Mud Flood Himalaya

BStankman

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I didn't translate, but the photos say enough.

Dig out the house.

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Slap the same mud on the wall for repairs.

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Pour some paint down the front, and you have a restored mudflood house.

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jd755

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My feeling is if the first picture I posted is of a mud flood then everything under that volume of mud is utterly destroyed save some bits at the leading edge of the flood when it stopped flowing.
Those folks are building from scratch.

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Ice Nine

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Alrighty," Namashung, a ten-hectare plain on the banks of a small river, is a good hour's drive from Lo Manthang, Mustangs' main town. "

The Mustang region, so much synchronicity on this forum. I believe the entire area was buried sky high, by ash and or mud.

From a post I made in another Tibet thread, Tibet needs a lot of investigating. Tartarian Fortresses? Jongs aka Dzongs in Lhasa, Tibet: Gyantse, Phari, Chitishio, etc

"Something major happened in Tibet, the Mustang Caves look to me to be the remains of a great covered city, it's been covered by ash or mud, looks like volcanic tuff. Anyway there are thousands of "sky caves" here along with some free standing buildings, Temples and other ruins, people are still living in the region and it is restricted and the site is currently listed as a UNESCO tentative site since 1996.
Mustang region Tibet
Much of the history of Mustang is about legends rather than documented facts. However, it is believed that Mustang or the Kingdom of Lo was once a part of Ngari area of Tibet and a loose collection of feudal estates.[14] Though the people of Mustang live within the geographic boundaries of Nepal, their history is also tied to Tibetan religion and culture, geography, and politics.[3] It was often closely linked to adjoining kingdoms of Western Tibet and, during other periods of history, politically linked to Lhasa, the capital of Central Tibet.[19] Lo was incorporated into the Tibetan Empire by Songtsen Gampo, the most famous Tibetan king.[14]

Dump a few gozillion tons of ash and mud over any of the Temples complexes (see other linked thread) in all the posts above and here's what you get."

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jd755

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Just to 'whet' your appetite, so to speak, from page 224 of this book comes this;

224 TIBET.



The valley of Jhansu, which is very extensive, has greatly the appearance of having been once the bed of a lake. We descended a high bank, and found the level surface covered with coarse greyish sand and round stones, and intersected by the channels of many watercourses. This conjecture therefore instantly occurred ; and the testimony of all whom I afterwards conversed Avitli tended to give weight to it. But they could by no means fix the period of its being drained: the change was too remote to remain impressed upon the minds of those who now inhabit the neighbourhood ; and I could obtain no determinate information, whether the discharge of the water was owing to art or nature.

The Tibetians, like their neighbours, possessed of an ardent spirit of devotion, do not hesitate to attribute the merit of every thing great, or singularly beneficial, to the agency of some supernatural being. As no records exist, to immortalize the author of a work eminently ingenious and useful, the lapse of many years is not necessary to involve the memory in complete oblivion ; and the credit of it soon helps to aggrandize the importance of some fictitious deity.

It is asserted that Tibet, in remote times, was almost totally inundated; and the removal oi the waters that covered its surface, is imputed to the miraculous interposition of some object o( their worship, whose chief temple is reported to be at Durgeedin, Gya. He, it is said, in compassion to the few inhabitants which Tibet contained, who in that age were little better than monkeys, drew off the waters through Bengal, and, by sending teachers among them, humanized the wretched race, who were subsequently to people it. In this belief of the Tibetians,which is too general to be totally rejected, it is not difficult to discover strong traces of the universal deluge, though the tradition, as might naturally be expected, is obscured by fable, and disfigured by a mixture of absurdity.
 
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Ice Nine

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Some sort of event caused a lake to drain and the area turned to a barren waste land. Eventually covered by a ton of what looks like volcanic ash and rocks. And of course at some point a mysterious stranger(s) shows up to help the less fortunate.

I wonder if "the leftovers" on higher elevations were built when there was actually a lake there. Because it would be hard to be building Temples in the middle of a disaster. I'm fairly certain the sky caves weren't originally that high off of the valley floor, unless they are the upper stories of many storied buildings.

Some close up pictures of the area caves on megaliths.org. And I always like her take on things.
Kingdom of Mustang
 
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BStankman

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The Mustang region, so much synchronicity on this forum.
@Ice Nine
I felt it too. We were on the verge of another breakthrough, but then it just stopped.

These caves in Nepal are another in a long line of buried multi story buildings.
These were large earlobe "Buddha" people similar to Bamiyan Afghanistan and Longmen_Grottoes China.

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This video spouts the UNESCO garbage in the first five minutes.
"carved in unstable rock so high up they are inaccessible"
But it is interesting if you skip ahead to the parts where they show the inside artwork and documents.


 
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Ice Nine

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UNESCO always pings my crap-o-meter.

The Longmen grottoes are insane! Any Buddhist caves I have seen all have almost identical art. I'll put large earlobes on my radar.

The ground is so unstable and crumbles away, yet the cave rooms are nice and solid. Hmmmm. almost like they were made of another material and buried by something. It's the same so many places, big crumbling piles of dirt and rock and nice solid buildings/rooms encased in it.

@BStankman: "These caves in Nepal are another in a long line of buried multi story buildings." That's exactly how I see it too.
 

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