Mud Flood: dating method heresy

rengel

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What do you think about the layer dating method? In my opinion, in most cases, that was a brilliant way to hide a super-fast accumulation of dirt (any type).

The honest errors of discoverers become the dogmas of their epigones.

When Nicolas Steno in 1669 formulated his for principles of the science of stratigraphy (the law of superposition being only the most famous) he approached the problem of the layering of soil quite naively. Sloppily expressed: What's deeper must be older. His ideas were later used by James Hutton to develop his theories about seabed deposition, uplifting, erosion, and submersion, which lead to the explanation i.e. of the sedimentary structures found in the Grand Canyon.

But in modern times, especially the Eruption of Mount St. Helen's in 1980 has shown that sedimentary structures like these found in the Grand Canyon can be formed within hours or days. I.e. see: Learning the lessons of Mount St Helens.

Furthermore scientist like Guy Berthault have proven Steno's theory to be wrong experimentally:
Time Required for Sedimentation Contradicts the Evolutionary Hypothesis
Experiments on lamination of sediments
Experiments on stratification of heterogeneous sand mixtures
But see also:
Critique of Guy Berthault's "Stratigraphy"

In most cases I do suspect some main stream scientist out there fearing to loose their face and their grands. They simply didn't or don't yet want know better out of quite mundane and human reasons.
But no, in most cases I don't supect some sinister forces out there 'to hide a super-fast accumulation of dirt' in order to what?
 
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wizz33

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see the discovery of Easter Island for some strange dates
 

Banta

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The honest errors of discoverers become the dogmas of their epigones.

When Nicolas Steno in 1669 formulated his for principles of the science of stratigraphy (the law of superposition being only the most famous) he approached the problem of the layering of soil quite naively. Sloppily expressed: What's deeper must be older. His ideas were later used by James Hutton to develop his theories about seabed deposition, uplifting, erosion, and submersion, which lead to the explanation i.e. of the sedimentary structures found in the Grand Canyon.

But in modern times, especially the Eruption of Mount St. Helen's in 1980 has shown that sedimentary structures like these found in the Grand Canyon can be formed within hours or days. I.e. see: Learning the lessons of Mount St Helens.

Furthermore scientist like Guy Berthault have proven Steno's theory to be wrong experimentally:
Time Required for Sedimentation Contradicts the Evolutionary Hypothesis
Experiments on lamination of sediments
Experiments on stratification of heterogeneous sand mixtures
But see also:
Critique of Guy Berthault's "Stratigraphy"

In most cases I do suspect some main stream scientist out there fearing to loose their face and their grands. They simply didn't or don't yet want know better out of quite mundane and human reasons.
But no, in most cases I don't supect some sinister forces out there 'to hide a super-fast accumulation of dirt' in order to what?
This is a great example of an anomaly that simply can't exist in the current accepted model and is so fundamentally invalidating to it that it has to be ignored. It really is common sense... if sedimentary structures can dramatically transform in much, much, MUCH smaller timeframes than conventionally believed, it simply invalidates a model based on gradual change.

It's inertia (heh) in my opinion that keeps these conceptual models floating around. That and the inability to scientifically validate anything that happened in the past. It opens the door for whatever story sounds the best and can be backed up with trivia. Plus, "gradual change" is the name of the entire game in the materialist, evolutionary, Big Bang paradigm. If you got billions of years, you better fill them.
 

daveyoung52

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There is no visible 1857 rupture, the upper area of the '1812' rupture is to my eyes very doubtful,the picture seems to show practically zero deposition between 1690 and '1812' and the upper deposits show no layers and look like the arrived in one event to my eyes.
 

EinarK

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What do you think about the layer dating method? In my opinion, in most cases, that was a brilliant way to hide a super-fast accumulation of dirt (any type).

This mudflood they found in good prove of.!
Mudflood comet-event vulcanic eruptions, and earth quake as pre-curser for the the plaque..

The Magdalene Floods of 1342-43 and the Black Death BY SACHA DOBLER ON • ( LEAVE A COMMENT ) There were many extreme floods in these two years in Europe and beyond, mostly from rainfalls, but even from “sea surges”. The main event of the week from July 19th ,1342 onwards, was the biggest flood disaster in Central Europe of at least the last millennium or even of the entire Holocene. It devastated primarily German farmland and towns. The actual Magdalene Flood had its main impact on July 19- 25th, 1342, but it took months for the rivers’ high water levels to subside. The name was derived from Saint Mary Magdalene Day, which is held on July 25th. The water masses, carrying erosion material, changed the demographics and scarred the topography of Germany permanently.

The Magdalene Floods of 1342-43 and the Black Death
Black Death and Abrupt Earth Changes in the 14th century

[In the years before the Black Death in Europe],”between Cathay and Persia there rained a vast rain of fire, falling in flakes like snow and burning up mountains and plains and other lands, with men and women;; and then arose vast masses of smoke;; and whoever beheld this died within the space of half an hour;; and likewise any man or woman who looked upon those who had seen this(..)”.1 --Philip Ziegler writing about the years before the out break of the Black Death “The middle of the fourteenth century was a period of extraordinary terror and disaster to Europe. Numerous portents, which sadly frightened the people, were followed by a pestilence which threatened to turn the continent into an unpeopled wilderness. For year after year there were signs in the sky, on the earth, in the air, all indicative, as men thought, of some terrible coming event. In 1337 a great comet appeared in the heavens, its far-extending tail sowing deep dread in the minds of the ignorant masses. During the three succeeding years the land was visited by enormous flying armies of locusts, which descended in myriads upon the fields, and left the shadow of famine in their track.


In 1337 a great comet appeared in the heavens, its far-extending tail sowing deep dread in the minds of the ignorant masses. During the three succeeding years the land was visited by enormous flying armies of locusts, which descended in myriads upon the fields, and left the shadow of famine in their track. In 1348 came an earthquake of such frightful violence that many men deemed the end of the world to be presaged. Its devastations were widely spread. Cyprus, Greece, and Italy were terribly visited, and it extended through the Alpine valleys as far as Basle. Mountains sank into the earth. In Carinthia thirty villages and the tower of Villach were ruined. The air grew thick and stifling. There were dense and frightful fogs. Wine fermented in the casks. Fiery meteors appeared in the skies. A gigantic pillar of flame was seen by hundreds descending upon the roof of the pope’s palace at Avignon. In 1356 came another earthquake, which destroyed almost the whole of Basle. What with famine, flood, fog, locust swarms, earthquakes, and the like, it is not surprising that many men deemed the cup of the world’s sins to be full, and the end of the kingdom of man to be at hand.” --Morris, C,1893: Historical Table 2

The period from 1310-1350 saw the death of at least 50 to 70% of the population of Europe and Asia, in some areas, the accumulated death toll of the years of the Black Death alone is believed to be in the 75 % range. It took more than 200 years for the population of Europe to recover to the previous numbers of the late 13th century.3 Already in 1315 -1320, the decline in population coincided with natural disasters that led to crop failure, abandonment of farm land, and the Great Famine that killed about 30% of the European population.
 
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