Leonids Meteor shower of 1833

Onthebit

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I ran into this Chief John Smith charactor who lived from late 1700s to the early 1900s....
leonid_meteor_shower_1833.jpg
  • The image above shows a depiction of the Great Leonids Meteor Storm that occurred on November 13th, 1833 in which more than 72,000 meteors per hour fell to Earth, and which according to one observer caused the night sky to radiate so bright with falling stars that “people were awakened believing that their house was on fire!”
Apparently there is some objection to this age claim because he was heard to have said he was @10 the night the sky fell. (It's orbit is 33yrs so he could very well be that old)

The stars falling refers to the Leonid meteor shower of November 13, 1833, about which local historian Carl Zapffe writes: “Birthdates of Indians of the 19th Century had generally been determined by the Government in relation to the awe-inspiring shower of meteorites that burned through the American skies just before dawn on 13 November 1833, scaring the daylights out of civilized and uncivilized peoples alike.

Looking up this Leonids meteor shower I found a couple interesting things. The newspaper clipping in this article mentions "a luminous trail as that left by a sky rocket'
The Great Meteor Storm of 1833

which made me think of white phosphorous because don't you think it looks very similar to the illustrations of the great meteor shower?
Russia pounds Idlib, accuses US of using white phosphorus bombs | DW | 09.09.2018

'great streaks of phosphorescent brightness in their wake'
Image 27 of New York journal and advertiser (New York [N.Y.]), October 31, 1897, (AMERICAN MAGAZINE)

High strangeness don't you think?
 

KorbenDallas

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Are we able to find any publications (besides this one) closer to 1833 itself? It appears that everything I run into dated with the end of the 1870s-1880s. No matter what combination I try in the Google Ngram I get no info pertaining to 1830s. The best results come from "Leonid meteor." Try for yourself. Did they not write about it back then?

leonids_meteor.jpg

Interesting sources we have, like this one here.

lincoln_1833.jpg

Possibly found something pertaining to the actual 1833, but...
  • ...believed to be an 1899 edition of The Nashville American
1833_meteor.jpg

Source
It's kind of weird with dates there...

Meteorites1833.jpg

Source
Here is one from 1833 I think.

meteor_1833_1.jpg

Source
 

Recognition

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Interesting that he comments that at 5am 'the active state of atmospheric electricity was so much increased'. Fascinating. Woah, they are so casual about blurring the dates. Also, i find it profoundly uninteresting (masonic/illuminati stuff) but it might been significant, the switch from 33 to 99.
IMG_6098.JPG


Maybe trying to superimpose one event over the other? Not super hard considering the cyclic nature and very specific time span...
 
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Glumlit

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According to the Alexandria Gazette, November 22, 1836,
The shower happened annually on November 13, beginning in 1834 -not 1833. Starting between 3 & 4am each time. Getting weaker each year. With the majority of lights spurting out from a radiant star near Leo's eye -the same spot each year.
IMG_20190716_064534.jpg
IMG_20190716_064606.jpg
 

Recognition

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What's striking is that this happens every 33 years or so. Did it come out of nowhere and just start happening? Or has this been happening forever, just most people who knew what was happening, died in the flood/1812 events?
 
OP
Onthebit

Onthebit

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Seems it was the first time they paid attention to it. I thought same thing...doesn't sound right.
Do we have any accompanying events?
I've been looking but not much around that date specifically....an 8+ earthquake and tsumami on the other side of the world a few weeks later and blood rain reports a few days later which is the first time they've come up with iron and other minerals causing the colour.... sorry lost the links due to a crash. I read a book a few years ago written early 1900s-Im sure you'll know the book but I can't remember the name for the life of me to find it again even in my kindle. Anyway it talked about a lot of reported phenomena falling from the sky in historical times and recent....as recent as the publishing date.
Need key words to get the search engines to look but I can't think of them.....Key words used in 1800s to describe phenomena we may not recognize today... someone ?
 
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SuperTrouper

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What's striking is that this happens every 33 years or so. Did it come out of nowhere and just start happening? Or has this been happening forever, just most people who knew what was happening, died in the flood/1812 events?
From this source.

Four of the most spectacular meteor storms that have been witnessed in the past 200 yr, namely, in 1799, 1833, 1866 and 1966 (Kresak 1993) were associated with the Leonids. All four showers had a zenithal hourly rate (ZHR) in excess of 6000. It was established soon after its discovery in 1865 that comet 55prrempel-Tuttle, which has a very similar orbit to that of the Leonids with an orbital period of 33.5 yr, is the most likely parent of the Leonids. The only observed return of this comet since its discovery in 1865 was in 1965. No record appears to exist of the comet being observed at either of the two intervening returns in 1899 and 1932. However, observations of a comet in 1366 (Kanda 1932) and 1699 (Kirch 1737) were subsequently attributed to other apparitions of comet 55prrempel-Tuttle. It is generally accepted that the Leonid meteoroid storm is caused by a swarm of meteoroids in the vicinity of the comet. The most likely explanation for the swarm is that meteoroids at recent perihelion passages of the comet have not yet had time to disperse along the orbit. This view is supported by the fact that the Leonids have an hourly rate of only about 10 when the parent comet is far away from perihelion. Even when the comet is close to perihelion, the stream does not produce a very spectacular display on every occasion. For instance, in 1932, the Leonids had a maximum ZHR of only about 240 (Lowell 1954). References to 'falling stars' and similar descriptions can be found in many historical records. Yeomans (1981) and Hasegava (1993) have both chronicled and analysed these in so far as they pertain to the Leonids. Most storms appear to have occurred when the node of the cometary orbit is inside the Earth's orbit and the Earth reaches the closest point after the comet has passed through the node, in other words, when the Earth is sampling the region outside and behind the comet. Wu & Williams (1992) have shown that in the vicinity of the descending node, a model stream ejected from the parent comet is not symmetrical about the cometary orbit, the outside part being wider than the inner part. This would explain the recorded appearance of storms. The Leonids do not now appear to be subject to major perturbation as they were prior to 1898, and Brown & Jones (1993) suggested that, in consequence, a storm similar to that observed in 1966 would be seen at the end of this century.
 

Timeshifter

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Perhaps, with much less light pollution (pre 1900's) and a differing atmospheric conditions, these meteor shows appeared wholly different to how they now appear to us?

:unsure:
 

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