Polar Freezers and the Global Warming

jd755

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My 'school atlas' and my grammar school 'geography' education had 'the continent of antarctica' as the 'fifth continent' and the arctic as a circular blob of white around the north pole of 'mainly sea ice'.
The atlas, which was far from new in 1972 the year it came to my notice, was done with the mercator projection.
 

whitewave

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The Arctic (public school education talking here) is supposed to be an actual land mass whereas the Antarctic is supposed to be one huge iceburg; no land under the ice. I wonder how they would know that unless it had been seen without ice in history's memory. Plus, there's all sorts of things supposedly being found in Antarctica that would had to have been floating buildings and such if there was no land mass for them to rest on.
 

BrokenAgate

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My memory might be similar to yours here, Onthebit. What I remember of the 'north pole' is an icy continent like Antarctica but at the top of the maps rather than the bottom. It was depicted like a land mass iirc, and not what we see now on maps (a seasonal melting and re-freezing of an ocean: the Arctic Ocean). It was smaller than Antarctica, but they still showed it on maps and globes as an ice cap at the top of the world. I believe it may have even had a name: "Arctica".
This is what I vaguely remember, too! I remember learning about the first white explorers to reach the North Pole and plant a flag there. It would be kinda silly to put a flag in a chunk of ice that's going to break up and melt every season, but that must be what happened. :-/
 
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