Leadville Ice Palace Colorado, 1896

Timeshifter

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Those 19th Century builders, eh?

I came across thus whilst looking at this thread Here by @KorbenDallas

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Interesting flags?

Usual story, town bankrupt but has to build something to attract visitors...

'In 1896 a spectacular true Norman ice palace stood on a gleaming, snow-covered rise above the City of Leadville, Colorado. Sitting at the foot of two of Colorado’s highest peaks, the ice castle was the largest ice structure ever built. The crystal castle housed a ballroom, a 180 foot skating rink, a curling rink, a restaurant, a dance floor, gaming rooms, a theatre, toboggan runs and a carousel house'

'Was built in just 36 days utilizing 5,000 tons of ice'

36 days.. as it turns out, its not built with ice at all, it is merely covered with it...


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'Construction began November 1, 1895 with a crew of 250 men working day and night. Day laborers were paid $2.50 per day and skilled laborers were paid $3.00 per day. The palace was more than 58,000 square feet – 325 x 180 feet, utilizing 180,000 board feet of lumber and 5,000 tons of ice. The palace was supported by a complex frame work of trusses, girders and timber, with the ice for appearance only. The ice was trimmed to size and placed in forms, then sprayed with water, which served as mortar to bind the blocks together. The towers reached 90 feet high by 40 feet wide and the palace encompassed 5 acres of ground.

Just 36 days later, the Ice Palace, between Seventh and Eighth Streets on top of Capitol Hill, was opened on January 1, 1896'

'Finally, the Ice Palace began to melt and the building was condemned on March 28, though skaters continued to skate on the ice rink until June.'

(Why not just poor more boiling water on it? Sarc)
I don't know folks, do you buy this stuff?

Maybe folks simply had a different outlook on whats the point back then...
 
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AgentOrange5

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Wow! This place is amazing! Of course it makes no sense. Nowadays, people can easily drive 4 or more hours for a "day trip" to some amazing attraction. And I suppose their were trains.....but still. What was the population in the surrounding area that could reasonably make such a trip? Given the price of trains and this attraction, how many people could afford to make the trip? Especially since we are told many places in the state were going bankrupt. And given the short life of this palace, why would anyone think it economically a good idea? Sounds like the place was closed before most people would have even had a chance to hear about, make arrangements to go (time off work or school, get someone to take care of their livestock, pets), and to save up to go. A moderately large town near me used to have an outdoor ice rink during the winter, and they quit having it because it was too expensive to keep vs the revenue the would get. No, I don't believe for a minute that Colorado built this gigantic ice palace for 5 months.
 
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Timeshifter

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Brain fart, perhaps it was already there, was not ice but LED lights or something, no one could figure it out & to stop people aaking questions, it got disapeared?
 

KorbenDallas

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Unless this thing was made out of glass, I do not see how it could already be there. Some of the pictures appear to be showing ice blocks, or glass blocks.

It’s just weird.
 
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Timeshifter

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Maybe it was made some type of glass, and used the atmosphere for energy? The atmosphere changed & it became useless.

Its another bizzare one
 

Recognition

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Maybe it was made some type of glass, and used the atmosphere for energy? The atmosphere changed & it became useless.

Its another bizzare one
It def has the aetheric energy antennae. Combined with glass building like that could be amazing, or, if it was ice, the builders instead of hauling blocks 75 miles (suuuuuuure) maybe used some sort of resonant frequency to move the blocks and shape the building?

It reminded me of the fitzgerald short story the ice palace. Here are some exerpts:

"After another ten minutes they turned a corner and came in sight of their destination. On a tall hill outlined in vivid glaring green against the wintry sky stood the ice palace. It was three stories in the air, with battlements and embrasures and narrow icicled windows, and the innumerable electric lights inside made a gorgeous transparency of the great central hall. Sally Carrol clutched Harry's hand under the fur robe.


"It's beautiful!" he cried excitedly. "My golly, it's beautiful, isn't it! They haven't had one here since eighty-five!"


Somehow the notion of there not having been one since eighty-five oppressed her. Ice was a ghost, and this mansion of it was surely peopled by those shades of the eighties, with pale faces and blurred snow-filled hair. "











"It's a hundred and seventy feet tall," Harry was saying to a muffled figure beside him as they trudged toward the entrance; "covers six thousand square yards."


She caught snatches of conversation: "One main hall"-- "walls twenty to forty inches thick"-- "and the ice cave has almost a mile of-- "-- "this Canuck who built it-- -- "


They found their way inside, and dazed by the magic of the great crystal walls Sally Carrol found herself repeating over and over two lines from "Kubla Khan": "


"Come on!" shouted Harry. "We want to see the labyrinths down-stairs before they turn the lights off!"




She gets lost in the ice palace and has a breakdown





"She reached pitifully for the wall. Forty inches thick, they had said-- forty inches thick!


"Oh!"


On both sides of her along the walls she felt things creeping, damp souls that haunted this palace, this town, this North.


"Oh, send somebody-- send somebody!" she cried aloud. "
 
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