got closed in 1780. The dead were moved to the stone quarries below the streets of Paris. Today the quarries are known as the Catacombs of Paris. Did this "Holy Innocents' Cemetery" exist in reality? I do not know, but we sure do have a lot of skeletons in the Paris Catacombs.

Paris Population
First of all, I will refer to the thread titled: 16th century Paris: Size vs. Population. You judge for yourself whether 205,882 people per square mile in 1572 is a feasible number. The most populated city of today, which is Manila, has only 107,561 people per square mile. I personally thing that either these numbers are BS, or the true size of the city of Paris in the 16th century is not being revealed to us.

1572: 350,000 people in 1.69 sq mi
Munser_Paris_1572.jpg

For comparison, this 1878 San Francisco had approximately 230k people living there. The size of 1878 SF was no less than 20 sq. miles (today SF is ~49 sq. miles). @dreamtime says that 20-25k is a good number per square mile, when considering normal city occupancy. I do not know, and you will have to judge for yourself.

When considering 350,000 people per 1.69 square miles, one has to take the following into account:
KD: Basically, just like I said above, we are either not being told about the true size of the city, or the population of Paris in 1550s was under 50k. Barring the existence of 40 story skyscrapers, I do not know how it's possible to accommodate 350,000 people within 1.69 square miles. When we factor in that there was no known sewer system in place, the numbers sound even more ridiculous. It's not like Earth was overpopulated back then, right? At least officially it was not.

6,000,000 skeletons
where from?
Now, when we have the weird city population issue out of the way, let us talk about the alleged 6 million people who were transferred to the Paris Catacombs. The overwhelming majority was moved from the Holy Innocents' Cemetery, which existed from the 12th century to 1780. Let us take a look at the Paris population by year:
  • year 29BC: 29,000
  • year 1000: 20,000
  • year 1200: 110,000
  • year 1250: 160,000
  • year 1300: 228,000
  • year 1340: 300,000
  • year 1400: 280,000 - Losses of the Black Plague.
  • year 1500: 200,000 - Losses of the Hundred Years' War.
  • year 1550: 275,000 - Renaissance recovery.
  • year 1594: 210,000 - Losses of religious and civil wars.
  • year 1634: 420,000 - Spectacular recovery under King Henry IV and Richelieu.
  • year 1700: 515,000
  • year 1750: 565,000
You gotta love this "spectacular recovery", and "losses". What could be hiding behind these numbers shenanigans?

Once again: The Holy Innocents' Cemetery is a defunct cemetery in Paris that was used from the Middle Ages until the late 18th century. It was the oldest and largest cemetery in Paris and had often been used for mass graves. It was closed because of overuse in 1780, and in 1786 the remaining corpses were exhumed and transported to the unused subterranean quarries known as the Catacombs.
Think about it: Under the reign of Philip II (1180-1223) the cemetery was enlarged and surrounded by a three-meter-high wall.
  • Why in 1200s with tiny population of 110k, a 10 foot wall would be needed to surround the cemetery?
Holy Innocents' Cemetery.jpg

As you can see, the Cemetery is located smack dab in the middle of Paris. It's like if there was no available room anywhere else back then.

Guess where the alleged 50,000 victims of the 1347 Black Death go to? Yup, they got buried in the middle of Paris. Why they would keep all those Plague contaminated corpses in the middle of the populated city bits me. I thought those were transported outside of the city limits and covered with bleach or something. Our scientists say that plague-ridden corpses are no danger:
  • There's a common belief that dead bodies pose a major risk of disease, which leads to a lot of hysteria during major epidemics. This is mostly a myth, studies have found.
Question: Anyways, taking the above Paris population numbers into consideration, how do we get 6,000,000 dead people? Even if they had 250,000 people dying in Paris every 33 years for 500 years straight, we would only end up with 4,500,000.

Nice "lil" holes, aren't they?
skulls_1.jpg


Paris-Catacombes-21.jpg

From a slightly different perspective, we have well preserved, similar looking skeletal bones, and skulls. Some of the skeletons were supposed to be 500 years old, and some only 10 or so, yet they all look the same. It's like bones do not fall apart, when in reality they clearly do. Additionally, the skeletal remains displayed in the Paris Catacombs look polished and treated.

skulls_2.jpg

KD summary on the Paris: With this interesting Holy Innocents' Cemetery no longer in existence, I will allow myself the following set of speculations:
  • All these people died at the same time. This is why all the bones are in the same place and in a very similar condition.
  • The dead could represent a "reset". Whether they are Mud Flood related, or victims of some "plague" chemical attack remains to be determined.
  • With under 1 out of 200 miles of tunnels being available to public, we cannot be sure that we only have 6 millions of skeletons down there. What if the numbers are 200 times that?
  • We have no idea what exact time period these dead pertain to.
Inspection générale des carrières
The Inspection générale des carrières (IGC) is the organisation which administers, controls and maintains the mines of Paris and catacombs of Paris. It was founded by royal decree of Louis XVI on 4 April 1777 as the 'Service des carrières du département de la Seine'.

paris_quarries.jpg

Department of General Quarry Inspection, aka General Inspectorate of Quarries still exists, regardless of the above Wiki page only going to 1911.
  • There’s also the issue of contemporary maintenance because, although the Inspectorate still exists, it works in a very different way. Rather than preserve and reinforce the structure and integrity of the underground quarries as has been done for centuries – with additional limestone pillars and walls – today holes are drilled down from the surface and filled with concrete. Since the quarry networks were made forbidden to public access in the 1950s, I think historically, Parisians have wiped them from their memory.
Essentially, due to the danger posed by the cavities, allegedly created by the Ancient Romans, historical evidence is being filled up, and sealed with concrete. Nobody needs to see what's down there.

KD: What other 1775-1777 dates do we know? I don't think all this is a coincidence.

Other Places
Brno Ossuary
Brno Ossuary is an underground ossuary in Brno, Czech Republic. It was rediscovered in 2001 in the historical centre of the city, partially under the Church of St. James. It is estimated that the ossuary holds the remains of over 50,000 people which makes it the second-largest ossuary in Europe, after the Catacombs of Paris. The ossuary was founded in the 17th century, and was expanded in the 18th century. It's been opened to public since June 2012.

Brno Ossuary.jpg

Brno Ossuary - Wikipedia

Sedlec Ossuary
The 40,000 to 70,000 skeletons within Sedlec Ossuary (aka Kostnice Ossuary Beinhaus) in the Czech Republic welcome you, quite literally, with open arms.
The ossuary, a small, unassuming building of a clay-brown hue, was first erected in 1741. Tucked in a cemetery behind the town’s medieval St. Lawrence Church, it contains the skeletons of what are believed to be the remains of fallen soldiers from the War of the Austrian Succession (1740-48). Later, in 1829, a minister named Ondřej Zloch carefully laid out the collection of bones and skulls that you can still visit today.

putim_1.jpg

Putim Ossuary

Monastery of San Francisco Catacombs
Beneath the church at the Franciscan Monastery in Lima, Peru, there is an ossuary where the skulls and bones of an estimated 70,000 people are decoratively arranged. Long forgotten, the catacombs were rediscovered in 1943 and are believed to be connected via subterranean passageways to the cathedral and other local churches.

I could just keep on going, but need to save room. Catacomb/ossuary related:
"Ancient" mass graves. I did not specifically look, but here is a link:
Additional Instances
Archaeologists have made a spectacular find on Berlin's Schlossplatz: during excavations on the grounds of the former city palace, they have found the remains of thousands of people. The bones are now to bring insights into Berlin in the Middle Ages.

dead_missing_population.jpg

Original in German Language.​

The postcard below, which comes from the Burns Archive’s death-focused photography collection, shows three such soldiers standing on a 30-foot deep pile of skeletons at Colon Cemetery. At the time, the price of a grave at the cemetery, which was founded 22 years earlier, was $10 for five years. If, after this period, the family of the deceased didn’t pay up for the remains to stay buried longer, the skeleton would be dug up and its bones piled onto a big heap in the ever-growing boneyard.

1898
havana_cuba.jpg

Postcard from a Cuban Boneyard

Government Rules
I do not know what rules are in place in other countries, but here in the US we have this Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. By default, no other but Native American remains (bar crime scenes) could possibly be situated within the United States. Native they could be, but how did they die?
In the United States, when remains are located, everything is stopped. If those remains are deemed to have historical properties (not a crime scene), archaeologists move in, and do what they do. What do they do?

kd_separator.jpg

KD: Well, as usually, we have what we have, and we don't have what we don't have.
  • Where are the multiple old cemeteries which are supposed to be in great abundance. Where are the 1 century cemeteries as they pertain to some historically old cities?
  • Why only 0.4% of the Catacombs of Paris are available for public inspection? Sure there is a safety issue, but who's there to say that we do not have a billion people neatly stacked up along the passages?
  • How do we explain bizarre 6,000,000 Paris skeletons for the 1200-1780 period. How do we explain the state those skeletons are in?
  • Why the stone quarries allegedly excavated by the Ancient Romans started to all over sudden collapse? When were they really built?
  • What's up with this practice of placing the dead inside various catacombs? Did the involved authorities agree upon this common practice?
  • Why 1400 - 1634 time period in the life of Paris looks so strange, as far as population numbers are concerned?
  • Could these piled up skeletons be Mud Flood or Reset related?
Pretty sure the questions could be numerous. Above are just some of the ones I have. Feel free to voice your opinion.
 

whitewave

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I had posted several links to mass graves before but this is much more thorough. I've seen those ossuaries depicted before but I always wondered why the people bothered to decorate/build with human bones. It almost seems like a memorial of sorts....or a reminder.
 

jd755

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A couple of standouts for me alleged 6,000,000 skeletons how could a group of people count them all to arrive at this extraordinarily precise figure, the exact same figure allegedly killed in the German camps in the second world war.
There is no such thing as coincidence.

Any reference to population number is pure bullshit. It's derived 'from a series of factors which are used to arrive at a consensus' in simple English a bloody guess that fits the agenda currently in play.

With Paris it is inconceivable to me that the kids of Paris, the homeless of Paris, the druggies of Paris, the criminals of Paris be they the ones who hide behind the law or those who break it , urban explorer/photographer's are not using this underground resource and tales of such use do not seem to appear in the English speaking internet.

It's been my experience that the easiest way to lie about anything is to over egg the size of it be it something physical or something intangible.

I have yet to walk into a rock or sand/gravel quarry that doesn't have water in the bottom of it. The quarrying operation leaves a giant cup behind that fills with water so in that case if the below ground remains of a quarry are real then Paris is built over a giant pond or a series of ponds. The Eiffel Tower may well have a part to play in whatever is really underground even if its a pond of water over whatever was quarried out.

The mud flood 'thing' that doesn't seem to be looked into is where does the mud come from?
Up out of the earth, down from the firmament, washed in by Tsunami, quick melting glacier/icecaps, earth expansion, bound to be other guesses but other than the tales of the Tibetan plateau once being covered in water I have never come across any source for the mud.
Dry mud is reluctant to move.
Wet mud is even more reluctant to move. The mudflats around here are underwater/in the air twice a day as the tides wander in and out and the only bits that move are the surface inch or so as it gets rippled by the sea and the channels where the fresh water that flows off the land keeps its course through the mud when the tide is out open, but only until the tide comes back when it gently fills it back in a little with its wave motion over the flats so as the tide goes out the fresh water flow starts clearing mud again and its channel through the mud slowly changes in other words it is a dynamic exchange.
Storms churn up more and all the local streams after heavy rain carry mud down towards the sea only running clear again a couple of days later. This mud is dropped along the entire stream bed whenever the flow slows save the fast moving flow over gravel bottom shallows.

Liquid mud aka slurry is only to happy to move if some force get behind it or lets it out. There is liquid mud in the mudflats but it it bound in by wet mud so unless you were unlucky enough to try to walk across these 'pits' you wouldn't know it was there and only a trained eye, not mine, can tell where the liquid mud is.

Is there some unknown natural phenomenon kicking around this place on a cycle too long for humans to recall/notice?
 
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Red Bird

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These ossuaries seem to have a ritualistic aspect beyond mere burial (of unheard of numbers). That could’ve come later perhaps while gathering up the bone piles or something which is reminiscent of serial killers. Perhaps giant’s religion.

Giants were reportedly cannibals in many ancient tales (Enoch, natives, jackinthebeanstalk) especially after eating up all of land’s available supply (denuding of country side?). Perhaps these piles are left from dinner, like eating ribs.
Carrying this further, maybe whatever disaster was aimed at ridding the land of giants, which has been reported too. Would also explain the architecture and they seem to like tunneling.
Also the cone heads and giants of South America practiced tripanning (sp).

I reread this just now and thought- this WAY out there. I wouldn’t have thought of it except for the etching KD attached. However I am sure giants existed/exist and the knowledge of them has definitely been consistently hidden- just like in the etching. Also we know time/history has been hidden/changed so the disaster was too...
 
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ScottFreeman

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Here's what gets me about this whole idea of decoration with the bones of the dead. Where does that idea come from? Although I suppose there are some minimal number of peoples/tribes in the world that don't bury or preserve the dead I don't believe they are in the majority.

Not only did these people not keep the bodies in one piece, they dismembered them and mixed them up. This goes against all the old beliefs that we should mummify/preserve/bury/burn (respect in some way) the dead in preparation for their eventual return or afterlife. I could even understand a completely pragmatic outlook that reduced the bodies to usable substances like they might do with waste. Uric acid pills, calcium, methane gas...who knows. But, that's a far cry from having a job title/position that, for decades, removes the flesh from bones and cleans them for use. Do we hear about who this group was and what kind of counseling they received when they got off work? Then, instead of what we would think of as respect, they use them as 'art' and glorify in them? Some things you can look at and think this is 'Good'. I look at this and can't help but get an 'Evil' feeling.

That sounds like some creepy people in Hollywood and politics today, a 'death cult' frankly and I wonder if it isn't just an extension of the same, only now it's in our faces rather than below our feet.

I won't post pictures of it, if you're interested search Marina Abramovic
 

whitewave

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There may be another, more innocuous explanation, Scott Freeman. It may be that some disaster happened and everyone was wiped out. Newcomers moving into the area, long since demolished and seeing nothing but ruins and bones with no one to bury them made these memorials out of respect for the forgotten dead. With bones lying all over the place, who could know what bones belonged to what skull? A group memorial for a group disaster.

At least I'd prefer to think of it happening like that rather than assigned crews of flesh-strippers and bone sorters and a macabre population that idealized death. Unfortunately, it could also have happened exactly like you describe.
 

ScottFreeman

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There may be another, more innocuous explanation, Scott Freeman. It may be that some disaster happened and everyone was wiped out. Newcomers moving into the area, long since demolished and seeing nothing but ruins and bones with no one to bury them made these memorials out of respect for the forgotten dead. With bones lying all over the place, who could know what bones belonged to what skull? A group memorial for a group disaster.

At least I'd prefer to think of it happening like that rather than assigned crews of flesh-strippers and bone sorters and a macabre population that idealized death. Unfortunately, it could also have happened exactly like you describe.
You're right, I probably should give that idea more credence since I have no evidence either way. Something about it isn't right to me though. Step one when finding a ton of corpses or bones is to get them out of sight, to me. Step two, in what we think of as a civilized society, is to inter or put them to rest. There should be no step three. Who stayed down there playing with the bones to make the 'art'? I could see this being under New Orleans for some reason.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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New Orleans: I think once you start looking into stuff, there could be some suspicious burials just about anywhere. How do we know those were really slaves?
New York: Over a million people are buried in the city’s potter’s field on Hart Island. A New York Times investigation uncovers some of their stories and the failings of the system that put them there.
Plague Pits of London: Overcrowded, dirty and awash with sewage… it’s hardly surprising that the bubonic plague flourished in the crowded streets of London. Over 15% of London’s population was wiped out between 1665 and 1666 alone, or some 100,000 people in the space of two years. But where did all these bodies go?
The Reputed Plague Pits of London.jpg
 

whitewave

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I'm curious as to how those cemeteries are being handled.
"Shell will allow descendants to visit the cemeteries through scheduled visits." Not sure how anyone would know they are a descendant since 1) the cemetery itself wasn't even known about until recently, 2) there was only one headstone with a name on it, and 3) "It’s currently still agricultural land. It's not ideal for them to just drive back there any time they want."

If we quit building everytime we stumble across bones, we'll never build anything ever again. Especially if the earth is as old as we're told it is. The dead must be everywhere.
 

in cahoots

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You're right, I probably should give that idea more credence since I have no evidence either way. Something about it isn't right to me though. Step one when finding a ton of corpses or bones is to get them out of sight, to me. Step two, in what we think of as a civilized society, is to inter or put them to rest. There should be no step three. Who stayed down there playing with the bones to make the 'art'? I could see this being under New Orleans for some reason.
I agree with your intuition, Scott. Something about the aesthetic of presenting untold volumes of bones strikes me as a profound desecration. This is not how we honour the dead. I do know of cultures which wheel out their mummies annually - but those are identified with the specific people they used to be. I would hazard that all death rites are about recognizing the once-living person associated with the corpse. My gut tells me that the anonymization of the dead - just a bunch of nameless, ground-down, glorified stuff - we see in ossuaries is a boast, an expression of power, and blatantly evil.
 

jd755

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We are trained to think of the dead in terms of 'our time' given to us by our peers and current version of the church. To use these as a measure of what went before is easier than stepping out of the death is awful narrative, I for one was taught.
Having neighbours who are Sri Lankan one finds their training tells them dead in morning, mourned till evening, body burned, job done. Very different to my training.

These ossuaries of today are tourist attractions, call them what they are, are impossible to date anything about them, nor unless one steals a bone and has it tested is it possible to know for certain what looks like bone is actually bone.
Perhaps the dinosaur test could be done in that if the bones are behind barriers they are likely as fake as the dinosaur skeletons behind barriers.
Neither is there any way to know the artist, constructor, assembler of these places.
Their purpose other than the current tourist revenue could simply be to reinforce the narrative with something tangible or make people look in the wrong place for some reason.

We don't know what was the death ritual being practised when these people died, assuming they are bones not fakes. All we get is archaeological and religious mumbo jumbo dressed up as best guess.

There is a growing feeling within me there isn't as many people 'alive today' as the numbers we get sold suggest and it applies equally in the past times. Reading through Napoleons supposed military adventures it is clear that unless he had an underground store of hidden but trained soldiers and vast supply trains plus supplies he could not have done many of the things he is said to have done when he did.
Just another example of over egging a situation for a gain of some kind just like over egging the size of the current population pushes the global warming hysteria in many but not all people.

Another thing to consider is where are all the animal bones?
Unless everyone was a vegetarian or there was some now unknown use for animal bones these would far outnumber human remains and being bigger in most cases would last longer in ground or air and yet they do not appear to show up near these vast assemblages of supposed human bones.

It's a layer cake of deliberate and accidental obfuscation.
 
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Jef Demolder

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Some remarks
1) It would be useful to obtain a more exact estimation on the number of skeletons gathered in the catacombs. "Six million" is typical the kind of figures which is repeated over and over again without ever been checked, and most people have no idea of the practical implications connected to such high quantities. I think we cannot admit ourselves to build speculations on random figures.
2) The creepy exhibition has to be replaced in the catholic mentality of the end of the 18th and the whole 19th century. This exhibition was not meant as a treatment of the dead but as a lesson for the living. In the predication of the Church death was the ideal circumstance to bring the souls to reflexion about their remaining time and their own destiny, heaven or hell. It was the occasion to remind, "hodie mihi cras tibi" (today me, tomorrow you) or "sic transit gloria mundi" (this is how ends the glory of the world).

hodiemihi01.png
hodiemihi02.jpg
sictransit.jpg

3) As always, Korben Dallas, your are advancing the right questions, and most often I share your intuitions. I agree that there is a problem with ancient Paris (Lutetia) and its transition/transposition to modern Paris. Perhaps the approach by the catacombs and the ossuaries can be completed with other paths of research. a) Other apects of the 300 km underground galleries in Paris. b) Photographs of the building of the métro, where it appears that existing ancient galleries were used to build the subway. c) I heard that catacombs also exist outside Paris in Ile de France, but could not find information on that. d) The poverty of Romain remains in the regio. Or, does ancient Lutetia somehow appears in the still existing classical architecture of Paris, even when it is said to be neo-classical? e) The study of ancient municipalities outside the "historical" Paris, like La Chapelle and Saint-Denis in the north of Paris, to find out if ancient Paris was bigger than we think.
 

rafalnowicki

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Those people were obviously cooked and eaten. Official history is telling about eating humans quite a lot: Human cannibalism. I think this subject is so upsetting most countries decided to hide or wipe out such events from their history and bury any traces of it really deep. Looks like French "cooking and eating humans" industry were so wide and strong they couldn't hide it. So they decided to twist their history and made up the French Revolution.

This story is so politically colorized and so idealistic that it's simply unbelievable. I found this in French library. The title says "The ultimate of Cannibalism" and the notes "This is the policy of Napoleon, a true despot in the Oriental way, establishing his dominion over corpses. The Duke of Enghien is lying dead at his feet".

Description: Collection numérique : Collection De Vinck (histoire de France, 1770-1871). The only explanation of huge amounts of corpses can be explained by Cannibalism in France were run by the government. I suspect this war was started because of starvation. War captives were a solution for big hunger. Time passed and nobody would like to return to those shameful history facts so they invented "The Revolution" with some high ideas like "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" bullshit.

«Le_Nec_plus_ultra_du_[...]_btv1b6940740w_1.jpeg
 

Plissken

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An eagle holding two thunderbolts of the god with lightening coming out of the weapons. He's destroying a city. It looks like it is on fire and that there is mud or water flowing into the city. 😲

«Le_Nec_plus_ultra_du_[...]_btv1b6940740w_1.jpeg

Good find @rafalnowicki. I am unsure about the cannibal narrative but like everything with the official narrative, it bears looking into.

I will be taking the detail of this eagle over to International Electrical Exhibition, where we were talking about this symbol == so as not to derail the post.

Check out the flag too!

Plissken 🐍
 
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Red Bird

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While the cap now is said to represent liberty in France it’s meaning was barbarians- and we’ve seen it elsewhere
Phrygian cap - Wikipedia

Plus
The Phrygian cap reappears in figures related to the first to fourth century religion Mithraism. This astrology-centric Roman mystery cult (cultus) projected itself with pseudo-Oriental trappings (known as perserie in scholarship) in order to distinguish itself from both traditional Roman religion and from the other mystery cults. In the artwork of the cult (e.g. in the so-called "tauroctony" cult images), the figures of the god Mithras as well as those of his helpers Cautes and Cautopates are routinely depicted with a Phrygian cap. The function of the Phrygian cap in the cult are unknown, but it is conventionally identified as an accessory of its perserie.
 

wild heretic

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Another good point. I've seen skulls, femurs and other long bones of the legs and arms but where are the rest? The sternum, pelvis and scapula aren't small.

I wonder if this points to cannibalism due to starvation as the next poster points out? Limbs are eaten. Not sure about the head. The chest bones have to be somewhere though. Also explains the lack of animal bones as these had been already eaten. As someone has already noticed the holes in the head which denotes violence, possibly pointing to cannibalism as well.

Even the official narrative points to starvation due to the harsh winter of 1788 as the cause of the French revolution. Other clues are the pristine condition of the bones with no flesh which points to cooking, unless the bones had been dug up from a century or two past and dumped in the catacombs.

Another clue is the date.
Preparation work began not long after a 1774 series of gruesome Saint Innocents-cemetery-quarter basement wall collapses added a sense of urgency to the cemetery-eliminating measure, and from 1786, nightly processions of covered wagons transferred remains from most of Paris' cemeteries to a mine shaft opened near the Rue de la Tombe-Issoire.
What's the bets that the 1770s and 1780s were continually periods of harsh winters, summers and starvation, which culminated in the ultimate breakdown of society. Unlike the Irish, the French aren't known to take shit sitting down (the Irish leave, the French fight). I'm thinking then the bones are fresh from these two decades. It may have continued for even longer into the very early 19th century... Napoleonic wars etc.

Well look at that...
It was during the extremely cold winter of 1794-1795 where even the Thames River froze over and temperatures reached -6 (21c). A deep freeze began on December 20th, 1794, and continued until February 7th, 1795. Even when the thaw came, this resulted in major flooding of the rivers which devastated the surrounding farmlands. The weather resulted in a great famine.
Food Riots of 1795 Due to Climate Change | Armstrong Economics


Dates also match the expansion of the Pacific Ocean in 1771 and the subsequent 1811/12 New Madrid shocks. The Earth always seems to cool after an expansion. Sorry about keep the research into the Pacific Ocean to myself as I am writing a book on it. All be revealed on youtube when the time comes.
 

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