Petra: The melted city

OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
Most of the statues on display are victims of iconoclasm. Because they don't look like the Semitics that live there today.

View attachment 11960

But Nabataean art is clearly "Greco Roman" less than 400 years old.
Likely contemporary with Pompeii.

View attachment 11961 View attachment 11962View attachment 11963

Category:Petra Church - Wikimedia Commons
BStankman, I'm absolutely floored, no pun intended. That Church floor is like a lot of other Byzantine floors I've seen unearthed in many other places in the world
I did think the destroyed statues were iconoclasm, that has gone on so much in that region, so I never gave it much thought, except business as usual, somebody always has to destroy stuff, that's why we can't have nice things!

Anyway, if you hadn't said where this mosaic floor was I'd think I was looking at something unearthed in Great Britain or Rome, Greece, Pompeii, well just about anyplace other than Petra. I wonder if this isn't a "Roman" villa and not a church, there doesn't appear to be anything there that suggests religion to me.

Minoan mosaic floors. Oh shit oh dear, I'll be on this damn computer all day looking at mosaic floors now.

You are my hero for the day, I never would have imagined anything like this turning up in Petra, Jordan. Give me your address I'll send you a year's supply of Rice a Roni the San Francisco treat.

I see there are a few Dolphins represented, makes me think this was seafaring people and a woman with one exposed boob, I'm going to be looking for her on other floors.

Again Wowzer! thank you so much for showing us this.

Dolphin 1.jpgDolphin.jpg800px-Petra-Mosaic-2-2.jpg

Sometimes I'm pretty sure there was a group of survivors who spread out to habitable places and apparently took their most gifted mosaic floor artisans along with them.

I did some checking and the writing on the Petra mosaic floor looks Greek to me. (been waiting along time to work that into a conversation)the mosaic on the right is Greek writing. And it is from an ancient mosaic in Israel. and where this mosaic was found they talk about a Petra connection.

1600 year old church mosaic .

a snippet of the article mentioning Petra : Until the discovery of the mosaic this summer, it was unclear in which year Irenaeus was ordained as bishop of Tyre. According to the 2011 anthology, “Episcopal Elections in Late Antiquity,” a date of circa 445 is often given. However, since he was historically thought to be exiled along with Nestorius to Petra for 12 years in 436 — “along with two horses to carry their luggage” — the authors present a strong case for a later date.
Jordan-18C-116.jpg
Greek.jpg
 
Last edited:

BStankman

Well-known member
Messages
666
Reactions
3,245
I see there are a few Dolphins represented, makes me think this was seafaring people and a woman with one exposed boob, I'm going to be looking for her on other floors.
This really needs to be examined, because it breaks the history narrative.
Probably why they don't teach about Byzantium.

So many fishes, in the middle of a desert.

They say this is a church. Is this Moses? They are calling him the titan Okeanos.
Looks like Poseidon to me.

Okéanos-Mosaique-Petra-Jordanie.jpg

Who is this fisherman? Isseus, or one of his 10 Atlantean son kings.
Looks like a Phrygian cap. Son number 7 maybe?

Jordan1232.jpg

I would want to call this a temple, but I concede this is a church.
The altar has both Templar crosses and the Gamma cross.

Jordan-18C-115.jpg

Because is shows the same melted characteristics as the rest of Petra, I think it would be fair to conclude Petra was destroyed sometime after Jesus. Ice Nine date of after i436 seems reasonable.

@Ice Nine
You seem to be a fan of New Earth Sylvia. She says this "Greek" is actually almost modern Slavic.
It certainly isn't Latin writing.

If we take a leap of faith and accept she knows her own language, where did the northern sea people come from?

Slav.jpg

There is a big divide in the middle, but we could expect sea people to take the water route and not the land route.​
 
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
The Greek Titan Oceanus in the dessert, a man wearing a Phrygian cap and a woman who looks Minoan to me? and dolphins. and there are also a lot of animals I wouldn't associate with being dessert animals, there is always the possibility that this area was not a desert at the time of the original Petra and King Solomon, if there is a King Solomon connection.

I'm sure I've missed a few of Sylvie's videos, I didn't know what she said about this "Greek" being actually almost Slavic. I have to look into this more. I'm a big fan of her's, really first and foremost for all the places she has been and all the pictures she has complied on her website. She is one of my top go to places for being an arm chair history detective.

800px-Petra-Mosaic-2-2.jpg
 
Last edited:

wild heretic

Well-known member
Messages
156
Reactions
505
Petra is on this 1541 map and also on this 1570 one.

1541 AD
1541 petra.JPG

1570 AD
petra 1570.JPG

Not ruined it seems. The dots on the 1570 map denote town or city locations and the drawings of the city illustrate them.

This makes the most sense. The designs such as the ampitheatre etc. is very ephesus - esque and "Roman". This dates it to the pre-1580 AD earth expansion catastrophy which transformed the map of Ireland as well enabling the plantations etc.

What buried Petra? Volcanic ash? Maybe. But I'd bet on the mountain behind it liquifying and burying the city and then hardening after the event.
 
Last edited:
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
Petra was well known in ancient times, no doubt about that. I agree with your assessment, on the volcanic ash or soil liquefaction, it was buried for sure by something major.

I've been pouring over old engraving and pictures of Petra and found a great one with the statues still pretty much intact.i don't have the date for this one, Ill try to find it. The center statue is flanked by two winged figures, one of each side, and I see a cross that is usually called a Templar Cross on the figure on the left and I can barely see the cross on the other Angel, looked again at the enlargement. under this picture I have an enlargement to check out, i can see the other cross now. I gotta find this statue.
Found the artist

David Roberts prints 1842-49.


Petra (2).jpg

Click on this to see enlargement, you can enlarge it even more yourself.

Petra.jpeg

and now another thing I have never seen before at Petra??
The first sepia tone is an original 1925 photogravure of a sculptural detail of an ancient rock tomb at Petra, Jordan and the other one is Ed Der Looms 1935. these are the only 2 pictures of this anywhere. And I have never seen them before either. What is this and where was it, because it's not there now.

Petra 1925.jpgEd Der Looms print 1935.jpg
 
Last edited:

dreamtime

Well-known member
Messages
589
Reactions
3,230
The old paintings really make it obvious that the city of Petra was buried and petrified.

Some of the gigantic structures survived thanks to the mountain burying the city, because people came and dug some of them out. Look at the above image, and note that someone just cut through the "stone" to free the entry.

I don't think there is any reason to believe the city was somehow merged with a mountain originally, or even cut out of stone in any way. On the other hand, Petra means stone, so maybe the city was built around some natural stone structures.

It seems to me that when people came back to the city after the catastrophe most of the city was buried, destroyed or melted, but they managed to free some of the remaining parts from the surrounding material, which seems to have been some kind of solidified mud, before it became stone.

The small holes left and right almost look like the people who dug this out installed some kind of wooden ladder into the muddy stone.

Even though it's a mystery how this process happened exactly, I think it's the only valid conclusion: There isn't a single city on earth from pre-catastophic times that was built as a rock-cut city.
 
Last edited:
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
You make sense and that's how I see things, can't say for sure, but sometimes I think it was buried by mud flow and ash and then the walls by the Treasury, jeez they are so dark and smooth, like maybe they were blasted by a Direct Energy Weapon, that would have also made some of the rock face look melted as opposed to weathered. I'm talkin a hot blast of something.

A Petrified City but was it wood or rock to begin with, honestly this place is such a conundrum. I wonder when trying to deface statues at Petra if the vandals have an extra hard time trying to chip away at the rock. That is how it is at some of the petrified temples, impossible to destroy, and now of course nobody would be allowed to get a chisel near them. It's a buried city, just think of all the other cities unearthed, maybe what was covering them didn't get as hard as this, yet, but it's the same thing. More pressure, more time.

I have to go work in the yard.Drat! later
 

BStankman

Well-known member
Messages
666
Reactions
3,245
Last edited:
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
I was busy making a post...Jumpin Jehosaphat BStankman, :eek: that sucker is Huge, holy cow. OMG never in a million years would i have thought that was on top of the Monastery building. Sure makes you realize just how massively huge Petra is. Yep that's it, bigger than shit! :eek:

I've been busy, after my yard work, looking for Angels or Men with Wings and not finding anything like the figures on the top of the Treasury, but the wings are so similar to a pair of Angels in a cemetery in Butte Montana. One on each end and I must say in the realm for funerary statuary, these are spectacular. I like to go to old cemeteries.

Anyway, you can't imagine how jazzed I am about that tile floor in Petra and now finding those lovely old prints.

IMG_1255.JPGIMG_1257.JPG

and this has had more color added you can see a bit more details. wonder how many heads were on the Eagle in the middle over the bottom archway and man are those humans small compared to the doorway.

Petra color.jpg

Again OMG and the link you provided :eek: best pictures ever and so many close ups. Here it is again people, just amazing. Wonder if my husband would like a peanut butter sandwich for din din, I'm busy!

ancient-jordanian-site-of-petra

Oh look, then and now, David Robert's rock or as he called it an ancient watch tower and a pretty current picture.

David roberts rock 1.jpg

David robert's rock.JPG
 
Last edited:

dreamtime

Well-known member
Messages
589
Reactions
3,230
Petra - Le sette meraviglie del mondo - Tutt'Art@ (72).jpg

The world 3000 years ago according to archaeologists:

"Hey let's take 100,000 slaves and 200 years of time and carve stuff into rocks that completely emulates normal architecture, but instead of real houses everything is completely unusable, except for burying dead people. Meanwhile everyone else is living in tents because obviously society is very primitive and no one can build real houses because they are busy carving a simulation of high level architecture into rocks"
You make sense and that's how I see things, can't say for sure, but sometimes I think it was buried by mud flow and ash and then the walls by the Treasury, jeez they are so dark and smooth, like maybe they were blasted by a Direct Energy Weapon, that would have also made some of the rock face look melted as opposed to weathered. I'm talkin a hot blast of something.

A Petrified City but was it wood or rock to begin with, honestly this place is such a conundrum.
Petra certainly looks as if it was affected by a war of some sorts. But regarding the material, all of the ancient buildings appear to be a combination of plaster, cement and a bit of wood here and there, with possibly steel or iron added for stability. Also glass. Basically just like we build today, only in way higher quality.
 
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
Nice relief carving, all those photos! I have found a temple being excavated right now and it's the same deal as other "rock cut temples" but they don't even try to pretend it's being carved. I'll try to find it again. And also try not to derail Petra.

Yes wandering goat herders just picked up primitive tools and started carving these fabulous buildings. Fous s boat load of paintings same guy David roberts these are from 1846-1855. There are a few more on that link. I am struck by all the vegetation, among other things. He has some painting of Egypt too that are very nice.

David Roberts Petra

DR6.jpg

David robets 3.jpgDR 7.jpgDR4.jpgDR8.jpg
DR9.jpgDR11.jpgDR12.jpgexcavations eastern end of the city.jpg

here are some good weathering ones from that link with current pictures I don't know what is up with the last one, the first 3 look like water erosion, big time, the fourth "Tomb" sure has seen better days.

weathering3.jpgweathering.jpgweathering1.jpgweathering2.jpg
 

KorbenDallas

Negotiator
Messages
5,083
Reactions
21,143
Wanted to thank everyone for the contents of this very interesting thread.
Not ruined it seems. The dots on the 1570 map denote town or city locations and the drawings of the city illustrate them.

This makes the most sense. The designs such as the ampitheatre etc. is very ephesus - esque and "Roman". This dates it to the pre-1580 AD earth expansion catastrophy which transformed the map of Ireland as well enabling the plantations etc.

What buried Petra? Volcanic ash? Maybe. But I'd bet on the mountain behind it liquifying and burying the city and then hardening after the event.
Interesting. Never paid real attention to Petra on the Maps, though did see it a few time times while putting a thread on Sodom & Gomorrah together. May be Petra could be a good city for a map based article.

I like those official construction explanations :) ... just an abstract, but is still pretty telling of the official position. Funny how Wikipedia appears to be mum on the construction issue, unless I missed where it was mentioned in the Wiki Petra article.
  • Until now, no study has been made of the construction techniques of the Nabataean freestanding buildings and the rockcut monuments of Petra (built from the 1stcent. BC to the 2nd cent. AD). Their technical features were documented by fieldwork, and this evidence was then analysed to determine precisely when and why these features appeared or evolved. This leads to explaining how the Nabataeans developed their architecture, and what types of construction techniques they used to bring Petra’s architecture to its peak. The historical and geographical context for the architecture of Petra is presented, with a summary of previous scholarship on the site. The focus moves to the building materials used by the Nabataeans which are found to influence the construction techniques they developed. This is followed by a detailed discussion of quarrying and the rock-cut techniques. The procedures for dressing ashlar blocks and the facades of the rock-cut monuments are analysed to determine the tools used by the builders, as well as the lifting devices necessary for construction of the freestanding buildings. The technical aspects of the construction of walls, columns, floors, the anti-seismic and stabilising techniques developed by the Nabataeans are considered. Finally, the construction of roofs is examined in detail. The results of the study reveal the sources of the building techniques used at Petra and why they were further developed there. A few features of Edomite and other local architecture are seen in Nabataean architecture. The Nabataeans also used construction techniques found elsewhere in the Greco-Roman world. However, detailed examination shows that the Nabataeans were selective in which of these techniques they used and how they refined these to suit the properties of the locally available building materials, most notably sandstone. This also led to some technical features not found elsewhere, and others which are the earliest surviving examples. Consequently, it is shown that the Nabataeans had their own construction techniques, which are as distinctive as their architectural style.
How Petra was Built
 
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
@Korben Dallas, thanks for that, what a convoluted way of saying, 'We have no clue how they did this".

Regarding the two winged statues flanking the center piece of the Treasury building center piece, I have concluded they could be Saint Michael.

I feel sure they aren't Nike or Icarus. Saint Michael the Archangel fits the bill. Wings and a Cross on his robe instead of s shield.

Saint Michael.jpgSt michael 3.jpgSt michael 4.jpgSt Michael1.jpg

Petra.jpeg
 
Last edited:

wild heretic

Well-known member
Messages
156
Reactions
505
I really like the made out of wood theory posted here. Wiseup on youtube always bangs on about that and he's right. You can see the wood grain and then it looks to have been plastered over.

Dreamtime is on the money too IMO. That's exactly what it looks like when he says that they used something to take away the mud from the entrance of the "Treasury" building to get inside. Pretty obvious why as well.

Those holes at the side make it look like they used some kind of square U-shaped scaffolding with lots of wooden posts down the sides and rammed it into the entrance. They then backed it out probably uses ox, mules, horses etc. which took a whole wedge out of the mud infront of the treasury.

It looks like they only made the effort for this building. Well I suppose they didn't call it the "Treasury" for nothing lol. Look at the old maps again from 1541 and 1570. It says this region was the province or kingdom of Petrea or Bea Petrea. Therefore, it is very likely that Petra was the capitol where the administration resided. The treasury building was the "central bank" where all the gold and silver and jewels of the peoples and kingdom were kept.

Maybe survivors of the surrounding area tried to get their money back. Maybe there were no survivors and looters took it. The mud was fresh and soft though (not yet baked) so probably what was left of the kingdom tried to salvage what wealth they could so they could trade for supplies and start again. It's doubtful if anyone survived in Petra itself. Maybe in certain areas that didn't get buried completely. All the dead bodies will be mashed up deep under the now baked earth I would imagine.
Post automatically merged:

@Korben Dallas, thanks for that, what a convoluted way of saying, 'We have no clue how they did this".

Regarding the two winged statues flanking the center piece of the Treasury building center piece, I have concluded they could be Saint Michael.

I feel sure they aren't Nike or Icarus. Saint Michael the Archangel fits the bill. Wings and a Cross on his robe instead of s shield.



Very medieval. Those mappa Mundis often depict "angels" aka birdmen on their maps. I believe they are another hybrid of the "god creation" perhaps. Maybe made to serve man at the beginning of the new and latest age (early middle ages)?
 
Last edited:
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
@wild heretic I like that idea, that perhaps the mud was removed when it was still soft. Those holes running up both side of the Treasury, I too think were used for scaffolding for the excavation/uncovering of the building.

When you look at the free standing ruins in Petra, looks like they made everything out of big bricks. but I wonder if the more "Roman" ruins are later construction and all the "rock cut" stuff was earlier and completely buried.

Jordan-Petra-Qasa-Al-Bint-Temple-1440x981.jpgQasr_al-Bint,_Petra.jpgGreat_Temple_of_Petra_02.jpg

then this part, the arches in the middle area, that looks like the interior of some huge structure, and all that remains is some of the inside of the building.
petra_the_urn_tomb.jpg711384962-petra-jordan-bedouin-market-stand-new-seven-wonders-of-the-world.jpg_dsc3273-petra-web.jpg

More weathering.
Jordan, Petra 2.jpgJordan-Petra-20100215-233.jpg

and we need to address one of the real elephant in the room, the size of these buildings. Look at the people at the Monastery. Jeez who were these made for!! And don't forget here the little Urn at the top! The original builders of Petra were a very large race of beings.

petra monastery.jpgEd Der Looms print 1935.jpg

Well anyway, it's a mystery I'll never figure out in my life time. Petra seems to be one a site where there are I think at least 3 different civilizations/builders using it. The massively huge construction, which includes the Treasury and the Monastery, all the rose colored sandstone "rock cut" structures, are the first generation of Petra. Like this, matches the exact same style as the Treasure and The Monastery.

809640553_royal-tombs-petra-525x357.jpgPetra-The-Monastery-23290640.jpgTreasury.jpg

then all this stuff is second.

711384962-petra-jordan-bedouin-market-stand-new-seven-wonders-of-the-world.jpgJordan, Petra 2.jpgJordan-Petra-20100215-233.jpgweathering3.jpgLion tomb.jpg

and the most recent and it appears to be for much smaller scale individuals.

Great_Temple_of_Petra_02.jpgJordan-Petra-Qasa-Al-Bint-Temple-1440x981.jpgQasr_al-Bint,_Petra.jpg

It's sure great to be able to brainstorm with everybody. :)
 

Tumppigo

New member
Messages
1
Reactions
4
Can someone explain this image from this video: (at 12:15l. It is from Petra, Jordan. Ice Nine have a similar in his/hers latest post.

Screenshot_20190425_185014_com.google.android.youtube.jpg

Is it some kind of destruction that trashed the lower part or was the higher part renovated when the lower part was hidden below the ground?

It looks so strange.
 

Timeshifter

Well-known member
Messages
662
Reactions
2,203
One thing, among many, that bothers me, how come the walls are so smooth and black in some places. Like something originally cut right through the rock, it doesn't look natural at all to me.
the other day I was looking at some old engravings and I think it was in Greece someplace and a building had the exact facade as the Treasury bldg, the split roof line or gable what ever it is called. And then I got side tracked and never got back to it, so if anybody ever sees anything like this, please make note of it.

anyway the walls look weird, that doesn't look like weathering from wind and water. Anybody have a good idea?

View attachment 10412View attachment 10412

View attachment 10415

View attachment 10416
Looks like it was cut on a water jet!!
 
OP
Ice Nine

Ice Nine

Well-known member
Messages
754
Reactions
3,402
Can someone explain this image from this video: (at 12:15l. It is from Petra, Jordan. Ice Nine have a similar in his/hers latest post.

View attachment 20688

Is it some kind of destruction that trashed the lower part or was the higher part renovated when the lower part was hidden below the ground?

It looks so strange.
I think the bottom part was from water damage, water running through there for who knows how many years, it still floods there today once in a while. They just had a major flood through Petra last year.

I honestly don't know what I think sometimes, I don't think any of it was rock cut originally, it is all part of a great buried city, slowly eroding away and being uncovered over the centuries. Most of the upper parts of the buildings are almost pristine, compared to the insides and lower portions. Maybe they were all wood buildings and they have turned to stone due to some natural process I can't explain. They is much evidence to support that theory in other stone and/or rock cut structures, world wide.

Looks like it was cut on a water jet!!
Sure looks like something more sophisticated than stone tools and copper chisels were used. Unless Petra is like the stone temples in India, where the workers said all they did was just have to chip away at the stone and the Temple showed itself. I've also read an account when talking of the Kailash Temple, they referred to it as being excavated, not carved, but excavated.
But even if these places were buried and then uncovered later, who built them to begin with??

petra_the_treasury_from_above.jpg

The smooth side cliff wall, both sides of the Treasury Building, look like they were cut through by a laser beam or some sort of blast. The opposite canyon wall is not as smooth, one side smooth, one side more natural, what did that, I wonder. I'll try to find a good picture of the opposite side.

OK this is the best I can do, a 360 tour of Petra, around the Treasury, it looks like something cut it, did water do all of that, not unless it was a water jet, something just cut a big swath through the rock, the sides are so smooth.

Petra, Jordan a 360 tour
 
Last edited:

jd755

Well-known member
Messages
1,215
Reactions
3,103
Peering back into the past at one place in particular as some sort of measure if you will through a shortish period of time.

A drawing from 1830 عصر الأنباط (القرن الرابع ق.م. - القرن الزول ب. م.)
1830.jpg

A photograph from 1860 (removed the tumblr link as the software on here automatically loads the bigger picture.)
1860.jpg

A photograph from 1900 http://gertrudebell.ncl.ac.uk/images/A_430.jpg
1890.jpg
Doesn't appear to change much except for the amount of vegetation knocking about. Tourism was not a 'thing' back then or so it seems.

Tried to find one of the place being flooded but sadly none. A lot of floods in Petra, shifting lots of mud and sand about but none of this facade.
Interestingly the photographer of the 1900 picture Gertrude Bell called it a frieze.

In fact it seems little changed even today apart from the replacement column and other such 'renovation' the bulk of it looks just as it did in 1830.

Then I discovered this collection of photographs taken in the 1890's by Brünnow and Domaszewski. Browse Items · Archaeological Archives

Here is there picture, one of them anyway. You will have to go there to see it as the University people don't like sharing.
El-Hazne (No. 62 · Archaeological Archives

Which brought me to the many names of Petra. Isn't there always 'many names' given to these so called 'historic' sites, rhetorical question.

Petra, Sela, El-Hazne to name but three. The bloke who is supposed to have 'rediscovered' the place and his shortish life is a rabbit warren never mind a hole so just giving a link I found in the waybackmachine for now so as not to detract h2g2 - Johann Ludwig Burckhardt, 'Sheikh Ibrahim' - Edited Entry except to say the story is a bit odd to say the least.

Here's a second one where the author has some interesting things to say on the myth making and his astonishment at how they stick.
Petra - Myth and reality

And one of travellers tales from the 1800's-1900's.
petra | Search Results | East of Jordan

The question then appeared "What am I really looking at?" in these images.
Seems to me its what I have been trained to see. Columns for example = temple. Another is the pointed gable over the door = Greek with a third being a massive opening = doorway and giants. You get my drift I'm sure.

Stepping out of this learned interpretation which seems to happen inside an instant in the brain is not easy, for me at least but giving it a go this is what I came up with, not raining on anyone's parade just my take on it that's all.

Were it built by people much bigger than we are today why is the second floor not built to the same proportions?
Big openings in buildings today fall into two categories as far as I can tell. One being something big needs to get in our out like a truck for example or an elephant. Even horses need bigger opening than we do.
Second its a dick waving exercise where some strange, to me, need to show off how successful one is one has to 'build bigger'. Look at the buildings of authority and how massive they are, how massive many (not all) the entrances are.
To me either whatever went in or out of that room, if anything was big aka taller rather than wider or whoever built it was showing off.

The pristine nature of the upper columns contrasted with the badly eroded or otherwise damaged reliefs alongside feels nonsensical. To get to them to physically smash them would have taken some effort, not impossible true but the selective damage alongside pristine stonework feels very selective.
Also the weathering or erosion of the 'natural' stone alongside is hard for me to reconcile with zero erosion damage to the columns.

The supposition is that the people who created this structure had techniques at hand or machines at hand (maybe both) that do not seem to exist today all that comes close is the term 'high technology' so water jets and lasers pop out. Hammer and chisels in sandstone is possible, I've often shaped sandstone and limestone for garden walls but only very roughly. To get that level of craftsmanship is a skill I don't have but here in Britain sandstone wears away very quickly. Once the cut surface gets moisture in the right place it begins to flake and when ice forms it fails badly and once the uncut underlying stone hits the weather then even the rain starts to dissolve it out (probably not the scientific term but just what the eyes observe) when dry the stone literally turns to sand.
Doesn't appear to be any scaffolding marks anywhere on that face and whether by any of the known tech or not scaffolding is required to get to the surface of the rock and work it.
Unless the machine stood on the ground or was hung down from the top of the rock face, perhaps that's where the scaffolding was used by hanging from above hence no marks. Tis a conundrum.

What is clear to me is the vegetation and the climate of the day when it was made are not the same as those prevailing today. What we get shown today is a carefully crafted 'dusty desert' theme when the photographs of the 1800's reveal a rather different, greener picture. Sparse greenery granted but it point to there being more water about and the flood pictures show how the rains run mud off so once again I find myself wondering where all the trees went.

There is no conclusion to be had for me one way or the other. Casting and moulding make more sense than carving by whatever means. Liquefying mountains maybe possible certainly volcanoes can do it but laying the liquefaction down gently enough and with enough care to not destroy the things it lands on doesn't seem to be within the gift of the volcano.
Showing off seems to be just as likely as built by giants though I wonder why it was crafted where it was but then again if the land above were once full of trees perhaps a river once flowed long the 'dusty path' and this place was only accessible by water. Authority seems to value seclusion quite highly even today.

Oops. Forgot to mention I could find nothing about the restoration of that column missing in the early images. I feel sure someone else will.
 
Last edited:

whitewave

Well-known member
Messages
1,570
Reactions
5,419
in Britain sandstone wears away very quickly. Once the cut surface gets moisture in the right place it begins to flake and when ice forms it fails badly and once the uncut underlying stone hits the weather then even the rain starts to dissolve it out (probably not the scientific term but just what the eyes observe) when dry the stone literally turns to sand.
One has to wonder how sandstone ever forms in the first place. Surely Britain (and everywhere else) gets moisture and ice every year. Sandstone DOES erode quickly in the presence of moisture and ice so what climatic conditions were prevalent when sandstone formed? And how long ago was that? Couldn't have been too long because we still have sandstone and we get rains (sometimes floods) and ice every year.
 
Top