Request: South American Philippopolis-city. Any info?

KorbenDallas

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This investigative request is originated based on the below thread:
The city of Philippopolis can be observed on this 1597 Map of the Antarctic region. To be exact the city is located on the southern coast of South America.
Geographical description:
  • Two maps on one sheet of the Straits of Magellan and the unknown Southern Continent. Chica sive Patagoniun Regio depicts the Magellan strait and Australis Terre Pars [Tierra del Fuego], while the south polar view shows Terra Australis with Beach, Lucach and Maletur. Nova Guinea separated from Terra Australis. Includes the Spanish town of "Philippopolis" and "C. della Victoria" is noted at the point where Magellan entered the Pacific.
Needed: Any information pertaining to this 1597 South American city of Philippopolis.
 

Bear Claw

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The Spanish Lake - OAPEN

If you go to page 277 in here it suggests that Philippopolis may be more commonly known as Sarmiento. It may have been a colony, set up by Magellan.

Edit - it appears that Sarmiento set up the colony at Philippopolis as opposed to being an alternative name. There are loose references to giants, gold, a dream of a city, a reality of wretched colonists, an Indian called Tupac. Not much detail but plenty of fill around the edges.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Appreciate the PDF. The reading is definitely interesting. Unfortunately brings not too much light on this Philippopolis.

Wondering what Philip this city was named after.
 

BStankman

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The old standby mentions a Philip-stadt on the straights.
/page/650

Captain Thomas Candish following Sir Francis Drake eight years after, found near a Creek within the City Philip-stadt, built there by the Spaniards, to secure the Pas∣sage out of the Northern to the Southern Ocean for themselves; to which purpose they held four hundred Men in Garrison in the said City, which lying near a plea∣sant Wood, was defended by four Bulwarks, each fortifi'd with a Brass Gun: But the Spaniards not being able to endure the Cold, nor get in their Harvest, which was continually spoil'd by the Natives, were so pinch'd with Hunger, that after three years stay many of them dy'd in their Houses, which caus'd a filthy Stink, and consequently a vile Distemper, not unlike the Small-pox; at last twenty three of them, amongst whom were two Women, judg'd it convenient to bury their great Guns, and march away with their Musquets; a whole Year they travell'd in great want, feeding on the Leaves of Trees, wild Roots, and Fowls which they now and then kill'd; at last they resolv'd to travel by Land to Rio de la Plata, but never any news was heard what became of them, onely one Spaniard, call'd Ferdi∣nand, being stray'd from the rest, was taken by Candish, to whom he gave the fore∣mention'd Relation. Candish entring Philip-stadt, found a Gibbet, on which hung a Malefactor in Chains, a Church, the Houses full of famish'd Bodies, and four Brass Guns, which he digg'd out of the Ground. From hence he ran to a fresh∣water River (which disembogues into the Straights,) whose Banks are inhabited by cruel Cannibals, and the Countrey all about plain Pasture Grounds, whereas most part of the Shore in the Straights is very mountainous. Candish Landing, found Spanish Knives and Stilletto's amongst the Man-eaters, and lay a whole Moneth at Anchor in the western Mouth of Magellanica, by reason of great Storms, feeding on Mussles, Cockles, and Fowl; and from thence Sail'd about the World, returning home at last with a Booty of twenty Tun of Gold.
 

Jim Duyer

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This investigative request is originated based on the below thread:
The city of Philippopolis can be observed on this 1597 Map of the Antarctic region. To be exact the city is located on the southern coast of South America.
Geographical description:
  • Two maps on one sheet of the Straits of Magellan and the unknown Southern Continent. Chica sive Patagoniun Regio depicts the Magellan strait and Australis Terre Pars [Tierra del Fuego], while the south polar view shows Terra Australis with Beach, Lucach and Maletur. Nova Guinea separated from Terra Australis. Includes the Spanish town of "Philippopolis" and "C. della Victoria" is noted at the point where Magellan entered the Pacific.
Needed: Any information pertaining to this 1597 South American city of Philippopolis.
On the left of the map, where it says Pata, is the area where the Patagonian Giants were reported by the early Spanish explorers. There are some drawings of them still up on Wiki if I am not mistaken. A Greek name in South America is a bit strange. Magellan was Portuguese, but perhaps one of his crew was from Bulgaria, where the ancient Thracian city of Philippopolis was located. Greeks often crewed on the ships of other countries, as did the Basque; both for the simple reason that they were avid sailors by birth. Portuguese probably did not get along well with the Basque sailors due to the intense competition in discoveries of the New World (25% of the crew of Columbus's first voyage were Basque, and his Jewish-Converso second wife was Basque, and her father provided Columbus with his ship).
 

BStankman

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Magellan was Portuguese, but perhaps one of his crew was from Bulgaria, where the ancient Thracian city of Philippopolis was located.
Makes sense to me.
A city named after Phillip II of Macedonia. The father of Alexander who also has cities everywhere.

Alexander depicted in Pompeii circa 1600.

Alexander_the_Great_mosaic.jpg

Under control of the ottoman's.
Were the Turks smoking tobacco in their hookahs prior to 1492?

1683ottoman1600.jpg
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Alexander’s father lived almost 2 thousand years prior. Based on the narrative, the naming individual barely had a chance to know who Philip was. It would only make sense if the two were not separated by that long.
 

Mabzynn

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side note - Is that C. 11,000 Virginum really marking the location of 11,000 virgins? I thought Saint Ursula was in Cologne.

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From wiki: Her legendary status comes from a medieval story[5] that she was a princess who, at the request of her father King Dionotus of Dumnonia in south-west Britain, set sail along with 11,000 virginal handmaidens to join her future husband, the pagan governor Conan Meriadoc of Armorica. After a miraculous storm brought them over the sea in a single day to a Gaulish port, Ursula declared that before her marriage she would undertake a pan-European pilgrimage. She headed for Rome with her followers and persuaded the Pope, Cyriacus (unknown in the pontifical records, though from late 384 AD there was a Pope Siricius), and Sulpicius, bishop of Ravenna, to join them. After setting out for Cologne, which was being besieged by Huns, all the virgins were beheaded in a massacre. The Huns' leader fatally shot Ursula with a bow and arrow in about 383 AD (the date varies).

Looks like "Conan Meriadoc" could have been a pagan governor in America.

Edit nevermind:
The source above The Spanish Lake - OAPEN states Magellan named it this after St. Ursula.


Anyway, here's more:

This guy then copied it:
Zuerner, Adam Friedrich (1680-1742).
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Changed this part and adds a part about Christopher Columbus in 1492.

Another:
Sanson, Guillaume (i668)
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La Terre et les Isles Magellaniques tirées des relations les plus récentes / par G. Sanson,... | Gallica

Duval, P. (Pierre), 1619-1682, cartographer.
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Carte vniverselle du commerce, c'est à dire carte hidrographique, où sont exactement decrites les costes des 4 parties du monde, avecque les routes pour la navigation des Indes occidentales et orientales

H. Jaillot, 1694.
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Nova orbis tabula, ad usum serenissimi Burgundiae Ducis

Contributor Names: Nolin, Jean Baptiste, 1648-1708.Bocquet, Nicolas François, -1716.
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Le globe terrestre représenté en deux plans-hémisphères : dressé sur la projection de Mr. de la Hyre de l'Académie Royale des Sciences, et sur plusieurs routiers et mémoires des plus habiles pilotes et savans voyageurs le tout rectifié et calculé selon les dernières observations, et dédié à Mgr. l'Abbé Bignon, conseiller d'état ordinaire

Contributor Names: Duval, P. (Pierre), 1619-1682. Berey, Nicolas, 1606-1665.
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The Spanish Lake - OAPEN

If you go to page 277 in here it suggests that Philippopolis may be more commonly known as Sarmiento. It may have been a colony, set up by Magellan.

Edit - it appears that Sarmiento set up the colony at Philippopolis as opposed to being an alternative name. There are loose references to giants, gold, a dream of a city, a reality of wretched colonists, an Indian called Tupac. Not much detail but plenty of fill around the edges.
The giants are here:
Contributor Names: Gutiérrez, Diego, active 1554-1569. Cock, Hieronymus, approximately 1510-1570.
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Americae sive qvartae orbis partis nova et exactissima descriptio


Duval, Pierre (1619-1683).
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Patagons. Peoples 10 feet tall
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La Magellanique avecque les Destroits de le Maire et de Brouwers / par P. Duval d'Abbeville | Gallica
It looks like the giants were killed off by the 1580's.

They are deceased, the greater the part of the vast size and to the highest Patagones 10 long feet. Le Maire, Jacob (1585-1616)
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Freti Magellanici ac novi freti vulgo Le Maire exactissima delineatio ([Reprod. en fac-sim.]) | Gallica

From Wiki: In March 1584 Sarmiento founded the Spanish settlement of Rey Don Felipe with around 300 settlers. Conditions were harsh and local vegetation sparse, and the settlers starved or froze to death. When the next English navigator, Thomas Cavendish, landed at the site in 1587, he found only ruins of the settlement. He renamed the place "Port Famine". In the 19th century, it was developed as a naval base used by the British Royal Navy. The name was subsequently translated into Spanish as Puerto Hambre or Puerto del Hambre, and these names are still in use.

According to archeological finds in the 1970s, the base established by Cavendish was located in the Bahía San Juan, just south of the Bahía San Blas where the Ciudad del Rey Felipe had been.

This area was influenced heavily by Sebalt de Weert a Dutch East India Company man:

From Wiki: During De Weert's time in the Magellan Straits there were some anthropologically noteworthy events that are associated with him. One instance of which is that De Weert and several crew claimed to have seen members of a “race of giants” while there. De Weert described a particular incident when he was with his men in boats rowing to an island in the Magellan Strait. The Dutch claimed to have seen seven odd-looking boats approaching with were full of naked giants. These giants supposedly had long hair and reddish-brown skin. The Dutch claim to have shot three of the giants dead with their muskets before the giants finally retreated to the shore. On the shore the giants were apparently able to uproot trees from the ground to protect themselves from the musket fire and they waited with spears and stones so they could attack the Dutch intruders should they make a beach head. In fear of the giants, the Dutch dared not land.

De Weert's claims to sightings of giants were not totally unusual for this region as Magellan also first recorded sighting them in 1520 in the straits at San Julian. It was also claimed that Magellan captured two male giants as specimens to return to Europe, but the giants died en route. These creatures were supposedly over three meters tall. Many others including Francis Drake, Pedro Sarmiento, Tome Hernandez, and Anthony Knyvet claimed to have seen giants in the Straits of Magellan with the last sighting have been at Cabo Virgines in 1764 by Commodore John “Foul Weather Jack” Byron. De Weert's expedition is the only one to have claimed to have witnessed aggressive behavior on behalf of the giants.

Also according to Theodore de Bry (1528–98) in Part IX of his landmark Historia Americae Sive Novi Orbis (History of American Grand Voyages), Sebald de Weert reported how his crew had captured and imprisoned a Tierra del Fuegan mother with two children on the south side of the Magellan route heading eastward. While they released the mother and the younger child, they carried the older daughter forward to Europe, where she soon died. De Weert noted that the mother had fed the children on raw birds, which was an oddity well noted in de Bry's work.

P. Famine appears on maps long before the 19th century. Someone should let Wiki know, but I'm assuming this is who stole the history of this region.
 
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KorbenDallas

KorbenDallas

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Awesome thank you. Quick search using your translation produced the following page which states:
  • The inscription in the extreme south of Patagonia, Arx, quam rex Philip. II. extrui curavit A° 1582 [The fortress that King Philip II cared to have built in the year1582], underlined Spanish claims to the region following Magellan’s voyage.
Now we need to figure out whether this fortress was ever built. For if he never did, than why do we have this Felippe with a city symbol on this 1684 map, which is over 100 years later.

Phelipe.png
 

Mabzynn

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Tough ask considering the geography changes that have happened in the region:

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None of the maps show these bodies of water on the Southern coast.

The area does have a monument where the Port Famine supposedly "replaced" Philip City here:
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I don't buy it. The location seems off and too far west compared to the other maps that show an island off the coast in between Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego.

I think it's closer to here:
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The whole area looks pretty devastated though:

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There's some symbols in the area that can be seen from above:

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And then lots of the area reminds me of those "Roman towns" being found in the UK the past few years:
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Then there's this... Maybe it's modern but who knows, decide for yourself:

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