Meteora Monasteries, Greece and Hermit caves

Ice Nine

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Oh boy, these things! the Monasteries, here is the in a nutshell accepted version of how they were built. And after you take some close looks at the pictures, try not to laugh.

" One of the top things to do in Meteora is to visit the impressive monasteries perched atop rocky boulders with seemingly no easy access to the top, and if they look difficult to enter, it’s because they were meant to be so.

These monasteries were built by monks looking for solitude, and building atop a rock that requires ropes, ladders, and a whole lot of upper body strength to reach, certainly dwindles down the number of people who are you going to pay you a visit.

Today, staircases and bridges make it easy for travellers to drop by."

Me again, the only explanation I can see is this entire region was completely covered in something, ash/mud, combination of the two? and some of the structures on the highest parts of this massive city had to have been high enough to not get completely covered. The Monasteries appear to be growing right out of their rock perches, the stuff that flowed around them is still evident all around on the structures themselves. How can people just ignore this?!?

The cliffs surrounding the area are riddled with Hermit caves that certainly support my idea, you will understand when you see the photos.
And here is the usual gibberish from Wackipedia
.wiki/Meteora

Monasteries
The exact date of the establishment of the monasteries is unknown. By the late 11th and early 12th centuries, a rudimentary monastic state had formed called the Skete of Stagoi and was centered around the still-standing church of Theotokos (mother of God). By the end of the 12th century, an ascetic community had flocked to Meteora.

In 1344, Athanasios Koinovitis from Mount Athos brought a group of followers to Meteora. From 1356 to 1372, he founded the great Meteoron monastery on the Broad Rock, which was perfect for the monks; they were safe from political upheaval and had complete control of the entry to the monastery. The only means of reaching it was by climbing a long ladder, which was drawn up whenever the monks felt threatened.

At the end of the 14th century, the Byzantine Empire's reign over northern Greece was being increasingly threatened by Turkish raiders who wanted control over the fertile plain of Thessaly. The hermit monks, seeking a retreat from the expanding Turkish occupation, found the inaccessible rock pillars of Meteora to be an ideal refuge. More than 20 monasteries were built, beginning in the 14th century. Six remain today.

In 1517 Theophanes built the monastery of Varlaam, which was reputed to house the finger of St John and the shoulder blade of St Andrew.

Access to the monasteries was originally (and deliberately) difficult, requiring either long ladders lashed together or large nets used to haul up both goods and people. This required quite a leap of faith – the ropes were replaced, so the story goes, only "when the Lord let them break". In the words of UNESCO, "The net in which intrepid pilgrims were hoisted up vertically alongside the 373 metres (1,224 ft) cliff where the Varlaam monastery dominates the valley symbolizes the fragility of a traditional way of life that is threatened with extinction."

Until the 17th century, the primary means of conveying goods and people from these eyries was by means of baskets and ropes.

In 1921, Queen Marie of Romania visited Meteora, becoming the first woman ever allowed to enter the Great Meteoron monastery.

In the 1920s there was an improvement in the arrangements. Steps were cut into the rock, making the complex accessible via a bridge from the nearby plateau. During World War II the site was bombed. Many art treasures were stolen.

75052396-meteora-monasteries.jpgMeteora 2.jpgMeteora 3.jpgMeteora 4.jpgmeteora 5.jpgMeteora.JPGMeteora7.jpgMeteora6.jpgMeteora_Agios_Nikolaos_Anapafsas_IMG_7817.jpgMeteora_monasteries.jpgMeteora1.jpgmeteora4.jpgmeteora-7.jpgmeteora-15-2-1024x682.jpgMeteora-Greece-19.jpgMeteora caves.jpgMeteora-hermit-monastery-3.jpgmeteora-hermits-2.jpg
 
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BStankman

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Me again, the only explanation I can see is this entire region was completely covered in something, ash/mud, combination of the two? and some of the structures on the highest parts of this massive city had to have been high enough to not get completely covered. The Monasteries appear to be growing right out of their rock perches, the stuff that flowed around them is still evident all around on the structures themselves. How can people just ignore this?!?
No doubt. Just look at the discoloration and excavation marks.
16183
16184
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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The over-burden is incredible, this one picture of a cliff side building, but every one shows the same thing in varying degrees as do the Hermit caves
and another big picture, not that anybody needs to point any of this out much, talk about in your face evidence, you can see it on all the Monstatires. Nobody builds like this, unless somebody figure out how to grow brick structures out of solid rock.
Meteora1.jpgMEGALO-METEORO.jpg

@Gerardgeert thanks for the movie trailers and recommendation, it would be fun to watch just for the scenery and Monasteries.
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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When you look at the remaining structures, the monasteries, I don't get the same sense of antiquity as I do with places like Eski Kermen, Cappadocia and Petra, to name just a very few. Meteora looks like a later "event".
I've just given up trying to explain or get a handle on just exactly went on over the eons. Volcanos, Earth expanding or contracting, pole shifts, mud rains, ash and mud flows, DEW weapons at some point employed, earthquakes, tsunamis, Atomic bombs, asteroids and comets slamming into the Earth. I'm sure I'm missing a lot more. Sitting submerged on the ocean floor for eons, only to reemerge after some event.

That submerged senario won't work for some city like Meteora though. Meteora looks like a giant lahar went through the area, sparing a few buildings on the higher areas, like if San Francisco got covered with a lot of mud and ash flowing through and it didn't quite get to the top of the hills, sparing a few structures. Maybe a few people survived in the higher buildings and were able to start cleaning up and scrapping some of the overburden off before it got too hard.
Or maybe all the people were wiped out and they sat vacant for who knows how long until some other people came along and laid claim to them. Take advantage of the situation and move in, once they figured out how to get up into them.
 

BrokenAgate

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I am intrigued by how the monasteries are perched so precisely on top of these towers of stone, so that there are sheer drop-offs right at the perimeters of the buildings. It's as if the lahar flow was excavated around them using machinery. I don't know how else they would end up looking like that.
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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I am intrigued by how the monasteries are perched so precisely on top of these towers of stone, so that there are sheer drop-offs right at the perimeters of the buildings. It's as if the lahar flow was excavated around them using machinery. I don't know how else they would end up looking like that.
Or maybe for many years water ran through the area and washed way a lot of it away. Water running through an area can do remarkable things, think of the Grand Canyon for instance. Or machinery and then over years the evidence of that was eroded and erased.

I don't know how it happened, but there is clearly rock hardened overburden all over the bases of the monasteries. And around the "cave" openings.
 

BStankman

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The over-burden is incredible, this one picture of a cliff side building, but every one shows the same thing in varying degrees as do the Hermit caves
and another big picture, not that anybody needs to point any of this out much, talk about in your face evidence, you can see it on all the Monstatires.
overburden
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Volcanic looking stones
16215 16216

Greece: The Holy Monastery of Great Meteoron


The church of the Assumption of Virgin Mary, which is found in the old town, was erected between the 10th and the 11th century on the ruins of an old Cristian basilica church.

1621716218 16219

https://meteora.com/byzantine-church-of-virgin-mary/
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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Great links to more goodies @BStankman
The side of this staircase on the free standing central altar, the carvings on the side, they look Celtic and the center panel has a big cross that is very reminiscent of a Maltese cross. I suppose it would be hard to know what was original to these Monasteries, if they were even Monasteries originally,

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They could have just been nice big homes, the houses on the hilltops of some city.
Whatever the hell they were, they were partially buried at one time and along time ago.
 

BrokenAgate

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Or maybe for many years water ran through the area and washed way a lot of it away. Water running through an area can do remarkable things, think of the Grand Canyon for instance. Or machinery and then over years the evidence of that was eroded and erased.

I don't know how it happened, but there is clearly rock hardened overburden all over the bases of the monasteries. And around the "cave" openings.
Well, I have doubts now that the Grand Canyon really was formed simply by a river flowing over millions of years. I look at the size of the river compared to the width of the canyon, and it just doesn't add up. Anyway, yes, it's obvious that the rock was formed after the monasteries, and not the other way around. Makes me wonder what might be underneath all that overburden, completely buried. Out of sight, out of mind.
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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Well, I have doubts now that the Grand Canyon really was formed simply by a river flowing over millions of years. I look at the size of the river compared to the width of the canyon, and it just doesn't add up. Anyway, yes, it's obvious that the rock was formed after the monasteries, and not the other way around. Makes me wonder what might be underneath all that overburden, completely buried. Out of sight, out of mind.
Here in Washington State we have Dry Falls and the Scablands and there is much evidence all over the State of glacial floods and the incredible damage they can do and what gets carried away. My point being a lot more than I can imagine can get swept away, amount wise.

A better example than the Grand Canyon.
Glacial Lake Missoula and the Ice Age Floods It took along time for this story to be told, it involved a bit of geologic heresy on the part of two geologists. I don't often look to mainstream "experts" but what they have concluded seem to sum up what happened to my satisfaction.

My point being a lot more than I can imagine can get swept/washed away, amount wise.

I like to look at all angles when trying to figure out just what happened and how. And still nothing makes any sense other than something soft flowed through Meteora, taking most of the town with it and left a few places on their hilltops, nicely covered part way up in soft ooze that eventually hardened.
 

Gerardgeert

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I like to look at all angles when trying to figure out just what happened and how.
And i heard the grand canyon come up a few times, so.....sorry but i cant help myself, i have to share
I didn’t here you say a thing about the thunderbolts.....

...i’m a believer(sort of)


But this one i like more


There is more and better(about earth), but it is somewhere inside the compilation-video’s
 

BrokenAgate

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Yeah, I love the Thunderbolts channel! I think they have a much better explanation for the formation of canyons and mountain ranges that the current crop of geologists. I wonder if something similar wrought havoc among those monasteries, carving out canyons and leaving only a few buildings remaining. The whole region looks so odd, as if tremendous forces covered up, and then carved up, everything for hundreds of square miles.

I found this page showing a lahar flow that covered up a town after Mount Pinatubo erupted. USGS: Volcano Hazards Program "Lahars move rapidly down valleys like rivers of concrete." Which only proves that stone doesn't have to require millions of years under the ground to form; it can form overnight, in the space of hours, from a mud flow that solidifies as soon as it stops flowing. "Lahars can occur with or without a volcanic eruption." Like, from melting glaciers in the Little Ice Age, for example? Perhaps a double-whammy involving an initial mud flow that buried everything, followed by an enormous flood of water that washed away the mud-covered houses in the lowlands, leaving the higher houses perched on pedestals of steep rock. Then monks came along and built ladders and steps so they could reach these places, which would have been safe from marauders.
 
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Ice Nine

Ice Nine

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I like the Thunderbolts people too, I don't discount anything that seems to make pretty good sense,

That's the problem, so many ideas seem to make sense, pretty much. And there could have been a different combination of "events" happening over the eons.
@BrokenAgate your above scenario sounds good to me. It looks like something flowed through Meteoro for sure, covering and then washing away.
 
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