Lightning Rod Fashion: 18th century grounded Umbrellas and Hats

Glumlit

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Old Ben Franklin flying a kite that has a key that is illuminated by the electrical charge. The key to extract atmospheric electricity is height from the ground symbolized by a kite. I wonder how many fools actually tried to attract lightning and perished.
Ok, this is may seem wacky but it comes back to the point:

Dreamtime posted a video in this thread about the apparent lack of even a need for sewer systems wayy back then.

In the video, there are a few still images of paintings of the Palace of Versailles and its fountains. These paintings depict gods in the clouds- as many back then do. That, paired with the crazy shit they had to do with water to accomplish the feats with their seemingly useless fountains, and not need toilets led me to wonder if the people (or gods) back then used the water/moisture in the air in ways we can't today.

painting1.jpg

Could the gods (who maybe built these buildings for themselves) use a power over water to fly through the air on clouds? Other flying people have to use wings. Was the moisture content of the air vastly different?

versailles_hall_of_mirrors_31363389129111.jpg
(Maybe you could poop in a cloud, I don't know)

But more starts to make sense to me if these gods are semi-aquatic beings from the heavens above the firmament
enclosed.jpg
Couldn't Zeus throw lightning?

And if we came from these water gods, a few other things fall into place as well

human_aquatic_adaptations.jpg
so they might have known a thing or two about the magic of water.

Then to bring it back:
Apparently it had to be storming, not just nighttime for the right conditions of this experiment. So if Ben Franklin made a key glow, did he need it to be storming for the humidity as well as the altitude and static electricity?
Or maybe the salinity of the air? I believe he was near a coast.

I don't know what other forces effect salt levels in the air. Or what could have been affecting it since then


But I do know that our own brains can't even fire without water and salts. Maybe the glow effect has some similar requirements we're overlooking
 
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Magnetic

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Ok, this is may seem wacky but it comes back to the point:

Dreamtime posted a video in this thread about the apparent lack of even a need for sewer systems wayy back then.

In the video, there are a few still images of paintings of the Palace of Versailles and its fountains. These paintings depict gods in the clouds- as many back then do. That, paired with the crazy shit they had to do with water to accomplish the feats with their seemingly useless fountains, and not need toilets led me to wonder if the people (or gods) back then used the water/moisture in the air in ways we can't today.

View attachment 10454

Could the gods (who maybe built these buildings for themselves) use a power over water to fly through the air on clouds? Other flying people have to use wings. Was the moisture content of the air vastly different?

View attachment 10455
(Maybe you could poop in a cloud, I don't know)

But more starts to make sense to me if these gods are semi-aquatic beings from the heavens above the firmament

View attachment 10456
Couldn't Zeus throw lightning?

And if we came from these water gods, a few other things fall into place as well

View attachment 10457
so they might have known a thing or two about the magic of water.


Then to bring it back:
Apparently it had to be storming, not just nighttime for the right conditions of this experiment. So if Ben Franklin made a key glow, did he need it to be storming for the humidity as well as the altitude and static electricity?
Or maybe the salinity of the air? I believe he was near a coast.

I don't know what other forces effect salt levels in the air. Or what could have been affecting it since then


But I do know that our own brains can't even fire without water and salts. Maybe the glow effect has some similar requirements we're overlooking
In our present day static electrical environment, humidity lowers the static electric charge potential: think of dry air in your winter heated house and getting a shock touching a door knob when walking on a rug. Falling rain or dust builds up static electrical potential due to uneven charges building up. Ya I read the aquatic ape in the last century and it does seem to indicate an aquatic adaptation. I just came up with a ribald idea about the elaborate fountains at Palace of Versailles. These were bidets! The elaborate water system provided drinking water, bathing opportunities, and waste disposal! When these structures were occupied by the previous civilization there was no winter and plants grew to a large size. There was no original heating system in the palace and one finds the same in St. Petersburg's palace also. Of course these were large beings who built the tall ceiling structures we inherited after they vanished.
 

Glumlit

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If low humidity results in visibly violent discharges, would that then mean that high humidity would allow for a more fluid flow of the energy that involves no sparks, and more of a "field" of electricity through the moist air? Is that where things would glow?

Was the water taken from our air?
 
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